House metal detector
(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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[Rep. Andrew] Clyde, a Georgia gun store owner, refused to go through the new metal detectors outside the House chamber two times in violation of a new House rule put in place after the Jan. 6 insurrection to ensure that no guns and weapons are brought into the chamber. Breaking the rules cost Clyde $15,000 in fines — $5,000 for the first infraction and $10,000 for the second. 

“That’s OK,” Clyde said of a $15,000 setback. “I’m good with the taking a hit for the team. But we’re going to win on this and we’re going to have House Resolution 73 declared unconstitutional because it is unconstitutional.”

Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas was also fined $5,000 for skirting the metal detectors. Both Republican members are appealing their fines to the House Ethics Committee.

“It was all preplanned to make sure that we had legal standing,” Clyde told Fox News.

Assuming he loses his appeal in the Ethics Committee, Clyde said he’s prepared to file a lawsuit against Pelosi, Capitol Police and the House Sergeant at Arms to challenge the newly installed magnetometers and to fight for Second Amendment rights at the Capitol.

— Marisa Schultz in GOP rep says he intentionally sidestepped House metal detectors to get legal standing to sue Pelosi

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31 COMMENTS

  1. I think this sends a great signal to all us little people. Clearly, our esteemed representatives have gotten all the peoples’ work done, so they now have time to engage in this performative nonsense.

    • How much time did this take away from legislating, vs. the time spent by reps going through the security checkpoint?

        • No shit, they are currently spending $43,000 per SECOND since sleepy took the wheel (according to CBS news, so I am quite sure it is actually much higher than that)

        • Hey Sherlock! You have to spend money to make money! We’re going to have an increase of One TRILLION dollars to the GDP this year thanks to a two trillion dollar investment. And we’re just getting started. You’re welcome!

      • The amount of legislation passed is not a good barometer of their work ethic. I would rather have 1 quality and Constitutional piece of legislation a cycle instead of 1000s of bad pieces.

    • So you don’t think they ARE doing the people’s work…. you think everyone should just roll over and play dead then, right?? Pretty easy to guess which side of the political fence you’re standing on, Karen.

      • Yeah, one of the things that I hate about this new format…it does a jumbled up shit-show in short order. You almost have to check the timestamps to make sense of the strings.

    • “I think this sends a great signal to all us little people.”

      Speaking for yourself, obviously.

      ‘Cuz you you damn sure ain’t speaking for me… 🙂

  2. I hope they win, BUT self defense is a natural right. Members of Congress are NOT SPECIAL.
    See 14th Amendment; Equal Protection provisions.

      • Well I fckd that up, I guess its do away with resolution 73.
        Lie detectors would leave nothing but the janitors and that’s iffy

        • If the janitorial staff actually took out the trash at least 70% of Congress would be gone (I am likely being more kind than they deserve).

    • After watching the Hank Johnson video, definitely drug test.
      Scary these people are all fckd up and passing laws that affect us.

      • Possum, that’s the sad part, they ignore the oath of office to protect and defend our constitution all the while passing laws that affect “We the People”. But they have no idea how “We the People” live and assume we live just as they with all the frills they enjoy.
        Rights don’t die and that includes the Entire Bill of Rights.

  3. They say they need standing “to fight for Second Amendment rights at the Capitol.” So they intend for their constituents to be able to carry at the capitol? No chance. So why should I care about members of the ruling class fighting for their right to exercise freedoms in a place where they have no intention of allowing we the people to exercise the same freedoms?

  4. Courts will never rule against a legislative body being able to set its own rules.

    I was a co-plaintiff in the suit against the New Hampshire House of Representatives rule (and against the then-Speaker personally), which forbade members from carrying in the House chamber during the 2019-2020 term.

    The state supreme court waffled until an election cycle passed. Republicans regained the majority, rescinded that rule, and the supremes breathed a sigh of relief and promptly ruled the case moot.

    • Kevin B Craig,

      “Courts will never rule against a legislative body being able to set its own rules.”

      I share the same sentiment.

      Now, having said that, a legislative body cannot legitimately/legally enact a rule which “legalizes” sexual assault or criminalizes breathing through your nose. Would the courts rule accordingly if such a case came before them? I would hope so. Would the courts rule accordingly on the similar nature of illegitimately suspending the Second Amendment? Who knows.

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