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Here comes another “smart gun” device that wants to disrupt the firearms business and bring fast, reliable safety technology to the masses. Truefire LLC has developed a patented elctronic firearm locking system that’s activated either by fingerprint, RFID, or a mechanical key.

Truefire’s lock replaces a standard grip on an AR-15 rifle. The lock disables the rifle via a locking bar that’s positioned behind the trigger, preventing an unauthorized user from pulling it.

Once the unit is unlocked, the tension on the bar is eased, allowing the trigger to be pulled. Watch this video . . .

Truefire tells us they’re targeting the locks toward law enforcement use first for the AR and X26P tasers with models coming down the road for common pistol models.

From Truefire’s investor deck . . .

The weapons industry has not succeeded because they are not a tech company. They live in the early 19th century in terms of manufacturing and have done little to innovate that process let alone enter the tech field.

Developing a smart weapon is a daunting task for a company that has no proficiencies in tech or electronics, let alone applications development. Technology has finally achieved a state of robustness, responsiveness, and advancement that can now be deployed in firearms successfully.

Truefire LLC is comprised of a group of innovators, creators, and industry tech professionals with a combined 75-plus years of experience designing and developing software and hardware solutions, and is well poised to lead the firearms market.

The unit in these photos is a test and development version which is missing all the refinements, production seals, and production pieces from the current version of the design.

Truefire technology is a complete smart weapon lock management solution, designed and developed for law enforcement, military, and the consumer market.

LEO and military firearms weapons are often stored in police and military automobiles and left unchecked. These weapons are subsequently the most vulnerable to being stolen and used in crimes against police and civilians.

Our product has been put through rigorous testing and performance evaluations. This is not just another biometrics/RFID lock that can be easily defeated

Truefire says the’ve gotten a lot of interest from law enforcement agencies and they’re currently involved in a capital raise (see here) to get the product into the next phase of production.

Truefire has promised to get us one to test once they’re in production. Stay tuned.

 

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74 COMMENTS

      • 1-2 minutes with a dremel tops, 30 seconds with a right angle grinder if I don’t care about the grip being kept. Perhaps even less if it’s susceptible to magnets in the right places….

      • No, that’s the way SV works. Devise pie-in-the-sky product. Claim it mitigates climate change, promotes social justice, or solves gun violence. Line up the VCs. Hire the developers. Change your company’s charter so you get all the preferred stock and your employees get jack. Launch IPO. Retire to a private island. Just don’t commit actual fraud. Unrealistic claims are okay.

    • Work for 2-3 hours in y0ur spare time and get paid 1200 0n y0ur bank acc0unt every week… Get m0re inf0rmation 0n f0ll0wing site… 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐤𝐣𝐨𝐢𝐧.𝐭𝐤

    • Oh, we’ll have these in the books here n California by tomorrow. We already have microstamping, a pie-in-the-sky technology, why not this.

  1. It will be interesting to learn if the unit has been tested to failure, or simply tested to see that the device works. My limited experience with software development is that “test to failure”, if done at all, is simply commandeering the buyers to act as field testers.

    “Murphy’s law” seems to escape notice of all too many “…in tech or electronics,…” The Boeing 737 Max fiasco was created by people with “…proficiencies in tech or electronics,…”

    There are many in the gun community who do not see the importance of abusing firearms under ridiculous conditions, because those conditions are very unlikely to ever exist in rea life. Always struck me as an arrogant position to take.

    • “My limited experience with software development is that “test to failure”, if done at all, is simply commandeering the buyers to act as field testers.”

      Yep. Beta testers

      • “Tested to comply with fed grant app.”

        Given that condition, “success” would be measured by how many times a smart gun stops the owner from being able to use the gun.

  2. A) No
    B) That is the ugliest thing I have ever seen and even showing it off as a prototype is dumb dumb dumb
    C) He can’t even get it to work properly in the video. He has to reposition the ring to make it unlock.

  3. Send it to the lockpicking lawyer. He has a whole series of videos on YouTube where he gets guns out of locks including police vehicle locks in just seconds

  4. …ummmm, so – take off the “locked” handle and replace it with a stock version. Or, what’s to stop someone from literally crushing the stop-bar into the unlocked position?

