Escort’s SD-X 12 Gauge and .410 Modern Sporting Shotguns

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escort SD-X shotgun

From Escort Shotguns . . .

The Escort SD-X is part of Hatsan’s Versatile Tactical Shotgun series. Available in either 12 ga or .410 cal, this modern sporting shotgun is offered in all black or FDE Cerakote. A new gas piston design is mounted around the barrel itself, eliminating the secondary tube that is typically mounted below the barrel of a semi-automatic shotgun. This reduces the weight and bulk of the gun while minimizing felt recoil and muzzle rise. The synthetic polymer lower receiver features an alloy magazine well that ensures a smooth, durable product designed to last.

Hatsan’s patented ThermoDefend forend absorbs and dissipates heat from the barrel while offering a comfortable, controlled grip on the weapon.

An active buffer tube absorbs recoil and sports a removable buttstock with elevation-adjustable cheek rest. The soft rubber ergonomic pistol grip is also removable and can be replaced with a wide variety of already available aftermarket options. The cocking bolt is reversible to suit a wide variety of shooter preferences.
A carry-handle rear sight and fixed front sight come equipped on each gun, but the included flip-up sights can be installed for use with mounted optics. The forend also features 4 Picatinny rail locations to accommodate multiple accessory mounting options.
The 12-gauge models feature an 18″ barrel with removable chokes, including an extended cylinder bore choke brake that helps tame recoil with heavy shot or slugs. Standard Full and Improved Cylinder chokes are also included, with other options available from HatsanUSA. Each gun ships with two 5-round magazines, and a 2-round magazine that can be stored in the buttstock. The gun is chambered to accept both 2 ¾” and 3″ shells and will cycle them interchangeably with no external adjustments required by the shooter.
The .410 models feature a 20″ barrel with an integrated choke suitable for both shot and slugs. Offering the same recoil-absorbing characteristics as the larger caliber models, this shotgun is extremely smooth. Also shipping with two 5-round magazines, this gun features a spare 3-round magazine stored in the buttstock. The gas piston operates in the same manner, cycling both standard and magnum loads reliably.
As with all Escort shotguns, the barrels are proof tested at the factory to ensure quality and durability. The hard chrome and/or Cerakote coatings are built to withstand the harshest conditions and look good while doing it. HatsanUSA offers a 5-year limited warranty with all Escort firearms.
SD-X Features:
  • Modern sporting style gas-operated semi-automatic shotgun
  • 12 ga or 410 cal, 3″ / 76mm chamber
  • Self-regulating gas piston cycles both 2 3/4″ and 3″ shells
  • Detachable box magazines
  • Onboard storage for spare magazine
  • 18″ or 20″ barrel for shot or slugs
  • 12-gauge model features interchangeable choke tubes (F, IC, Cyl w/ Brake)
  • Oxidation proof chrome plated steel barrel
  • All barrels are proof tested at the factory to ensure maximum durability
  • Reversible cocking handle for ambidextrous operation
  • Buffer tube mounted stock with elevation adjustable cheek rest and soft rubber buttpad
  • Soft rubber ergonomic pistol grip
  • Durable alloy upper receiver and a light-yet-durable synthetic lower receiver
  • Picatinny rail integrated into upper receiver and handguard
  • Synthetic ThermoDefend handguard with ergonomic forend grip
  • Manual safety selector switch
  • Adjustable front and rear sights
  • Detachable carry handle rear sight and front sight
  • Optional flip-up front and rear sights included
  • Mounted sling loops
  • Tough matte black or FDE Cerakote finish
  • MSRP: $619.99 – Black / $689.99 – FDE
SD-X12 Specifications:
  • 12ga gas-operated, semi-automatic shotgun
  • 18″ hard chrome plated barrel with removable chokes
  • 37.6″ overall length
  • 9.0 lbs.
  • 2x 5-rd + 1x 2-rd magazines included
  • F, IC, and CYL (brake) chokes included
SD-X410 Specifications:
  • 410cal gas-operated, semi-automatic shotgun
  • 20″ hard chrome plated fixed cylinder barrel
  • 39.6″ overall length
  • 7.8 lbs.
  • 2x 5-rd + 1x 3-rd magazines included

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46 COMMENTS

  1. Looks nice, but I just can’t get past the fact that the .410’s mag is only five shells. Why not make it eight or ten, which would be much more practical? A ten-shell mag loaded with defense loads would be perfect for a smaller bodied person.

    • Never messed with magazine fed shotguns, would 410 or 12 be reliable or is the reduce capacity a tradeoff in keeping failures to feed from happening? Other than that neat idea but need a different supreme court case to get something like this where I live.

      • I have a Saiga 12, and the magazines are very reliable. In higher capacities, their absurd length relegates them to range-toy status, but a .410 should be reasonably sized. Some report that shells start to deform after being left loaded too long.

        • Besides the bulk, the site looks European. Even if you could import the mags, it seems like 922(r) compliance would require much more creativity than US versions.

