Teddy Roosevelt Smith & Wesson No. 3 Revolver
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From Rock Island Auction . . .

Former President Theodore Roosevelt’s Smith & Wesson New Model No. 3 Single Action Revolver sold for $910,625 during the first day of Rock Island Auction Company’s (RIAC) December Premier Auction. The second headliner, a 2nd Model Burnside Civil War carbine presented by President Lincoln to Kentucky statesman John Jordan Crittenden for his role in keeping Kentucky and the border states in the Union, sold for $105,750. 

In total, the December Premier Auction realized $18.3 million in revenue, further positioning the company as the No. 1 firearms auction house in the world. The December Premier Auction ran from Friday, Dec. 9 through Sunday, Dec. 11.  

Teddy Roosevelt Smith & Wesson No. 3 Revolver

“Firearms with presidential ties are highly sought after and extremely difficult to find,” said Kevin Hogan, Rock Island Auction Company President. “Being tied to such an important office frequently places these arms at historic moments in American history. We’ve had the responsibility of offering three presidential arms in 2022, which is unheard of, but it never ceases to be something special.” 

Teddy Roosevelt Smith & Wesson No. 3 Revolver

Documentation shows the revolver was shipped to Lt. Colonel Theodore Roosevelt on May 12, 1898, the same day he departed for San Antonio to train the famed Rough Riders.  Roosevelt’s Smith & Wesson New Model No. 3 revolver is chambered in a .38 Long Colt, the U.S. service cartridge at the time, but scarcely seen in this particular model.  

The 16th president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, presented Kentucky Statesman John J. Crittenden with the historic Burnside carbine that was manufactured from 1861 to the early part of 1862. Lincoln’s most historic civil war era gun was accompanied by a mahogany trunk and Crittenden memoirs.  

The December Premier Auction showcased thousands of incredibly rare and historic firearms. Additional highlights from the December Premier Auction include the sale of:   

Philip R. Goodwin’s painting “Honest Woods,” ($76,375)  

General Sickles Excelsior Brigade Sword | Rock Island Auction ($88,125)  

Engraved Cased Colt Model 1877 Lightning Double Action Revolver ($323,125)  

For more information on Rock Island Auction Company and other highlights from their December Premier Auction, visit www.rockislandauction.com.   

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26 COMMENTS

  1. If I had the money, I’d have been interested in the Roosevelt revolver. You couldn’t give me anything touched by Lincoln.

    • Question is…After that unwarranted stupid remark who would want anything you touched?

      Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

      Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

      But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

      Abraham Lincoln
      November 19, 1863

      • Wow, Debbie. That’s a lot. First I must confess, I generally scroll past your comments. I find them redundant. I’m sorry. Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation was symbolic. He did not have control of southern states at the time.It only allowed him to gain political ground in the north at the time. it meant nothing. At the time. Lincoln we no from of the slave. He wanted to deport them. We established a country for them. Most former slaves didn’t want to leave. You talk about Jim Crow laws a lot. I. remember “White’s Only” water fountains and waiting rooms? Do you ? Live in and in person? Experience?

        • Gadsden:
          “I. remember “White’s Only” water fountains and waiting rooms? Do you ?”
          I’m from Michigan, and I’ve only had one experience with Jim Crow when I was in electronics school at Keesler AFB in Mississippi. It was 1960 and I was walking down a city street one day when an elderly black man stepped off the sidewalk to let me pass. I had never seen anything like that before, and I was flabbergasted. I also didn’t like it. As far as i was concerned, that man had every bit as much right to that sidewalk as i did.
          “I’m sorry. Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation was symbolic. He did not have control of southern states at the time.It only allowed him to gain political ground in the north at the time. it meant nothing.”
          Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation was a wartime political move, and yes it was symbolic. He couldn’t free the slaves in the border states that remained in the Union, because he didn’t have the authority. He did, however, push really hard to get the Congress to pass the 13th Amendment, which did free the slaves (except for the people in prison who are essentially slaves). But that is a gripe for another day. Suffice it to say, I think that needs to be fixed.

        • Um Gads, are you claiming superiority here because you enforced whites-only rules?

          These are some dumb comments.

        • Most people have excuses to keep on truckin’ when they cannot debunk what I say and you damned sure cannot do it…especially with your brand of redundant dead horse crap I heard repeated for years.

          Furthermore…I’ve also heard reguritated horse hocky about Lincoln coming from useful idiots like you for years. The source for your horse hockey? That would be the sleazy party that has been attempting for centuries to rewrite history and lay their legacy of slavery, segregation, lynching, Jim Crow, Eugenics and other race based atrocities at the doorsteps of The Party of Lincoln.

          If you cannot hear the democRat Party applauding your spew it’s not too late to ask Santa for one of those machines that flush out clogged up ears.

        • Reply edit…Should be over a century not centuries.

          Furthermore flag…I do not post what I post here without knowing exactly what discrimination is nor do I have to provide you with any “qualifiers.” Especially when its you saying you wouldn’t touch anything Lincoln.

          There was a time with Blacks when if you insulted Lincoln it was along the lines of saying the N-Word. In other words you need to set the way back machine further back than colored drinking fountains to the Civil War and see if you could have ran the show any better and surpassed The Gettysburg Address. Good f-n luck with that.

        • gadsden…I do not post what I post here without knowing exactly what discrimination is nor do I have to provide you with any “qualifiers” especially when it’s you saying you wouldn’t touch anything Lincoln.

          There was a time when if you insulted Lincoln it was along the lines of using the N-Word and with mê it still is.

          Perhaps you need to set the way back machine further back than drinking fountains. Try the Civil War era and see if you could have ran the show any better than Lincoln and surpassed his Gettysburg Address.

      • I used to think Lincoln was the 2nd best president until I read “The Real Lincoln” by Thomas Di Lorenzo. Then I realized Lincoln was a tyrant and he set in motion the federal government and all presidents thereafter to commit unconstitutional acts. The U.S. was the only Western Country to fight a civil war to supposedly end slavery. When it was really started by unjust taxation. And I think, because of the Civil War, that racism has never died out and, in some cases, has become greater. The Democrat party has led the way in racist policies since the Civil War ended.

        • Thru, at least the 80s Northern gov’t school indoctrination was that Lincoln was at least demigod. Very often with a life size print of his head handing on the classroom wall. Those that could think (read) figured out that was utter BS. He was at least as flawed as any of our worst presidents and shredded the Constitution.

          Apparently “black” America still think Lincoln was some kind of deity. More gov’t mideducation.

  2. Teddy’s revolver looks like it has never been fired. There is no visible sign of a cylinder lock scratch on it. And… it looks like the bluing is 100% intact.

    • If you zoom in on the pic it actually does have a very faint cylinder scratch and – unless it’s just the light – a couple of small bright spots of bluing wear at the muzzle, above the grip, and near the hammer. Still stunning shape for being all original though.

    • TR liked rifles, I believe. And the caliber wasn’t much. Not surprising if it stayed in the box.

      That design looks to me to be a wonderful plinker/hunter…
      .
      .. love to have a modern re-do.

  3. Classy firearm with a verified history…darn it, if only I had won that billion dollar Powerball (and Yes I would put at least one cylinder full through it…just because)

  4. Wow! I just looked back at yesterday’s comments. I didn’t intend to ignite a debate on racism and Jim Crow. That belongs to Debbie. I do feel I need to clear up a couple of things. Those whites only signs I referred to. I was a child at the time. I couldn’t enforce anything. I live in the only predominately black county in Florida. As a consequence, I have black friends. It’s that or you hate most of the people around you. That takes too much energy.

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