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GLOCK, GLOCK, GLOCK…it’s all about GLOCK. GLOCK is the Marvel movie of the gun genre. Some whiners claim they release the same product over and over…but here’s the thing. It’s always worth the squeeze and it’s always successful.

The G47 was something of an enigma. It was only available to the contract holder that requested it, the Department of Homeland Security. Exclusivity breeds desire. Nothing makes people want something more than telling them they can’t have it. People have been clamoring for the G47 for a while. I’m not even a certified “GLOCK Guy” but not being able to have a G47 made me want one.

Earlier last year, Border Patrol offered a commemorative model for current and former agents. This had me going through my list of friends to see if I might have a BP agent who owed me a favor…but alas. Now I don’t have to take it that far.

GLOCK has either completed the contract or finally felt it was time to release the famed GLOCK 47 to the general public.

What It Is

It’s a full-sized GLOCK in 9mm. Wait…doesn’t that make it a G17? Well, kind of. It’s a duty-sized GLOCK in 9mm, but look at where the frame ends.

Yep, right before the end of the slide. This signifies a design difference, and that difference allows you to remove the G47’s slide and equip it with a GLOCK 19 frame. That gives you the hybrid we’ve all wanted…a more concealable firearm with you a duty-length barrel.

A big slide and long barrel make the gun easier to shoot. Lower recoil, better accuracy, and the like are beneficial. The smaller frame makes the gun easier to conceal when using an IWB or AIWB holster. This setup makes it easier to carry concealed in a modern IWB or AIWB setup.

On the split side, if you want to use the G47’s frame with a G19 slide to make a GLOCK 19X or G45, you most certainly can do that.

In short, the GLOCK 47 offers a different level of modularity than the GLOCKS before it. Since it’s 2023, the G47 also offers you an MOS-compatible slide so you can put your favorite optic in place.

Is the GLOCK 47 going to break the mold of polymer frame pistols? Probably not, but it’s a nice movement toward modularity, and modularity matters in the modern age.

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27 COMMENTS

    • “Nothing makes people want something more than telling them they can’t have it.”

      Kinda true. I’d like a 10″ barrel AR with a suppressor, please. But muh California…ugh.

      • It’s coming, hang on. Maybe sooner than later. Legal challenges are in progress, to sue to at the least allow NFA ‘toys’ for those in enemy lands…

    • But, but, but, didn’t you read it? The slide to frame fit is slightly different! Man, I know people make fun of 1911 guys for geeking out on minor variations but at least nobody claims its a whole different model gun.

      (Note to the editor. If you are going to point out slide to frame alignment as a key differentiator of one handgun from another, make the intro picture one with the slide closed.)

  1. The biggest problem with Glock modularity is the serialized frame.
    The biggest problem with Sig modularity is the x-change kits cost $50 less than a full gun and the individual part market is being overloaded with Gucci crap like $800 slides and $500 frames.

  2. Glock, glock, glock, guhgglock.
    I say, Isay boy, that chicken done laid an egg.
    You can install bone handled grips to your Glock if you get the frame kinda melty then mash a chicken bone in it.
    It’s a one of a kind because no two chicken bones are the same.
    The GlockCB47

  3. I understand that different length / weight slides require different unlocking geometry.

    What I don’t understand is why – since the locking blocks are removable anyway – they can’t just use those to make everything interchangeable.

    • Why? Because it’s Glock, where the ENTIRE engineering department was eliminated in order to hire more sales / govt.
      contract personnel.

      • That would be an understandable explanation why Glock doesn’t do it. So would a shortsighted fear of self-cannibalization (like SIG).

        OTOH, Glock has one of the biggest aftermarkets in the gun world, so I can’t imagine one of the hundreds of smiths / suppliers not trying this unless there was an actual engineering reason why it’s unfeasible.

        • Vahn Geo,
          Companies advertise modular pistols as being able to fill every niche, but stop short of fully delivering that capability because they’re afraid that it will cannibalize their future sales – i.e. if the first pistol they sell you can be your bedside table, match, bear defense, summer and winter CCW, etc. you won’t want to / have to buy all their other offerings. This is shortsighted because:

          A. As Dude pointed out, the conversion kits cost almost as much as whole pistols; their attraction is that you can buy them without another 4473 and without even getting off your couch.

          B. Much more importantly, the company that could fully deliver this capability would capture market share from everybody else, more than offsetting any lost sales of their other products.

  4. My initial reaction is not interested. but then I blew off the 43x and 48 for 3 or 4 years and then fell in love with them. so maybe I should reserve judgement and take a closer look.

  5. No, it’s not all about Glock. What it’s about is the particular attitude people get on the subject of Glock.

    “…modularity matters in the modern age.”
    These are not AR15’s. What matters is what happens when a prospective buy puts it in their hands for the first time. Some people like it and some don’t. What does it feel like when shot. How well you can handle and control it. So saying this is completely off point.

    “This setup makes it easier to carry concealed in a modern IWB or AIWB setup.”
    This makes no sense at all.

    “It’s always worth the squeeze and it’s always successful.”
    This is subjective.

    • “This setup makes it easier to carry concealed in a modern IWB or AIWB setup.”

      That’s quite a claim for Glock to make. I’d be really interested to know if anyone carries a full size frame Glock AIWB.

  6. I’m sorry, what? I tuned out immediately at the bit about Marvel products being “always worth the squeeze”. No need to repeat yourself, though.

  7. 🥱
    Shot tons of Glocks (first ones in the late ’80s), never felt the urge to add one to my handgun collection. The first poly gun in my collection was a Walther PPQ, next an HK Mark 23, then a Walther P99AS. All are fired suppressed now.

    I’m sure my GA based BIL already has a 47 in his collection. He had WELL over 50 Glocks the last time we spoke, all different models/calibers. He prepays his FFL before new models are released and get one from the first batch in the door. 🙄
    I told him IMHO, that’s like having a massive collection of electric toothbrushes. I’ve never felt the urge to buy another Sonicare until the prior one wore out. 🤔

  8. Gee another Glock 9mm, how unique. I already have a G34, don’t need another one. Difference is .80 inch longer barrel in the G34. The G47 might be fine for a first gun/only 9mm gun. I don’t see the point of this gun for full size Glock 9mm owner.

  9. All this talk about size, but I don’t see a single dimension listed. Or did I miss something? I hate the way Glock people assume everyone knows the various caliber and barrel lengths. They usually just give the Glock designation, expecting you to know the rest.

    • Remember asking about a Glock 40 and being shown a 22. Not as bad as trying to find specific grip modules for a sig 320 as they seem to reinvent the terms and options every 3 years. For some things you are better off searching for product codes or NSN’s.

  10. Next up is the G50- a G17 slide on a G26 frame- followed by the G51- which is a G19 slide on a G26 frame.
    Where’s my money Glock? I just made you millions more in sales, I demand 20% of those future sales

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