        • There are U.S. importers already, and have been for several years. You don’t see these largely because they are very, very expensive and rarely imported.

          Well, you’re not going to get rid of the bulk with 20 rd. of 12ga. That’s just a fact of life. On the other hand, the drum is much less a height issue than say, Dissident’s 20 round box mags with the monopod hanging under the gun.

        • I understand the “fact of life” part. I haven’t seen a 20rd box, but regard 8 as marginal and any larger box mags as range toys. I like the rotating-tube mags, but don’t have one (yet!).

          Even with US importers, 922(r) remains a challenge.

      • I really do enjoy having this power over your psyche, Hail. Part of me acknowledges I should take the more mature road and simply ignore you, but your little monkey dance is just so adorable. And predictable.

        • Well, since you ignored both your country’s call to service and President Trump’s urgent call to action on 1/6, you shouldn’t have much trouble ignoring me. Sleep well, ‘hero’.

    • The low capacity is a 922r mandate victim due entirely to being an imported firearm. Turkish based manufacturer, as a matter of fact. Here’s the statute, 18 USC 922r:

      https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/922

      Search: (r) and dive down the rabbit hole.

      Summarily, you cannot have a capacity of more than 5 rnd in an imported shotgun barring the firearm having been altered to posses no more than 10 foreign built parts, of which are specified in this list.

      (1) Frames, receivers, receiver castings, forgings or stampings
      (2) Barrels
      (3) Barrel extensions
      (4) Mounting blocks (trunions)
      (5) Muzzle attachments
      (6) Bolts
      (7) Bolt carriers
      (8) Operating rods

      TTAG has an article as well:

      https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/922r-compliance-and-you/

      It’s all bs, but there you go.

      • The law is as you wrote, but the subject of the article is in “assault weapon” configuration and cannot have been sold without US compliance parts added already.

        • Unless somethings changed, I believe you are mistaken. Saiga’s & the Vepr’s (although mine was specifically sold 922r compliant as a ‘added bonus feature’ because unmolested folding stock) are examples pointing to the veracity.

          Care to cite that?

      • Look at the full text of the law you cited, and also Jeremy’s article (referring to “certain specific features (detachable mag, pistol grip, folding/telescoping stock, flash suppressor, and more)”) that you linked.

        Saigas – both rifle and shotgun – were sold in “sporting” configuration (fudd buttstock and weird long trigger) for that very reason.

        • You are confused, and I see where. You’re also arguing on the side of points I made initially.

          The discussion directed at Haz is/was what it takes to have a magazine cap in excess of the 5 round limit imposed by 922r, that is where the part count enumerated above comes into play, which may or may not be applicable to the purchaser of the weapon.

          There is much legal argument on exactly who 922r applies to, whether that be the importer solely, intermediate retailers, or the end purchaser.

          As to the features, there is a feature count in play which you seemingly have missed concerning sporting purpose designations, your Saiga is not an example of good withstanding to the actual limitation of law and apparently a source of the misconstruing. Many arms, including the one in this article have “features” you stated mistakenly are banned from sporting guns. They are not wholly prohibited on sporting arms being imported, that is false. Also, no where within the definitions does it specify that changing parts is necessary in order to import either, that too is false. In the case of most folding stock Vepr’s imported for instance, they all have detachable magazines with pistol grips, and the folding stock was simply tack welded in place to legally be imported with a 5 round (shotgun) magazine limit. The subject of this article is another as you can clearly see above.

          Now, if you want to have larger magazine capacity than 5, 922r en toto may or may not apply as the legal argument goes above. Up to you if you want to test the legal waters, but should you not, the list above in my first post of compliance allowed parts counts numbered 1-8 would theoretically apply. Not before importation, which is where your misunderstanding lies. You should consult with a lawyer if you have any need for clarification.

        • I’m not “confused”, and there is no serious argument to whom “It shall be unlawful for any person to assemble from imported parts . . .” applies (emphasis added).

          922(r) itself isn’t a clear source, since it doesn’t actually spell out the criteria, but sends you on a scavenger hunt to other laws. Jeremy’s article, however, clearly summarizes them all.

          Rifles and shotguns that are “nonsporting” due to a combination of features can’t enter the US (at least not for you or me). Importers either:

          -Are US affiliates of foreign OEMs or custom shops, who import parts kits and complete / sell them with US parts;

          -Import them as pistols, which aren’t subject to that law; or

          -Import them in “sporting” / “featureless” configuration, which the buyer can either leave as such or jump through all the US-part hoops himself. Whole companies (like Tapco) exist for the sole purpose of building “compliance parts” for this market. There are, of course, different ways to make them “sporting” / “featureless”.

        • Girls, girls, you’re both pretty, and the quarterback is already going to the prom with Brittany, so play nice. 😉

          Really, though, thanks to both of you for the explanation. I didn’t realize the import restrictions were the potential issue.

