Riton’s New 5 Tactix 1-6×24 Thunder Ranch LPVO

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From Riton . . .

Riton Optics is proud to introduce the 5 Tactix 1-6×24 Thunder Ranch! A rugged, versatile and feature-rich low power variable optic (LPVO), developed in partnership with the legendary Clint Smith from Thunder Ranch.

Designed and engineered to withstand the rigors of extreme use, while offering class-leading clarity, Riton Optics built the 5 Tactix 1-6×24 Thunder Ranch riflescope specifically for Modern Sporting Rifle (MSR) platforms. Riton Optics, Clint and the Thunder Ranch team put their minds together to build this optic, so users can shoot with confidence knowing that this optic has earned the right to wear the Thunder Ranch Shield and Lightning Bolt!

The true 1x to 6x Second Focal Plane (SFP) optical system of the 5 Tactix 1-6×24 Thunder Ranch was engineered to offer shooters distortion-free target acquisition with both eyes open at 1x, for quick and accurate engagements at close to medium range. Rotate the integrated throw lever to 6x, and shoot with confidence at extended ranges while maintaining a crystal clear field of view.

Equipped with the all-new “THR” bullet drop compensator reticle, the 5 Tactix 1-6×24 Thunder Ranch was optimized specifically for the 55gr. 5.56/.223 shot out of a 16″ barrel. Precise aiming points for 25, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 yards, along with 5 and 10 MPH wind holds, provide shooters the confidence needed to make precision shots out to 500 yards without ever touching the dial.

Activate the daylight bright, green illuminated reticle by turning the 6-step illumination knob on the left side of the optic to the desired brightness. Additionally, the 5 Tactix 1-6×24 Thunder Ranch also features an off setting between each brightness level so the reticle can be turned off quickly when desired.

Precise and tactile windage and elevation adjustments on the 5 Tactix 1-6×24 Thunder Ranch are easily achieved via the low profile 2/10 MRAD zero resettable turrets housed under the robust machined aluminum turret caps.

The one-piece aluminum 30mm main body tube of the 5 Tactix 1-6×24 Thunder Ranch riflescope keeps the weight to 22.2oz, while offering the rugged lifetime durability Riton Optics is known for.

“Anyone that knows me, knows I run my gear hard, and that includes my scopes. Simply put, these scopes work, and they last. Enough said.”

– Clint Smith, Founder & CEO of Thunder Ranch

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34 COMMENTS

  1. From the manufactures website.

    “The Thunder Ranch 1-6Γ—24 was developed in conjunction with the infamous Clint Smith.”

    Um… I really hope they just don’t know what the word ‘infamous,’ actually means.

    I mean… has no one over at Riton Optics seen “The Three Amigos”?

    • Really. πŸ‘
      That’s a couple hundred less than I paid for a new Trijicon AccuPower 1-8×28 LPVO in 2019.

      I’m a fan of CS and TR, but that price seems steep.

      • The blowout of the 1-8x Accupowers and 1-8.5x SMRS scopes was pretty legendary… I got two, and I sorta wish it had been three. They’re hefty and don’t have amazing illumination, but they perform really well in almost every other area.

        • πŸ‘
          Wish I had grabbed a 2nd one too.

          It’s got the best 1x of any LPVO I’ve experienced.
          Shooting it like an RDS (both eyes open, moving, sweeping) the perimeter ‘shadow’ of the scope completely disappears.
          When mounted the proper distance from the dom eye (and with some trigger time) you just see the ‘donut of death’ floating in space.

    • Was referring to the 1st pic in the story.

      The 2nd pic shows it actually being fired, and mounted in the proper position. Around 4″ of eye relief. An acceptable distance.

        • πŸ‘
          That 1st pic (non-cantilever mount) looks like someone who doesn’t shoot mounted the LPVO. If the optic is over an inch behind the charging handle, something is not right. That would be the non-cantilever mount.

    • I shot a friends SE before purchasing the Trijicon 1-8×28. Seemed OK.
      Shot them both back to back in low light (dusk), the Trijicon excelled at spotting hogs along the brush line, the SE was unable to gather/transfer enough light to spot them.

      The SE owner upgraded to a Trijicon LPVO soon after that side by side comparison.

  2. @Dan

    Exactly was wrong with posting Rittenhouse related news that provoked purging my post several hours after the fact?

      • Let me clarify.. in 2000 Riton started making their scope optics in USA, somewhat. The newer stuff is manufacturered in USA but the glass is from Japan and some of the parts are from China. The older stuff was manufacturered in either China or Japan.

