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A new, unconventional suppressor was introduced yesterday called “The Mute.” Any suppressor is interesting to those who can and will choose to shoot politely, not least because they’re good for public health. But this non-metallic silencer is somewhat more intriguing because of its design, materials and the way it’s manufactured.

The Mute is made with a proprietary polymer and is reportedly built using a process referred to as an “Advanced Form 3D Print.” The material used is called D28. It’s incorporated into a “unibody construction” style which they advise will “…reduce recoil and regulate the heat for less mirage, muzzle rise, and blowback.”

The Mute is a non-metallic silencer made with an aerospace polymer.
The Mute is a non-metallic silencer made with an aerospace polymer. That material reportedly mitigates the heat a silencer would normally generate while the design reduces sounds without the use of baffles.

Essentially the new can will reduce both sound and temperature. In fact, the manufacturer claims it will remain “mild to the touch” during use, and you can remove The Mute after firing.

It does so, they aver, using the silencer‘s “Thermal Shroud” function, which utilizes something called the Venturi Effect to mitigate heat. The Thermal Shroud results in what they describe as self thermoregulation:

As the bullet travels through the mute, gases are focused out the front vent, bringing cool air in from the rear. The more rounds you fire the more air is cycled through allowing the Mute to cool faster.

The intended purpose is to not trap and cool, rather direct gas through the thermal shroud. The improved thermal shroud instead uses a venturi effect to mitigate the heat. The average temperature is 97f – 120f even with intense rapid-fire. The exterior wall is tame to the touch allowing you to remove the Mute even after intensive shooting compared to traditional suppressors.

It will be interesting to see if it works as they claim. If not, it’ll provide some good inspiration for someone’s sci-fi military fiction story.

Mute-Silencer
No one who really knows much about cans (or firearms) would be likely to suggest a “best suppressor” without knowing some particulars of intended use…but it’s not too far of a stretch to wonder if The Mute might not be, at least for a time, the lightest QD suppressor available.

Initial calibers available will be .22LR, 5.56mm, and 9x19mm Parabellum. Alas, nothing for you Goat Gun collectors yet.

Mute-Silencer-Calibers

The Mute is currently priced at $599. Learn more at the-mute.com.

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25 COMMENTS

    • “$600 to make my firearm quite would make my wife very loud”

      But with it, you can make her quiet in perpetuity, and have a better chance of getting away with it… ๐Ÿ™‚

    • $600 is actually a decent price for a 5.56 can (that can apparently go on 5โ€ barrels according to theirs website).

      Donโ€™t forget your $200 tax too.

    • …it’s fair to say the stated numbers are not accurate. For instance, just the bolt closing on an AR-15 is about 115 dB. Their 119 dB rating isn’t possible. Like, it’s not possible within the laws of physics. Even if the gunshot itself made zero noise at all you’d exceed 119 dB fairly substantially just with the supersonic crack of the bullet. The sort of sound meter used is also not capable of capturing the very short peak impulse of a gunshot (sampling rate isn’t high enough), so even if it were capable of measuring sound impulse as high as it needs to, it would miss the correct max reading.

      All that said it sounds like a really interesting product and I’m certainly intrigued! I reached out to them to see if TTAG can get its hands on a review loaner(s). Hopefully they don’t see this comment and decide I’m too much of an ass to review it haha. No disrespect meant and, as everything always does, it’ll get a totally fair review that won’t be colored by at least the 5.56 suppressor’s dB stats being unrealistic (which is NOT an unusual thing in the silencer industry, FWIW).

      • I always thought that if the baffles were put to work as in made to rotate as a mini turbine with progressive tighter restrictive vanes the pressure would dissipate more radiply. Creating a quiet can instead of a sound suppressor. The turbine theory coupled with the vortex has the potential of reinventing the suppressor.
        Lighter, cheaper, more effective\efficient, cooler and much simpler to produce.
        This is pure genius, using science instead of back yard garage mechanics.
        We are finally getting somewhere.