        • Yep, Haz, quoting laws and facts against misinformation is such an immature, cheerleaderish thing to do!

  2. Really guys, a .410 defense shotgun. When I was 10. Ten! Me and my buddies considered .410 the minimum for squirrel hunting. Squirrel hunting! And you, grown men, seriously consider it for defense. Well, maybe men are softer where you are.

    • Only ever saw 410 in various trap/skeet competition and that judge pistol that never sold even during the pandemic panic. I am guessing 45lc would be a better (sometimes compatible) option?

    • Yeah I know .410’s dont pack much of a wallop, however that is what I’m now using for my home defense.
      Why? Living in an apartment complex I’m concerned about over penetration. And a person could, maybe, a lot of if’s with semiautomatic, use .45long colt.
      My question is , is the AR configuration that much more ergonomic then a conventional shotgunm? I think not.

    • A 12-ga is too large and powerful for my wife. A 20-ga would be perfect, but even this .410 stocked with defense (three pellets 00 buck) in capable hands would be very effective.

    • “Living in an apartment complex I’m concerned about over penetration.”

      Preach it, Marsupial One.

      Do they make those ‘shorty’ shot shells for .410? 2-pellets in something like that would be interesting…

      • Winchester’s PDX1 is 3 large disks followed by a bunch of bbs, Federal makes a defensive option with 3ish 33cal balls. They’re not bad. The problem with semiauto shoties is rimlock and the ease of incorrectly loading the mags such that they induce feeding problems. The S&W governor is easier to handle in an apartment and does the same work as one of these guys with better ammo selection…My buck and a quarter.

      • I’ve got an idea for shotgunm shale project tiles, if my test meet my standards I might have something really innovative.

  3. Gadsden Flag you are not the only one wondering why they keep pushing the .410. I had one years ago and got rid of that puny shotgun! A 28 ga. would be more practical!!!

    • Not to be a jerk but where the hell are you finding 28 ga? I can barely find 20 and 12 up until recently has only been available for stupid (even for current market) prices.

    • I last shot 410 when I was a boy scout. I remember it being…nothing. I do like the idea of an AR style shotgun but I also decided I would spend all my gun dough on my AR. Got several boxes of Wolf steel 223 for $9 each. Swore I’d never shoot steel…

      • My experiences with .223 Wolf were a lot of split cases and failures to eject when fired in my Mini-14 hope you have better luck but you get what you pay for… Keep a cleaning rod handy…

  4. The last time I looked at a magazine fed shotgun it had to have separate mags for two and three quarter shells and three inchers. They could not be mixed. Non starter for me.

    And 9 pounds for a 12 bore? Not only no, but hell no.

  5. Nice,,, Just a warning here, I ordered a shotgun same kind of application, different manufacturer, before Father’s Day,
    Still waiting….
    So unless you can physically see it. Get ready for a wait.

  6. Fairly loaded with features for a semi-auto shotgun considering the ‘crowded market’ that now exists for imported scatter guns. The 12-gauge is tempting but the .410 version makes no sense. There are now various manufacturers/importers bringing to market .410 uppers that one can slap on their existing AR-15 right now. Travis Pike (who has some writings posted here on TTAG) has a good write-up on the Charles Daly .410 upper over on GunMag Warehouse’s blog [The AR 410 — Makes Your Rifle a Scatter Gat].

    • What is needed is emmunition priced in relation to the cost of components.
      Thats one reason the .22short and the .410 shotgunm 70 years ago were popular.
      It is illogical to pay $16.89 for a box of 25 .410’s when I can buy a box of 25 12gauge for $4.56.
      Volume of sales, I know, I know.

        • They were/are a good transitional learning intro for the 6 to 7 year old crowd bagging small game. 20ga was perfect by age 8 for most.

          Same of 22lr.

    • Seems like a lot of folks pan the lowly .410 as a self defense round, as noted in several comments above. From a recent article at pewpewtactical:

      “.410-Gauge

      “Weak caliber…even with slugs. Avoid for self-defense.”

      Well, it depends on your point of reference. If you are a door kicker, or are keeping one eye peeled for hungry bears, then yes, you are better off with a 12 gauge. But keep in mind that even the lightest slug loads will put you in .357-.41 magnum territory. Nobody blows those cartridges off unless they are hating on the revolvers that shoot them. I recall the cover of a muscle magazine from a long time ago. This guy was bragging that his pecs could stop a .357 slug. Bet he got a lot of offers, but never took anybody up on it or we would have read about it in the paper. Wonder why? If you think a lever gun in .357 would make a satisfactory home defense gun, then why not this one in .410? Perhaps not, because of the magazine capacity as noted by Haz, but don’t discount it because of the caliber.

  7. .410 is a no go. as said it will cause damage but ammo pricing is silly.
    i always thought hatsan (pretty big name in pellet/ airgun stuff) was chicom. turns out they’re turkish. menh.

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