Gun Review: Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm

Dan Thurs for TTAG

By Dan Thurs

The 1911 design has been around for a very long time and has hardly changed in all those years. Why should it? Many consider John Moses Browning’s design the perfect handgun.

Springfield Armory started offering 1911 pistols in 1985. Since that time they’ve increased the calibers offered to include 9mm, .40 S&W, and, of course, the .45 ACP. Now they also offer 1911 pistols in 10mm, as in the 1911 TRP (Tactical Response Pistol) Operator models.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

Lack of available ammunition is the biggest complaint I hear from people when it comes to 10mm. While that may have been true in the past, that’s changed.

At the time of this article, we have more than 20 different loads of 10mm ammunition ranging from 60gr up to 220gr bullets, with muzzle velocities from subsonic all the way up to 2400fps.

The cost of these rounds is comparable to 9mm defensive rounds and they’re available from most major manufacturers. Most are around $35 per box of 20.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

The only real shortcoming at this point may be FMJ ammo choices for your days at the range where you just want to practice. A few manufacturers offer range loads for about $25 per box of 50. I’m sure this will improve as the caliber becomes more popular.

Loading your own is always an option, too. In this case, you can load rounds close to your defensive rounds in regards to performance. I’ve been able to load for about 35 cents per round not including the cost of brass.

Features

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

After spending a little time with the 1911 TRP at the range, I can say I’m rather impressed. I’m a big 9mm guy in regards to every day carry. The 10mm seems to have a bit of snap to the recoil, a bit like a .40. However, once you get used to it, which only takes a few rounds, it’s very controllable.

I’m also a big caliber guy, meaning I love anything big. While the the TRP Operator is fairly hefty at 40oz, it’s not going to tire you out while shooting it. You won’t have to take up weight lifting to be effective with the pistol.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

The 1911 TRP features a Picatinny rail, forged steel frame and slides, a stainless steel match grade barrel, and fully supported feed ramps.

There’s just the right amount of weight here to control recoil without weighing you down too much. In this video you can see how it performed with different shooters.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

The Springfield 1911 TRP 10mm Operator has the short, crisp single action trigger (Springfield’s Gen2 Speed Trigger) pull that’s characteristic of the John Moses Browning platform. This model had a 5 pound pull (Springfield ships the gun with a pull weight between 4.5 and 5 lbs.) and a mere 1/32” travel to make it go bang. Personally, I prefer a pull weight more in the 3 to 4 pound range in a 1911, but that’s me.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

The TRP 10mm Operator ships with attractive VZ G10 grips. They may look uncomfortably aggressive, but aren’t at all. Combined with Springfield’s Octo-Grip checkering on the mainspring housing and front strap, your hand will stay comfortably in place without the pistol shredding your palm under fire.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

Also standard is an ambidextrous safety and drift-adjustable low profile SA tactical rack rear 3-dot tritium night sights.

Ergonomics

1911 pistols are naturally comfortable to carry and shoot. The only ergonomic problem I encountered was reaching slide stop and magazine release buttons. I have average size hands, but had to take the pistol off target and adjust my grip to get to them. They’re slightly too far to press them with a standard shooting grip.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

I let a few other shooters try the gun. While, to a person they remarked on how much fun the gun is to shoot, they experienced the same problem. Shooters with size large hands may not have that problem, but as a competition shooter, I notice things like this.

Range Testing

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

The Springfield TRP 10mm Operator was tested under controlled conditions. The firearm was clamped into a vise to remove human error and each round was passed through a chronograph, with strings of 3 to 5 rounds each.

Group patterns as well as maximum size were logged. Below are a few examples of these results.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

 

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

Each target was at 25 yards. The Springfield Armory 1911 TRP produced impressive average patterns of about 1.5”. A few, like Federal HST was significantly better than that. This is one accurate pistol.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

The only hiccup I experienced was when one of the really hot rounds ripped the case in half leaving one half in the chamber. I can’t really blame this on the gun.

Even the RIP ammo I tested cycled with no issues. I’ve had people tell me RIP ammo hates 1911s (or vice versa), but I didn’t see any issues with it in the TRP.

Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

In the end, the Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator is a feature-packed, very well-built, accurate pistol. While it’s on the heavy side for everyday carry, it would excel as a home defense or hunting and general outdoors pistol.