        • I always thought that if the baffles were put to work as in made to rotate as a mini turbine with progressive tighter restrictive vanes the pressure would dissipate more radiply. Creating a quiet can instead of a sound suppressor. The turbine theory coupled with the vortex has the potential of reinventing the suppressor.
          Lighter, cheaper, more effective\efficient, cooler and much simpler to produce.
          This is pure genius, using science instead of back yard garage mechanics.
          We are finally getting somewhere.
          Its the difference between the jet turbine and the ram jet.

        • Check out the OSS suppressors. They use baffleless flow through design that they liken to a reverse jet engine.

  1. Interesting concept!

    It appears that we have a .22 LR only suppressor (Model: F4-M22) that cannot be disassembled for cleaning. Owning two multi-cartridge .22 cans I can testify that they do get DIRTY. Nothing in the advertising copy on their website indicates that it can be used for other than .22 LR (ie. 17 Mach2, 17 HMR, 17 WSM, .22 Magnum, 5.7×28). At $599.00 (introductory sale price…$799.00 MSRP) that is an expensive .22 LR only can.

    Nothing about longevity…nothing about how durable the blast chamber is…no hard data to help people make an informed decision on how to spend their suppressor money.

    They do offer a Limited Lifetime Warranty on their products.

    • Why do we still even have these useless discussions? They are going to be banned anyway under one of the new Administration’s multiplicities of firearms laws coming soon, to a theater near you. So you won’t have to worry about how good or expensive they are, you won’t be able to have them. That was why they were made NFA items in the first place, so they could seize them conveniently when the time came. Oh, and don’t think they’ll refund your tax stamp money either. Why are silencers/suppressors still a class-3 registered item and not just an over the counter or build your own accessory? What ever happened to that ‘hearing protection Act’ that was on fire for a while under Trump? I’ll bet most of you don’t know why this is?

    • I wonder why they are all the same price (5.56, 9mm, .22) considering the different sizes/quantity of material.

      Really curious about durability…

      • Just a guess…3D printing is cheaper than CNC or human machinists. They’re setting introductory price high to see what kind of interest / response they generate…prices subject to revision depending on response.

        The cynic in me says their business philosophy may be…Caveat Emptor.

        As I said earlier, interesting (unproven) concept.

  2. Would be interested to know the durability of this silencer. Especially where the initial blast hits it. I’m guessing the cooling air is coming from the barrel?

  3. Their numbers in their demonstration video are highly suspect. As soon as a new product from a new manufacturer comes out making incredible claims and using suspect data, labeled “for demonstration purposes only” or not, I start holding my breath until their bubble bursts. I haven’t died yet.

    That said, it’s a terrible idea. Eventually I’m going to have a stroke or die when one of these whiz bangs actually puts it’s money where it’s mouth is. I should reconsider my options. Maybe just breathe while I wait for the inevitable. Yeah, that’s the ticket. Anywho, I hope they turn out to be awesome but the enemy government in power at the moment will probably label them “ghost cans” because they don’t trip a metal detector.

    Feel free to entertain yourselves with “ghost cans” jokes and sexual innuendo.

    Noooo…in YOUR endo! Heh heh heh

  4. I wonder if they will be letting PEW Science have a whack at characterization.

    Overall it seems like an interesting concept, but, one thing I wonder about in the context of cleaning … how well would one of these do in an ultrasonic cleaner with solvent? (As in, would it just melt away?) For that matter, how well do they stand up to typical cleaning chemicals?

  5. Those decibel ratings seem way out of whack. Maybe the .22 figure, but the 9 is too low even for 147s. I’m very skeptical about 5.56 metering at 119; thats like a 50db reduction; I don’t think I’ve EVER heard of a 5.56 can metering that low.

    And that’s not even addressing the elephant in the room, the temperature claims, which are somehow even more fanciful. A rifle can that remains cool to the touch under extended firing schedules? I’d grant that a venting system could provide some reduction in retained heat, but it would be on the order of 10-20% less heat, not a near complete elimination. I’d like to see the owner hold one barehanded through 2 mags dumps…

    It appears these guys never learned underpromise>overdeliver…

  6. No manufacturer name……bizarre.
    Vague contact info on website.
    Google shows two businesses: a wedding/event venue and a golf course clubhouse.
    Google Maps shows a small home.

    No ATF FFL listing for “30510 E 63rd St. Broken Arrow, OK 74014”

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