Gun-Friendly TUSC Cryptocurrency Launches New Blockchain

TUSC cryptocurrency

Courtesy TUSC

TUSC announced today that over the holidays they successfully launched their main net, opened their chain to public block producers, and resumed trading on the Altilly cryptocurrency exchange.

Rob McNealy, TUSC’s Cofounder, said:

“We are excited to finally bring this project home and get launched. Our volunteer team has worked very hard over the past 14 months to make this a reality and I could not be prouder of them. The rollout had some minor UI bugs, which are being corrected, but the core has been functioning flawlessly. I am very excited by how fast our network is; we have three second block times, so confirmation times (authorizations) are just as fast normal credit card processing. The transition to crypto payments should be virtually seamless for both retailers and customers.”

McNealy said:

“As gun owners, and ardent defenders of the right to self-defense, we know that the gun industry is constantly under attack. We wanted to create a gun-centric crypto to act as a ‘continuity of business’ payment system for gun retailers. Due to their decentralized nature, blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies simply can’t be shut down by ‘activist’ banks.”

About TUSC

TUSC – The Universal Settlement Coin, is an open source, pure payments cryptocurrency project built on a delegated proof of stake (DPOS) blockchain. TUSC is a decentralized, non-ICO, community project with on-chain governance.

TUSC was purpose-built for retailer adoption using a unique marketing model with an elected and term limited third-party vendor called the Marketing Partner, whose role is to support the onboarding of retailers and promote TUSC through aggressive marketing and sales strategies to vertical markets and industries with recognized problems with existing payment systems.

comments

  1. avatar Steve Eisenberg says:

    My hair hurts.

  2. avatar IAmNotTheHulk says:

    Sure it can, how are you gonna transfer money when your bank wont allow it to move to Tusc when they decide that they(the banks, CC etc) decide TUSC is in bed with gun companies ….

    1. avatar arc says:

      Smart people don’t use KYC exchanges and BTC can be bought with cash. Crypto is primarily good for long distance transactions, keeping your money from being confiscated/stolen, and for getting your money from one country to the next. Its great for donating to causes and people that the establishment doesn’t approve of. I have been paid in the past with crypto and its great for people who have been shitlisted by paypal or just want privacy in their associations and transactions.

      Crypto is coming to a big fork soon in its development as a whole. We will soon have KYC crypto for the banks, etc, tied to your name, and dark crypto which can’t be pinned to you or anyone else because there is no PII or even general information associated to the wallet, if you are using it correctly. Only an imbicile would move dark money to the light, likewise only a moron declares their gold and ammo assets.

      I did miss out on millions because no one would help a stupid kid set up his miner when it was still a benchmark / stupid game and the coins didn’t even have a price tag. People were pulling in 100+ coins a day on just benchmarks and they were discarded. But enough pity party, I have a new path to my millions (a business) and I’m burning the rubber on the road going full steam ahead. I’ll eventually accept crypto when I have enough sales to justify my own website and move off of ebay and etsy.

      1. avatar Mark N. says:

        I have no idea what you are talking about, and I doubt I ever will, much less have the need to. I suspect that cash will always work.

        1. avatar Arc says:

          In a nutshell: Don’t take off the books money and put it on the books. A “Know Your Customer” (KYC) exchange requires a lot of information to conform to US bank/institutional standards, a non-KYC exchange has no such requirements, is usually located outside of the five eyes, and are the preferred exchanges.

          The whole point of crypto is to kick the banks and government out of your money. You can put your money into crypto and it will remain outside of the reach of the beast, however, it is subject to market volatility and we have all seen how much BTC can swing. You can leave the country and take ALL of your money with you, not so with gold, fiat, or anything in the US banking system. You can send money directly to friends and family outside of the US without hassle.

          If you really want to keep your transactions private, use a new wallet for every major transaction with someone, or split a transaction to multiple addresses. As long as no personal identifying information, including your network information, is associated to the wallet, its entirely anonymous. Purchase from each wallet as needed, consolidate them as needed.

          Crypto currencies are a direct threat to government issued fiat and control, that is why it is so feared by he established powers. Its like the internet all over again, we the people got some of our financial rights back and we are keeping them.

        2. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          Cash has always worked for me, is anonymous, and is accepted everywhere. Oh, and it’s been really handy when a region-wide power outage hit and none of the stores could conduct any electronic transactions.