  5. There’s always some stupid idiot trying to make a buck that keeps folks from defending themselves. Just as stupid as voting for red flag laws. FOOLS.

  6. I didnt know clops were having that big of a problem with gunms.
    I doubt I will see this around my area, we need more Taxpayers .

  7. Solid pass. First, my thumbprint gets ground to a point that is unrecognizable to my phone after dusty desert shooting. Also, my thumbprint disappears with tac gloves. RFID can be jammed, and heavy metal rings also interfere with my shooting. A key lock? I could get on target faster than Mr Miculek if he had to unlock an AR with a key.

  8. Assuming SHOT Show actually happens and isn’t ‘virtual’ like it was last year, this is straight from Truefire’s website:
    “Coming to Shot Show January 18-21, 2022 – Booth #41930”

  9. The only police departments that are going to even be remotely interested are the ones run by city Councils that wants them disbanded

  10. This unit sounds like it has a active and not a passive RFID chip. The frequency range would be around 860 to 950 MHz if they use the current frequency allocations. They may be allowed another frequency band and since the power output is less than 4 watts they probably will. A device the size of a small battery charger for a cell phone could generate the frequency and power range required to activate the RFID and at a long distance. Think of your key FOB for your vehicle.

    If they use just a simple radio frequency anyone could defeat it. If they use a carrier signal with coded data, it would be harder to break. Even with a coded signal, like a garage door opener, many are similar and will unlock other units. And those signals can be detected and copied. Happens everyday and the devices are found on Amazon and Ebay.

    Will the average moron know how to do this? No. But the average kid who has grown up not knowing life before the internet can figure it out easily.

  11. The idea that arms development is quagmired in the early 19th century is fundamentally absurd. That’s like saying that electronics are quagmired in the 1950s because they still use ICs and transistors or saying that programming is likewise quagmired in the 50s because the compilers still convert programs into 1s and 0s to execute programs on CPUs.

    • Agreed, but you’re actually being too generous. The electronics analogy you used, while (intentionally) farfetched to serve as a reductio ad absurdum, actually has a basis in truth.

      One could make a case that firearms technology plateaued since the 1950s, or even that many firearm mechanisms date from the late nineteenth century, but there are essentially zero early nineteenth-century designs or even features of designs being produced today, except as nostalgic replicas. Truefire is trumpeting their ignorance of the field at max volume.

      • “Truefire is trumpeting their ignorance of the field at max volume.”

        People with no expertise in firearms, complaining about firearm owners with no expertise in “tech”.

        • Sam I Am,
          Yes, exactly. My synopsis of their announcement:

          “I know absolutely nothing about ‘the weapons industry’, but you should totally trust your life to my new weapon thingy.”

    • I caught this too: “The weapons industry has not succeeded because they are not a tech company…”

      Last I checked, “tech companies” scoop up investor and advertiser money by turning “customers” into products. The tech business model is built upon eavesdropping, theft, censorship, and addiction. The tech industry ruins lives and livelihoods. But sure, let’s all pretend its a good idea to apply this model to firearms. Nothing could possibly go wrong.

      Idiots.

      Bonus idiocy: Try out something like, “The furniture industry has not succeeded because they are not a tech company…” OR “The grocery industry has not…” The statement as written is 1) nonsensical and stupid, and 2) poorly written, e.g. “Industry” vs. “tech company,” (not the same thing) and the bizarre use of “they.”

      Idiots, I say!

  12. Lets not forget even in the Science Fiction book Snow Crash the mini gun froze up and got the guy killed. A delving into the best science fiction weapons could be a fun undertaking. The whole black humor in Snow Crash around Reason was awesome, not to mention the weapon its self.

  13. I’m pretty sure the firearms industry HAS been effective…..in building weapons that work……Not morphadyte pieces of crap destined to fail in a spectacular fashion.

    I guess they will have a limited future starring in sci-fi movies about a dystopian future.

  14. “Revolutionary” That’s a red flag but by all means, CALL OR CLICK TODAY!

    On a serious note, I only buy things that say commercial or heavy duty…like my washing machine.