        All of the design and engineering is done in Tucson, Arizona

        • There is no firearm optic on the market that is truely entirely made in USA. They all use components that are from other countries.

          Its a loophole in the law that allows them to claim made in USA even though they might use parts made in, for example, China. So it can be “legally” true for them to claim and label and advertise ‘Made in USA’ even though its not actually true.

          That’s right… if you have a firearm optic made in the last 20 years and it was claimed to be made in USA… well, in the parts and component sense not so much really.

        • Not 2000.. that should have been 2020… sorry bout that.

          in 2020 Riton started making their scope optics in USA, somewhat…

  3. SFP on a LVPO is stupid. “Precise aiming points for 25, 100 …” is only true for one zoom setting, and useless at the rest. Realistically, there are 2 settings: 1x where you use the illuminated ring, and 6x where you can use the etching.

    • SFP on an LPVO is reasonable on a 1-6, because it is highly likely you are gonna be zoomed to 6x on most shots that require a drop (300yds and out). It also makes it easier to integrate decent illumination.

      On a 1-8 or higher, I do prefer FFP, though.

  4. Why are these things ALWAYS advertised with a totally unnessessary Semi-Auto and to what purpose.? Just another wet dream for some socially inadequate wannabe Rambo looking to save Merica form an imaginery enemy or the simple chance to slot somebody. What does America want yet another addition to a man killing a instrument for anyway because that’s the ONLY real purpose for a semi-auto in the first place. Real hunters use three or five shot Bolt actions of a legal and suitable calibre . Indeed most of the Semi’s on sale appear to me to be under calibre for hunting. BY the way there is NO MILITARY NOMENCLATURE ASSAULT RIFLE or at least I’ve never seen one and I servedin the Military for nigh on two decades both as an ARMOURER/ SMALLARMS INSTRUCTOR in the Royal Air force and as a Reservist in the UK Army Infantry . ASSAULT RIFLE is yet another wet dream marketing ploy We had rifles, Lee-EnfieldNo4 .303 , 7.62 NATO SLR. and 5.56 NATO SA80. 9mm NATO sub machine guns , handguns, LMG’s and GPMG’s but no bloody ASSAULT RIFLES.

    • @Albert L J Hall

      “Why are these things ALWAYS advertised with a totally unnessessary Semi-Auto and to what purpose.? Just another wet dream for some socially inadequate wannabe Rambo looking to save Merica form an imaginery enemy or the simple chance to slot somebody.”

      That, right there is all you had to say to demonstrate your ignorance on the entire subject. The rest of your ignorant word salad with your lies was not necessary.

      “BY the way there is NO MILITARY NOMENCLATURE ASSAULT RIFLE…”

      100% False.

      All NATO countries have a “MILITARY NOMENCLATURE ASSAULT RIFLE”, all country military forces in the world have a MILITARY NOMENCLATURE ASSAULT RIFLE. Its defined in their specs for their military rifles. For the U.S. military, basically, its defined as a rifle that can meet the specs of material and use under military conditions for a military use of military battle and is capable of at least three round automatic fire or fully automatic fire.

      The civilian grade MSR is not an assault rifle under U.S. Government defined standards, it is not made to meet the specs of material and use under military conditions for a military use of military battle and is capable of at least three round automatic fire or fully automatic fire. The term ‘mil-spec’ does not mean the civilian grade MSR meets the specs of material and use under military conditions for a military use of military battle and is capable of at least three round automatic fire or fully automatic fire. There is no commercially made civilian grade MSR that will meet the specs of material and use under military conditions for a military use of military battle and is capable of at least three round automatic fire or fully automatic fire.

      The term ‘assault rifle’ applied to the civilian grade MSR is a false application that has no foundation in law or constitutionally. It is purely a political term used by anti-gun to demonize what is essentially a normal semi-auto rifle using technology concepts that are almost 200 years old now with military style cosmetics.

      • AH is too stupid to realize his comments about the ‘assault’ term makes him glow.

        Here’s his marching orders………
        https://www.nationalreview.com/news/ap-style-guide-reminds-reporters-to-avoid-using-assault-weapon-calling-term-highly-politicized/

        This term is no longer being used because the anti-gunners are moving the goal post once again. It’s their favorite move.

        Now that maximum negative sentiment for the old term has been achieved (yeah, they do public polling to measure sentiment of terms/words), they flip that negative sentiment the sheeple ‘feel’ onto the ‘new’ term/word.

        Look no further than the subjects opening sentence for the ‘new’ term/word they want the negative sentiment directed to.
        πŸ€”
        What is his opening lamention?
        Semi-autos.

        Like I said, glows!

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