          I’ll keep using it, thanks.

        3. avatar arc says:

          No one ever said you have to stop, use both, they are all tools in the tool box. Its like the people trying to say gold is better than crypto and crypto is better than gold, its reminiscent of childhood days and a parent saying you can’t have both. Adults get both and more, choosing is for kids.

          Gold is a tool to hold wealth long term from one economy to the next, from good times to good times. Its not for bartering!
          Crypto is a tool to break down barriers and retain sovereignty over your money, move it from place to place without interference. It shouldn’t be used to park wealth.
          Cash is a tool to pay people regardless of the situation, its low tech and just works. The system can glitch out all it wants but cash is still kind because its a human currency, not computer. I’ve needed it before and I’ll need it again.

    2. avatar arc says:

      I should also add that TUSC probably isn’t bought directly unless they have their own portal for FRN/IOU notes (US dollars) to TUSC. Its likely bought with BTC, ETH, LTC, or XRP on exchanges that carry the currency and you can use FRNs in a coins for cash store, or an ATM to get anon BTC to your private wallet.

      The bockchain may keep account of every transaction but unless you attach PII to the wallet address, its impossible to know who actually owns that wallet. People can only see the balance and the transactions its made.

      1. avatar Rob McNealy says:

        In the future, we are open to launching additional privacy features if the community supports that. Code changes in TUSC have to be voted in.

      2. avatar uncommon_sense says:

        arc,

        Last I checked, SDOTI most likely posted an outstanding and informative LOCC. Unfortunately, most people HNFC what he said because he suffered from AS.

        Totally confused? So are 99.9% of the people who read your comment. Stop using acronyms. Start spelling things out so that a much larger audience can understand what you are saying.

        And here is the decoded version of what I typed above:

        Last I checked, SDOTI (some dude on the Internet) most likely posted an outstanding and informative LOCC (lesson on cryptocurrency). Unfortunately, most people HNFC (had no fvcking clue) what he said because he suffered from AS (acronym syndrome).

    3. avatar Rob McNealy says:

      Unlike credit cards, Venmo, PayPal, etc., TUSC can’t shut down your account based on a political whim. It’s technically not possible for the network to do that. It’s just open source software that doesn’t have a central point of control or a kill switch. It’s a new technology.

      But as far as liquidity goes TUSC, and all cryptos in general, are becoming more liquid very rapidly. More exchanges are coming online, as well as crypto ATM networks.

      Our hope with TUSC is that over time, enough folks in the industry adopt it as a payment option, so retailers, distributors, etc., won’t need to convert back and forth with fiat at all.

      1. avatar Martha Thomas says:

        TUSC will never pay their building leases, insurance, or electric bills. They will always need to convert…

        1. avatar John Hull says:

          We’re a long, long way from the ubiquitous use of ‘credits’ like you see in science fiction books and movies. If it is electronic it can be manipulated, and nobody has yet come up with a fool proof way to prevent that. Until they do, I won’t go anywhere near cryptocurrency.

  3. avatar possum, and the "Coons of Doom" says:

    That guy sure seems happy about crypto currency, whatever that is.

    1. avatar Geoff "I'm getting too old for this shit" PR says:

      Do you have to use a waterproof ToughBook in your burrow?

  4. avatar Darkman says:

    If you take the time to seriously look into cryptocurrency. You’ll find it’s an even bigger pyramid scheme than our current monetary system. While the tax payers will foot the bill when our system fails. There is no identifiable monetary group backing cryptocurrency. Millions of dollars of cryptocurrency simple disappears on a regular basis. leaving the fool who invested in it holding an empty sack. Beware the plan that looks like it is the next financial savior.

    1. avatar Geoff "I'm getting too old for this shit" PR says:

      Yeah, I don’t trust it, and wallets have ‘disappeared’ on people

      “$1.1 billion in cryptocurrency has been stolen this year, and it was apparently easy to do”

      https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/07/1-point-1b-in-cryptocurrency-was-stolen-this-year-and-it-was-easy-to-do.html

      1. avatar arc says:

        You should have seen the Quickblocks? something exchange. All you had to do was enter some java or HTML or something into your address bar with the funds availability set to “true” and you could get $$ from the exchange wallet. I sold mine off before that happened but it basically went insolvent overnight because someone pilfered the place dry.