Specifications: Springfield Armory 1911 TRP 10mm Operator

Caliber: 10mm (also available in 9mm, .40 S&W, .45 ACP)
Grips: Thin-Line G10
Front Sight: Fiber Optic Front
Barrel Length: 5”
Material: Forged Steel
Capacity: 8+1
Rear Sight: Tactical Rack Rear
Twist: 1:16
Finish: Black-T® Finish
Overall Length: 8.6″
Weight: 40oz
MSRP: $1,790 (about $1450 retail)

Ratings (out of five stars):

Style and Appearance * * * * *
The 1911 TRP 10mm Operator is one good-looking pistol. The standard “dirty olive” G10 grips may look aggressive, but they’re attractive and work well. The 1911 is an inherently attractive design and Springfield didn’t do anything to diminish that here.

Customization * * *
The 1911 platform has hundreds of options available. With the TRP 10mm Operator’s Picatinny rail, mounting flashlights and laser sights is a snap. Aftermarket barrels seem to be a bit of a challenge. I wasn’t able to locate a threaded barrel…something that should be available for an “operator” pistol.

Reliability * * * * *
After sending several hundred rounds through this gun I have very few issues to report. Actually, only one.

Accuracy * * * * *
Turning out 1.5″ groups at 25 yard is excellent. For a handgun that isn’t likely to see a lot of use outside that range, this pistol is far more limited by its shooters’ ability than the accuracy that’s built in.

Overall * * * * 1/2
Accuracy, reliability, and the timeless good looks of a 1911 are top notch. The only factors denying a full five stars are the ergonomic issue and the fact that this “operator” pistol doesn’t seem to be available with a threaded barrel. But neither of those is a reason to not take a good look at the TRP 10mm Operator.

 

All photos courtesy the author. 

comments

  1. avatar jwm says:

    10mm ammo may be widely available on line. But hose of us that live in the great state of California(do I really need a sarcasm tag?) can’t order on line and have it delivered to our door like we did in the past.

    And I’m not ready to forgive Springfield just as yet.

    So I bought a Ruger .357. It will do anything a 10mm will.

    1. avatar Anymouse says:

      This wouldn’t be on CA’s “safe” pistol list anyway. I haven’t forgiven SA or felt they’re repentant either. With friends like that, who needs enemies.

    2. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

      If you compare full power ammo, the 10mm round is almost a .357, not almost a .41 like it’s fan-boys like to claim. It makes sense in a semi-auto, but not in a revolver.

      1. avatar jwm says:

        Took my new Ruger to the range for the first time Saturday. I’m happy with it.

        1. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

          Excellent.

      2. avatar George WashingtonGl says:

        Wrong…. just wrong…. learn reading comprehension…. please…
        10mm is MORE POWERFUL THAN .357…… FOOL

  2. avatar I Haz A Question says:

    Agreed. Due to the Keystone Kops in Sacramento passing gun control bills like they’re the answer to cancer, we can’t really have anything here. For now.

    At some point, if (1) I permanently move out of CA after living here my entire life or (2) the pendulum swings and these laws/regs get knocked down, I’ll want a quality 10mm 1911. Let’s get rid of the absurd “unsafe gun roster”, repeal the BGC/FFL requirement for ammo, and fast track Hawaii v. Young so we can finally have open carry again. Even if some of you dislike open carry (and the Left will not like it at all), it will at least restore our ability to carry in suburban & rural areas and force the discussion of concealed carry so that the Lefties won’t have to look at our iron strapped to our hips.

    1. avatar Mark N. says:

      Restoring open carry is only half the battle, and the easy part at that. We are still left with the GFSZA that precludes the possession of firearms within 1000″ of a school campus–ANY school campus–without a CCW. The maps I’ve seen plotting the school zones in major metro areas show that you can’t even cross town without entering one. And it is no different in my much smaller burg up north; I can’t leave my house much less my neighborhood without traveling through one or more zones, nor can you drive down I-5 without passing through. I rather suspect that it will be a cold day in Hell before a court overturns the federal law, much less the independent California law.

      1. avatar The Crimson Pirate says:

        The Federal GFSZA exempts people with a license/permit from the state the school is located in. It also only covers K-12 schools.

        Otherwise none of us anywhere would be able to carry anywhere. If the CA residents can overturn enough that they can get licenses/permits then they will be OK in regards to schools.

    2. avatar chuckers says:

      Why did you all vote those frickin democrats in power in the first place. I would have said office but to a dem polititian winning means power over it’s commoners.

      1. avatar I Haz A Question says:

        And by “you”, you mean everyone else besides those of us who consistently vote for conservative Republicans, right?

      2. avatar Eric Swalwell says:

        Hey! I resemble that remark my friend!

