Things That Don’t Suck: Magpul Bipods

Magpul Bipod

Jeremy S. for TTAG

When Magpul first released the aptly named Magpul Bipod in mid-2018, I didn’t get the appeal. It appeared to be effectively all-polymer, and I tend to lean into my bipods and load them up fairly firmly. So I had doubts.

But then I got my hands on one, and my opinion changed 180 degrees. Magpul’s bipods most definitely do not suck.

Magpul Bipod

Jeremy S. for TTAG

When folded, you’ll find that the knurled tension knob is capped on the bottom with a rubber bumper. It’s designed to be used as a monopod when the scenario dictates. And it won’t scratch your hood. Simply turning the tension knob left or right loosens or tightens the bipod’s movement when deployed.

To deploy, just start the legs moving downwards — they don’t lock in the “up” position — and a spring takes over and whips them all the way into place, where they lock securely.

Pushing the button at the top of either leg unlocks them to be folded back up. A quick whack on the top of the legs and they’ll snap right down again.

Magpul Bipod

Jeremy S. for TTAG

Now that the legs are deployed, the bipod will tilt — lean left and right — as well as pan — swivel / rotate. With 50° of tilt available, you may never have to extend a single bipod leg again to compensate for shooting on a side-angled surface.

With 40° of pan, you can track a moving target or quickly transition between targets without having to shift the bipod’s feet. Or, as was the case on my last hog hunt, you can put both bipod feet in the window track of a hunting blind and load up the bipod effectively despite shooting at a sideways angle out of the window.

Thanks to the rapid-deploy legs, the tilting, and the panning, the Magpul bipod is as fast as it gets from sighting your target to putting lead downrange. After over a year using the Magpul units very regularly, I have yet to require screwing with the length of the legs or found myself in a situation where the bipod didn’t tilt or swivel into the exactly, flawlessly perfect position near-instantly. It’s so dang fast on a hunt.

For those who don’t want a panning bipod, one cool feature of the Magpul unit is that you can lock the pan at 0° while still maintaining tilt functionality. Or, if you crank down hard enough on the tension knob, it’ll behave like a fixed bipod. At every tension level from there down to full-on loose it moves smoothly and quietly.

Magpul Bipod

Jeremy S. for TTAG

Should you find yourself needing a little extra height, the legs do, of course, extend. An easy-to-use button on the rear of each leg unlocks it to slide down through seven adjustment notches, moving from 6.3 inches of height to 10.3 inches in half-inch increments.

On a side note (pun intended), with both legs collapsed to their shortest length I was able to balance that Pork Sword pistol in the images while pointed side-to-side on that same roof. The bipod had to be tilted as far as it would go, but that’s how much adjustment we’re talking about here, folks.

I could deploy the bipod, plop down, tilt the gun until it was level, and take my shot (I mean, were it a safe and legal place to shoot, obviously). No messing with leg length adjustments, whether collars or detents, until the gun got level-ish like I would have had to on many other setups. It’s super fast.

Magpul Bipod

Jeremy S. for TTAG

The staggered rubber feet in the Magpul Bipod can be removed by punching out a roll pin. And guess what? Most Atlas pattern bipod feet will fit in their place. So whether you want steel eagle claws or shiny spikes, you’re good to go.

Magpul Bipod

Courtesy Magpul

Made primarily from steel and aluminum with Magpul’s famous polymer overmolded on top, these bipods have proven much stronger than I anticipated. While I’m sure if I loaded one up like a maniac it would break before the significantly larger, heavier, more expensive, slower-to-use, all-metal bipods like an Atlas, I just don’t care anymore.

The Magpul bipod has laughed off everything I’ve put it through, and I’ve broken a couple all-metal ones in the $50 to $125 price range.

The Magpul’s MSRP is only $109.95. Typical retail price, like on Black Collar Arms’ website because it was our obvious #1 suggestion for all-around use, is $99.99.

On top of that, the Magpul Bipod weighs only 11 ounces. Can you believe it? A ridiculous amount of functionality in one of the quickest-to-deploy-and-adjust bipods on the market, which weighs in at a scant 11 ounces and costs just a hundred bucks. It’s a hell of a thing.

Magpul Bipod

Courtesy Magpul

Magpul makes their bipods in both Black and FDE, with four different mounting options available: direct to M-LOK (super sleek), Picatinny rail clamp, ARMS 17S compatible, and Sling Stud QD. That sling stud design is pretty cool, actually, as they’ve truly managed to make it a quick detach sort of a process that’s far easier and faster than anything else on the market designed to clamp to a sling swivel stud.