        Literal “Get woke, go broke.”

    2. avatar arc says:

      Taxpayers will only foot the bill if they consent to playing the game, I don’t consent and don’t keep my money in FRNs, or the beasts systems.

  5. avatar rt66paul says:

    Many new service related businesses have problems with credit card processing services. Either they get charged more per transaction or keep getting charged for “non qualifying actions” which add a couple percentage points to their already high costs. Since service based businesses are a little newer than others and/or offer certain services that cost more than pocket money, in order to survive, they need to be able to take credit cards.
    Something like a dog washing service, where the groomer comes to you in a van, can cause huge problems with credit card processing. The government and the banks want to control all money, these businesses don’t fit what they want. Carpet cleaning, mobile car wash/detailing, event ticket resale, party planning, check cashing, etc. is looked on as a potential money laundering. Add in businesses that are not PC in an area, and lack of access to proper banking can make or break a business. It is about time someone did something to address these problems.

    1. avatar arc says:

      I’m probably not going to bother with getting a merchant account for my business. According to other people in my line of business, big banks are already trying to black list it along with several market places like Ebay and etsy. Payment processors are nothing buy misery for a small business and you are essentially enslaved to them, many of them will likely just refuse to do business with me.

      I’ll stick to using cash, its dumb money, old fashion, and just works. Crypto also just simply works and is as simple as C&P/entering an address, the amount, and hitting send, well, after several confirmation requests telling you to triple check you have everything right.

    2. avatar Rob McNealy says:

      There are no chargebacks in TUSC. And TUSC can be used for any industry right now.
      However, we are bringing TUSC to the gun industry first because we are passionate gun people and know that crypto can help solve a major problem this industry has right now.

      1. avatar arc says:

        This is one of the perks I loved about crypto. Chargebacks are a problem for furry artists, as well as ‘underaged’ clients. All a person has to do is claim they aren’t 18 and paypal will automatically void and reverse any payment because they “can’t enter into a contract”. Its a pain in the ass.

        Once payment is sent in crypto, it is sent and there is no ‘undo’ button for it. The real problem is finding customers who know how to use it!

        1. avatar Sam Hill says:

          Is it how to use it, or, is it a trust issue? Nothing ain’t worth nothing if it is free. What backs gypsocrypto? Some 14 years old kid in his mom’s basement?

        2. avatar arc says:

          Not sure why my comment didn’t post last night, maybe because it was a mile long. Yes, most people are utterly ignorant on cryptocurrencies. They have no idea how to get them, why they are useful, how to store them, exchange them or spend them. You need to understand these people are the same types that watch CNN and Fox news, then claim they have an educated opinion. People need to learn how to use private currencies and trade tokens.

          Backing really depends on the crypto. Some tokens are backed by the services of the exchange that minted it like Binance token (BNB?), others are purely currency tokens and will only be worth what the market decides they are worth. The rules of the currency and the users of the currency back it. FRNs, often mistaken as US dollars, are also backed by nothing but blind faith.

          Think about it, how many billions of bank notes are printed every year, how much has your money been cheapened, your wealth stolen? Now how many new bitcoins are there? Yeah, the BTC supply is fixed until the users as a whole decide upon an amount to increase it by and how that increase will take place. It can’t be inflated without the consent of the users, while FRNs are subject to the whims of the FED and the us banking system. The US dollar has lost 98% of its value against gold and since 1990, its lost half of the pittance of buying power it still had, its on its death bed and like it or not, it will collapse entirely because we will not stop printing more.

          Bitcoin was never free and it was never given to anyone for nothing. In the early days, all the BTC ever created was in ‘pools’ and people mined the pool for the block reward from it. By mining, you are computing the transactions and calculations for the network, its a group effort and the group shares the block reward in proportion to the computational work done. Most of the Bitcoin is mined up, now the system runs on the transaction fees every time you send BTC to another wallet.

          The value of a crypto currency is subject to what the market and users decide. Back in the day, BTC was more of a hobby and a benchmark, then someone decided to sell two pizzas for about 14,000 which was the first well known transaction. After that, people decided they could trade goods and services in BTC. Thats all a currency is, a hard to counterfeit token that multiple people agree upon to exchange goods and services with.