  15. The weapons industry has not succeeded because they are not a tech company. They live in the early 19th century in terms of manufacturing and have done little to innovate that process let alone enter the tech field.

    Man, that’s going to sound really dumb when some thug who flunked the eighth grade defeats your smart lock with a hacksaw.

  16. Hi this is the lock picking lawyer and I’m about to break this piece of shit biometric hand guard in about 5 seconds.
    One, two, there it goes. With a screwdriver. Three seconds.

  17. My standard remark at cash registers and other gadgets that are acting up applies:

    Isn’t modern technology wonderful, when it works?

  18. That’s silly, everyone knows it didn’t work in the video because the gentleman didn’t have his monthly “booster jab”. A requirement to allow the firearm to be enabled.
    🤣

  19. At best, this prevents immediate misuse by someone who disarms a cop. If someone has time with the gun, a Dremel cutting wheel will chop the blocking arms off in less than 5 minutes and turn it back to a regular gun. That assumes you can’t just take the grip off. Untold man hours to create this abomination, 10 seconds to figure out a way around it. This is why “smart guns” will never work.

  20. A device the puts forward pressure on the trigger until it is unlocked? How much forward pressure does it place on the trigger when it’s unlocked? Did Truefire just create a safety device that can operate as a bumpfire device?

  21. “Truefire LLC is comprised of a group of innovators, creators, and industry tech professionals with a combined 75-plus years of experience designing and developing software and hardware solutions, and is well poised to lead the firearms market.”

    That they may be, but they are NOT gun people. From the very beginning of the video, the demonstrator is showing the product by……. wait for it………. pulling the trigger while the gun is pointed behind him!

    I seem to have some vague recollection of a rule or something about “Always point[ing] the firearm in a safe direction.”

    I’m totally UNimpressed

    • “Truefire LLC is comprised of a group of innovators, creators, and industry tech professionals with a combined 75-plus years of experience designing and developing software and hardware solutions, and is well poised to lead the firearms market.”

      I hate it when companies put out the combined number of years in relation to a groups experience for a specific “subject matter”. Its an old trick to appeal to stupid people, the trick is its a way of hiding dissimilar functionalities which includes “subject matter” incompetence while trying to look competent and “well versed and experienced” for a specific subject matter.

      I’ll bet if you examined each of these people included in this “75-plus years of experience” you will find people who are grossly incompetent, have very little true in-depth knowledge of the subject matter, and are trying to apply what they do know to a new endeavor none of them have any experience with.

  22. Ironic that it’s already defeated before it’s roll out.

    Just another Pie in the Sky device that won’t change a damn thing.

  23. I read all the comments. I can’t argue any of them. Still, I wouldn’t mind having one or two of these to play with.

    Can I defeat it? Without a doubt. Can random dumbass defeat it? Maybe. If some female arrives on scene, with a horde of toddlers in tow, will it stop the toddlers? Almost certainly, based only on what I’ve seen in the video. In fact, it will probably stop the female who brought the toddlers into my kitchen unannounced. (few females that I have met carry diagonal cutters in their purses)

    But, this is less a question of “will it stop anyone”, than, “might this lock relieve me of liability in the case of an accident, theft, or unauthorized use?”

    As I say, I’d like to have a couple to play with. Will it rust? Will a little dirt or grime stop it working? I don’t wear gloves, so no worry on that count, but what about dirty fingers? Can I duplicate that ring fob? How difficult would that be? Could someone duplicate the ring fob in a manner that overrides one gun, or multiple guns? And, again, how hard would that be?

    TLDR: I’m not dismissing it out of hand, but I’m not ready to approve of it either.

  24. SERIOUSLY. That’s the dumbest safety system ever. Yes it probably works good to keep your 5 year old from using it. But anyone who has criminal intent with a pair of vise grips or a moto tool will have access to the use of the firearm in minutes. SERIOUSLY. For this to work it would take a purposely built receiver with the lock inside, a non removable trigger group and hand grip tha can’t be removed or replaced by the standard grip.
    Seriously I just did their rethink for them.
    As a child safe system it has merit. As a deterrent against the criminal elements NOT.

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