Magpul Bipod

Jeremy S. for TTAG

In one of the biggest reversals I’ve experienced from my initial assumptions to my as-tested, in-practice opinion, I can most assuredly state that the Magpul Bipod does not suck.

In fact, it’s definitely my favorite bipod on the market for general, hunting, range use, etc. Sure, a PRS setup or a true long-range precision rig will typically benefit from the ability to lock the legs in different positions at the cost of being slower, and will take increased strength at the cost of increased weight. But the straightforward little Magpul Bipod can hold its own in those scenarios and just crushes it otherwise. I’m a big fan.

comments

  1. avatar M1Lou says:

    I agree with this. I really like their bipod and think they did a great job with it. Also for just over $100 online, it’s a pretty good deal. It makes me want to sell my other Harris types and replace them with these.

  2. avatar Dumpster says:

    too bad they didn’t make and OD green. I would of bought 5

    1. avatar SoCalJack says:

      Agreed on ODG!

      1. avatar Jeremy S. says:

        Since they do the rest of their polymer “furniture” stuff in OD Green I bet the bipods are made in it eventually. We do a decent number of K grips and AFGs in ODG so the matching bipod would be nice.

    2. avatar Dan W says:

      Rust-Oleum camo paint and it can be any color you want.

  3. avatar d says:

    Magpul bipods don’t suck IF you like wobble and instability. Harris is MUCH better.

    1. avatar Red in CO says:

      …what? I’m guessing you’ve never actually used one… I’m not a long range shooter but with my buddy’s rifle we were both able to make repeated hits at a thousand yards braced on his Magpul bipod. Zero wobble or slop if any kind

  4. avatar Ken says:

    My only complaint with mine: legs either folded up or down. No intermediate settings, which I find very useful in something like the Atlas.

  5. avatar Martin Smith says:

    Hey, I’ve got the best set of bipods I’ve ever seen, my military issue pods for my M-14. Upon returning to “The World” I put my gear in my foot locker and forgot about it. When I was discharged there they were. That was many years ago (Viet Namn era) but with just a wrench they clamp right onto a Picatinny rail or the barrel of my Mini-14 and they’re better than anything I’ve ever see offered commercially.

  6. avatar Juice says:

    Round Rock Donuts don’t suck, either.

    1. avatar Jeremy S. says:

      Nice. You know your donuts 😉

      1. avatar tsbhoa.p.jr says:

        i’m far more inclined to comment on what appear to be habaneros. i’m jealous that you can grow pepper ~trees~ down there that survive the winter.

        i just noticed that warne is making a bipod now, and while i trust it would be hella sturdy, for a couple hondo less, i’m intrigued more by this one.

  7. avatar strych9 says:

    I don’t really like bipods. I have one on my long range competition rifle but the only time I ever flip the legs down is to hold the rifle in position for cleaning/service. Other than that it’s just something that takes a beating so the stock doesn’t have to.

    Sometimes I think about removing it for the weight savings but then I tell myself that some day I’ll find a situation where I’ll use it and be glad I had it. So far though that’s like a Creedence song. “Some day never comes”.

  8. avatar UpInArms says:

    I bought one of these, and will likely get another one. Excellent bipod. Only one complaint– it needs a quick-release so I can drop the bipod when I want to without reaching into the toolbox.

    1. avatar Jeremy S. says:

      We accomplished that on one build by using a an M-LOK attach QD Pic rail section (from Kinetic Development Group) and the Pic rail attach bipod clamped to that rail section. Then the whole thing clicks on and off 👍

  9. avatar John Galt says:

    Great job on the pics. Where is the lake?

  10. avatar dwb says:

    Wish there was picatinny rail QD version. They sound good, but taking them off and putting them on looks like a real pain.

  11. avatar David Bonomo says:

    Good kit.

  12. avatar Taylor LeBlanc says:

    Definately on the wrong list. This is the worst product Magpul has made in a very long time…

    1. avatar Someone says:

      Can you elaborate, please? According to Jeremy it is a great bipod. What is your experience with it?

    2. avatar BeoBear says:

      I have two of these and will probably put one of the new stud mount models on my hunting rifle. I can’t find anything bad to say about them after using them. Will they compare with bipods in the $400-500+ range? No but these are $100 bipods and a fantastic value.

      I’m curious what in your personal experience with these bipods caused you to make such a claim? Specifically I mean.

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