          I have done business with people using Ethereum, before Bitcoin got the lightening network update. I can keep my Ethereum, buy something with it, or exchange it, including exchange it back to federal reserve notes. The customer was black listed by paypal but fortunately, he was computer literate, unlike the majority of the US population.

          Even a gold coin is only worth what someone is willing to give you for it, not what you think it should be valued at. Its cost prohibitive to create more gold and its also slow and costly to mine, likewise silver, which is why they were used as money for thousands of years.

          Cryptocurrencies are just that, currencies. Several gunshops can establish their own currency token and rules to govern it, including how voting rights are handled, if it will be minted, mined, airdropped, etc. I go to my LGS but they don’t have what I need so I buy some of the limited supply of gun friendly tokens they own and use them to buy what I want from another store across the country. I don’t have to deal with credit cards, politics, my accounts can’t be frozen, etc. I have effectively kicked banks and credit card companies out of my financial business. If LGS (A) runs out of tokens, the owner can go to a Bitcoin ATM, buy BTC with cash, exchange the BTC for “gun tokens” from LGS (B), and LGS (B) can turn the BTC back into cash.

          Crypto is all about retaking financial sovereignty and freedom to associate. We have regained some of our rights and I’m not one to just hand them back. Crypto is a direct threat to the federal reserve note, which is why the federal government and banks are trying their hardest to either control it, or ban it. They obviously can’t control it because we the people will just make another currency and stop using theirs. Gold can be stolen at checkpoints but a crypto wallet can’t be.

        3. avatar arc says:

          Double post, but a slight correction.

          To my knowledge, Bitcoin is actually supposed to inflate slightly starting around 2023, in the 2020s, as part of its original design. A few coins will be minted to continue transaction processing. It was intended to mimic gold mining and the annual inflation rate will ultimately hit zero, unless the users who hold the majority of the currency decide upon new rules.

  6. avatar former water walker says:

    No…he!! NO! Cash only…

    1. avatar Rob McNealy says:

      I love cash, and precious metals too, but it’s hard for a mom and pop gun shop to sell something online for cash. They need an method for accepting online payments and are mostly locked out of all major online payment systems right now because of politics.

      TUSC is an censorship resistant option that is free from politics.

      1. avatar kahlil says:

        sure, keep thinking it will change anything or solve any problems not addressed by other speculative fake currencies.

        1. avatar Arc says:

          Crypto lets me bypass paypal’s politics when selling R18 illustrations, that company should have been put under years ago. Crypto will let anyone bypass anything they want too because the whole point of crypto is to kick institutions out of your money and who you do business with.

  7. avatar Sam I Am says:

    Isn’t all this crypto currency merely a high-tech variation of Hawala?

    1. avatar arc says:

      Not sure what Hawala is but crypto is essentially privately issued currency. Its only going to be worth what people using it decide its worth. Some are utility tokens for various services and destroyed as they are used, increasing the value of the remaining ones. For BTC, its purely currency / money transfer.

      Yes, anyone can make a crypto, and cryptos fork all the time. The forks have no value unless people decide to use them. Likewise, BTC has several forks but TMK only BTCcash was successful. The forks don’t remove value from the original crypto, as long as people keep their money in it.

      I do not consider BTC to be a long term place to park wealth like gold, but it has its uses and if you have a little extra money, get a few BTC and put them away in a safe place, who knows what it will do in the future.

      1. avatar Sam I Am says:

        Hawala – think sending money via Western Union. It is an ancient Arab means of moving money without actually moving physical currency/coin. It is actually a little bit more complex than using Western Union, but you get the idea.
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawala

        1. avatar Arc says:

          Yes, I understand what you mean now. Person 1 basically deposit money at point A and has it sent to point B for person 2 to pick up. However, no money is actually moved, instead, point A tells “company” that they received money and point B may disburse the same amount from the cash they have on hand there… I think.

          Western union now requires ID for anything over $250 so if you are buying something with it that’s expensive, you need 2-3 transactions.

        2. avatar Sam I Am says:

          “Yes, I understand what you mean now.”

          Yeah, that is the bare bones description.

        3. avatar Geoff "I'm getting too old for this shit" PR says:

          “Hawala – think sending money via Western Union.”

          It has a level of built-in trust, if I recall correctly. All the players are on the same ideological ‘page’ so to speak, as Islam is the ‘glue’ in that system.

