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Welcome to my TED Talk.

 

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24 COMMENTS

    • “Oh I bet she could feel the concussion🙄”

      She could, while cute, the meme is a *little* off… 🙁

  1. actually, strangely enough, blind and deaf people are not immune to flash bangs or weapons for ‘light’ or sound. They can have their physical hearing and sight ‘mechanism’ (physical eyes and ears) damaged just like sighted and hearing people can. Blind and deaf may not ‘perceive’ the ‘explosion’ or sound, but the ‘explosion or sound produces energy that can inflict physical damage on the ears and ears just like it can for sighted or hearing people and that damage can be temporary or lasting just like it can for sighted or hearing people.

    You think you got that tinnitus from weapons fire (yes, even with a suppressor) because your perception was affected? No, you got it because there was actual physical damage to your hearing at some point due to the energy produced by the weapons fire. You may not have noticed it immediately, and sometimes it can take years to show up noticeably (e.g. with prolonged suppressor use and no other hearing protection), but the damage is there.

    • correction for: “…can inflict physical damage on the ears and ears just like it can for sighted or hearing people and that damage can be temporary or lasting just like it can for sighted or hearing people.”

      should have been …

      … can inflict physical damage on the eyes and ears just like it can for sighted or hearing people and that damage can be temporary or lasting just like it can for sighted or hearing people.

  2. Not really. A person is still susceptible to muzzle blast. Muzzle blast gave me a bad case of flinch which I cured by wearing a full face motorcycle helmet with the face mask down when I shot. Shooting out in the open, with no nearby barriers to reflect muzzle blast back at you, helps, too.

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