          That’s just not gonna work very well in the west…

        4. avatar Hush says:

          Sorta like a credit or debit card!

        5. avatar arc says:

          Tbh, I figured it might be something that started in Babylon with money lenders but I wouldn’t know. Although I wouldn’t trust someone who follows Islam, since they see me as the infidel, white devil, etc, and stealing from me would basically be jihad; usually people who are sincere about their faith can be trusted. It doesn’t matter if its Christian, Buddhist, Odinist, etc, they believe themselves accountable to a higher power and stealing is usually a no-no. Although the trust factor increases if they are in your own faith.

        6. avatar The Crimson Pirate says:

          Templars used to do the same thing for pilgrims and crusaders. Of course they were destroyed by organized states and their banking functions were taken over by those states or their puppets.

  8. avatar Militanto says:

    Look at the central banking shills in this comment section. Damn embarrassing.

  9. avatar John Hull says:

    It has taken humanity thousands and thousands of years to create a monetary system that is reliable and safe. For the most part, it is. When things happen that make it less safe, it isn’t the monetary system at fault, but the politicians and corrupt bureaucrats overseeing it that cause the problems. To fix things, you must ‘fix’ the corruption. If anybody thinks cryptocurrency is an safer, its just wishful thinking, and from what I can tell, it is even less safe because if something happens you have virtually no recourse for getting your money back.

    1. avatar Arc says:

      I consider it to be just as safe as cash but on a shorter life span / timeline. I doubt the current incarnation of BTC/LTC/ETC will be the one people are using in 10-15 years, it will change over time.

      The rules of the crypto you opt to use are transparent and usually it takes a very large consensus to change those rules. If you hold enough of the currency, you have more voting power usually, I recall its called “stake”. BTC, to my knowledge, is controlled by a hand full of people/whales, but changing the rules to ‘issue’ more BTC would likely negatively affect its value and people will dump it, so its in everyone’s interest to keep the rules the same as markets do not like uncertainty.

      I would not put heaps of money into crypto unless you are willing to lose it. Its absolutely not a good place to ‘park’ money, that’s what gold is for, long term storage, although crypto is a little harder to seize since all the information can be memorized, while gold is a physical object.

      1. avatar Rob McNealy says:

        Exactly.

        In a short period of time, you will be able to “atomic swap” TUSC out to BTC then to cash if you want. You don’t have to hold it.

        And the TUSC transactions fees are only 1/2% with instant confirmation and no chargeback, compared to the high fees associated with credit cards.

    2. avatar Militanto says:

      Gov back fiat currency is awful. How’s that fed payroll?

    3. avatar Rob McNealy says:

      All fiat currencies go to zero in time. Politicians can’t help themselves but inflate fiat currencies to insane levels.

      Safer is a relative term. Compared to what?

      The problem we are attempting to solve with TUSC is to help gun retailers do business without the fear of being shut down by activist banks, which is a very real problem right now.

      We don’t claim that it is a miracle cure all or panacea.

      That being said, the US government is $23 trillion in debt and is quickly losing its petro dollar reserve status. When that happens, the likely future for the overly inflated dollar looks bleak.

    4. avatar The Crimson Pirate says:

      John Hull,
      Any monetary system run or controlled by a limited group of people backed by the threat of force can never be safe or stable. The ability to inflate at will is an evil like no other. And today most of your U.S. dollars are electronic and not backed by anything any more. The world went off the gold standard in the 1930s and the fake gold standard of US banks was ended completely in 1971.

      When something goes wrong it is the systems fault. It is the system that facilitates the corruption. If you think you can change human nature and eliminate corruption then you are more delusional than a Virginia Democrat.

      1. avatar arc says:

        Even golds only backing is its historical use as money and its uses in industries, beyond that, there isn’t much to write home about but its still better than fiat currencies. No one ever said by fiat that bitcoin had value, but users started trading with it and established its value, it was organic, rather than dictate.

        The threat of force only works in so far as that force can be applied and people tolerate its use. We have alternatives to federal reserve notes now and don’t have to keep using the debt notes of the people who want us disarmed and exterminated. The federal government can still demand taxes in federal reserve notes but its trivial to exchange for some come tax day. For all other purposes, we need not use their toilet paper.

        Evil won’t be eliminated until God wraps things up. But we can beat down evil by denying it power and by not enabling it nor taking part it in it. We can build systems that are zero-trust and are very hard to corrupt but easily replaced when we the people deem it so.

  10. avatar Truckman says:

    If I cannot see it I don’t want it I would rather play roulette with precious metals at least you cannot lose everything without a trace as you can computer money that’s about as good to me as monopoly money not that I can afford to buy gold

    1. avatar arc says:

      Hard to lose crypto without utterly destroying the global internet and computers in every country. The blockchain will persist as long as one copy remains. Information can’t be seized from your brain yet.

      You are also missing the point of crypto, its not intended for long term wealth storage, its for moving money, traveling out of the country, bypassing barriers put up against your finances, etc. Gold is much better suited for long term wealth preservation but its easily seized/robbed if you try to leave the country with it or travel with it. You can turn gold into BTC, commit it to memory, then turn BTC back into gold in your new home country.

      They are both tools, don’t be so quick to dismiss either of them.

  11. avatar Kristie says:

    The big benefit of TUSC right now is for smaller online merchants, because PayPal, Stripe, CoinPayments, and other popular payment services don’t allow gun sales. It’s also well positioned as a backup plan for other retailers who could lose their merchant account or face large fee increases with little to no recourse.

    1. avatar arc says:

      Paypal has a beef with R18/adult artists as well, so crypto is a great backup, Payoneer as well.

  12. avatar kahlil says:

    Shouldn’t this be tagged as a sponsored post? The level of salesmanship from “posters” connected to TUSC speaks of such.

    1. avatar The Crimson Pirate says:

      I have no connection to TUSC or any other crypto other than owning some bitcoin and Litecoin.

      Maybe we should instead call out the “sponsorship” of federal reserve notes seen here. In case you haven’t noticed FRNs and the banking system that uses them are part of the same government that clearly intends to seize our arms and reduce us under absolute despotism.

  13. avatar Mad Max says:

    In God we trust; all others pay in US paper currency.

  14. avatar Qshinobi says:

    TUSC is a great project.

    As someone who is both a fan of firearms, and crypto currencys, I have been excited about this project for some time.

    Anyone who is in favor of maintaining their gun rights should support this project because it decentralizes access to firearms.

    Imagine you wake up one morning and read that major credit cards will no longer allow you to use their cards to shop at your local gun shop, you wouldn’t have much recourse other than to rant on Twitter or Facebook, but TUSC was created to combat that implicit attack on your 2nd amendment rights.

    1. avatar arc says:

      Twitter and facebook will just shadowban your comments. Its on my to-do list to see what the legalities are of having two prices for the same item, one in FIAT and one in constitutional money.

    2. avatar Sam Hill says:

      You are wrong. Here’s the recourse. Cancel that card company and all like it. Save up your money, under the mattress. Get off your lazy ass and walk, run, or drive to your local mom and pop gun store and buy what you like, or, until it changes, better yet go to a gun show, buy what you want. No paper trail. And if you think the government can’t track or trace anything and everything on the internet, let me sell you some sampesos a c-note each.

      1. avatar The Crimson Pirate says:

        What is Wiemar Republic money going for these days? How about Zimbabwe’s currency? Somali paper currency was appreciating mildly after the UN withdrawal and the collapse of the warlords the UN was supporting. But now that the other Africans have imposed a government on it the money if not worth much anymore. Confederate dollars have risen in value nicely, but good luck finding a gun shop that will take them. How about Argentine Pesos? Nope, those are in the crapper too. Sometime soon your US dollars will follow all of these into the dustbin of history. Then what?

        1. avatar arc says:

          God, Guns and Gold.
          Beans, Bullets, Bandages, fruit trees, perennial plants for every season, farm tools, family and friends labor to conduct FOB operations. When a new stable economy is running, convert gold into the new currency. Gold and silver are not for barter when time are bad, they are for preserving your wealth through the bad times to the new good times.

  15. avatar PTM says:

    A fool and his money are soon parted.

    1. avatar arc says:

      Which is why I don’t hold onto IOU/FRNs, even in a CD account, the interest can’t keep up with the inflation rate. Of the little buying power the FRN had in 1990, its lost HALF of that power today, only a fool would hold them and let his wealth slowly bleed away.

      I prefer manufactured goods, fruit trees, good tools. Any “extra” income goes into ammo, precious metals, or something that I will use, such as laundry soap, dish soap, toilet paper, buy it now and it will cost you less than in another ten years.

  16. avatar Edgar Gomez says:

    Can y’all recommend me a book for me to learn all of this. I’m very intrigued

    1. avatar The Crimson Pirate says:

      All of which?

      For economics start here
      https://mises.org/library/what-has-government-done-our-money

      It is free and available in a variety of formats. Then read all the rest of Rothbard’s stuff and move on to other authors from there. mises.org has tons of free books and information, articles, etc.

      For crypto, do a web search and you will get hundreds of articles and pages explaining it.

  17. avatar mercutio says:

    Crypto currencies are the new junk bonds.

    Caveat emptor.

    1. avatar Rob McNealy says:

      Not true at all.

      TUSC is not a bank. We can’t make loans. There is no central repository. We don’t control anything. There would be nothing for the taxpayers to bail out.

      We are a essentially a non-profit community building a solution for retailers that have an issue. It may not be a thing for you, and that’s OK. We like your 1911, but those new fangled Glocks are OK too.

      We also don’t pitch TUSC as an investment either. It’s a digital currency. We would be very happy for the price to stay right where it is, just as long as people were using it.

  18. avatar Wally1 says:

    Why do we have money? Because it’s difficult to buy a cow and carry the two goats you own to do the exchange. Currency is based on trust. My personal issue with crypto currency is trust. Same reason I never took a check from anyone. A check is a IOU, why take a check from someone you don’t know, a bank will not back it. I always told people that wanted to pay me for a product with a check to haul their ass down to their bank and get cash, cause I don’t take checks. Cash is good everywhere. I also try never to buy a large ticket item that is new, (like a vehicle) there is no bargaining power for me. I have also severely restricted my credit card use. If I want something, I save up cash and just buy it. If I can’t buy it with cash, I can’t afford it! Wow, imagine that. This mind set has served me very well. It just slays me watching someone in line at a coffee shop paying for a cup of coffee with a credit card. Really, you don’t have 3 bucks in your pocket?. There is an additional humorous plus by paying cash, watching the college educated cashier attempting to figure out what change to give back. Losers. Just my .23 cents worth (adjusted for inflation).

    1. avatar Arc says:

      A personal check is good for local use. I’m out in the countryside and there is still a lot of check use out here. I will probably accept checks rather than credit cards because merchant accounts and credit card companies fleece you. It may be more cost effective to eat the occasional bad check than to pay a monthly subscription for a merchant account and get robbed with transaction fees. Certified checks are a great option for online orders. Cash is of course still the king.

      Crypto isn’t owned by any one person, its literally just a set of rules that the users agree upon. There are dozens of good currency tokens, all with different voting rules, rules, methods of issue, etc. I understand crypto, so its easy for me to state which ones I accept for goods and services. Naturally its spot price to the federal reserve note.

      If you wanted to adjust for inflation, it would be closer to $2.00

  19. avatar Will Drider says:

    NO! Why have other crypto currency gone down the shitter? Why have other crypto currencies LOST VALUE?

    Anybody had a credit card declined because it was a firearm related purchase?
    Credit card companies have always tracked usage and commercial sold that info. Think they don’t know how often you pay a bar tab, massage parlor, buy casino chips use online betting, pay lawyer fees, pay tickets or hit the liquor store pot dispensary or recreational pot store?

    Cash, Cash and CASH!

    1. avatar Rob McNealy says:

      That’s great advice for lots of things. However, that doesn’t help a shop or manufacturer in Wyoming sell something to a person in Florida.

      That doesn’t help a guy in Michigan trying to get a specific or rare part from a guy in Tennessee.

      Those are the problems we are addressing with TUSC.

  20. avatar Red says:

    So, for this to work for businesses, it has to have a stable value. That’s been the problem with Bitcoin and the rest. How can you use them for everyday transactions when the value is a moving target?

    1. TUSC can easily and instantly be swapped to Bitcoin or dollars. As more people use it, the value will become more stable.

      1. avatar Blue says:

        If retailers wanted Bitcoin in the first place they would just accept its shortcomings. And TUSC can be instantly swapped to dollars? I don’t think so…

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