  3. avatar Billb says:

    It seems I read a while back that this model is actually beefier than the regular 1911. Can’t remember where I saw it or the details though. Or maybe this isn’t the model I’m thinking about.

    1. avatar Anymouse says:

      It has a rail on the dust cover, so it’s going to be more muzzle heavy. They might have a heavier recoil spring for the 10mm too.

  4. avatar PTM says:

    “I’m sure this will improve as the caliber becomes more popular.”

    The round was introduced in 1983…it isn’t becoming more popular anytime soon. It is what it is. I tell people who get the itch for 10mm to go with a Glock 20. Great handgun. Easy to use with 10mm. Great capacity.

    As for SA….they lost me with their shenanigans in Illinois.

    1. avatar Squiggy81 says:

      Added bonus with the G20 is that it works flawlessly with 40 cal. The 1911 might also, but I know it to be true about the G20 because I’ve done it. I’m sure the 1911 has a significant edge in the accuracy department, though. G20 is a solid pistol, but not the most accurate.

      1. avatar Billb says:

        Interesting. That makes me want to get a few .40 rounds and see what happens in my 1006. Don’t these rounds headspace on the case mouth? If so it seems like the 40 would be short in the 10mm chamber and would either seat too deep to fire or be held in place only by the extractor. Since I haven’t played around with this idea maybe someone can clarify this?

        1. avatar Squiggy81 says:

          The round is held in place by the extractor. Jeremy from TTAG has a good article on here. Just google “40 cal in Glock 20” and it comes right up. A Smith should operate just the same, I would assume. Jeremy cautions not to do it, but that’s just a CYA thing.

        2. avatar Billb says:

          That’s what I was thinking. I’d at least like to see if it mechanically works even if not firing it. I guess there’s also the chance that, with a stout extractor/spring the round could just be shoved into the chamber too deep for the firing pin to get at it. I’ll have to borrow a round or two since I don’t have any .40.

    2. avatar Rad Man says:

      Beat me to it.

    3. avatar Anymouse says:

      There seems to be a 10mm renaissance with more companies introducing models in the last couple years, mainly in 1911 frames. It certainly isn’t going to replace 9mm and .45. Time will tell if it drops back to just Glock again in the future or maintains a steady niche.

    4. avatar Bruce says:

      Yet, I see more and more 10 mm in stores, including almost decent priced FMJ for target ammo. Or maybe it is just in W MT, where 10 mm has become the favorite for bear ammunition. I bought a G20 two years ago, and struggled to find ammo. But starting a year ago, it started to be reasonably plentiful. A year and a half ago, there was almost none at the Cabelas 2 miles north in AZ. A year later there was a half dozen different options, including a bunch of boxes of the stuff I use for target shooting. Weirdly, there were several different types of bear ammo available two. I expect it in W MT, where black bear are plentiful, and brown bear are often a possibility. But in PHX, the nearest brown bear outside a zoo is probably almost 1,000 miles away.

      That said, I still typically shoot .40 for target practice, and shoot my G20 with it better than I shoot 9 mm with my G17. But I still shoot 10 mm a fair bit.

      1. avatar Bruce says:

        Let me add that one reason that I would be reluctant to switch from a G20 to this 1911 for bear defense, is round count. There are just too many stories of people having to put 10 or more rounds into a charging brown bear to stop it. That is also why I prefer a semiautomatic over a large caliber revolver.

        Just a reminder though – it took 7-8 rounds of 10 mm for Officer Owen Wilson to stop almost 300 lb “Big Mike” Brown.

    5. avatar George WashingtonGl says:

      No…. it’s increasing in popularity….. get a brain and stop trying to condemn something you obviously know nothing about…..js

  5. avatar Ron says:

    Maybe if SA actually tried to correct their image by donating vast sums of their enormous wealth to pro 2A candidates and causes, people would be willing to forgive them and move on. But they hold firm in their ignorance.

    1. avatar Eric Swalwell says:

      Springfield Armory is an example of what companies can be when big business interests work with those who seek to protect our children and families…. like me. Springfield Armory are true American patriots and I look forward to working with them to make this country more saferer. And when I put them out of business (after they help me knock off the other manufacturers first) I might just cry a little…. maybe….. okay, not really.

  6. avatar Billb says:

    I’ve been shooting 10mm in a Smith 1006 for many years. Ammo is a lot easier to find now than it was years ago and FMJ I just saw today that averaged less than $16 for 50rd box bought in 1,000 round quantity. Same ammo is at my local gun store for $18.95 a box. This is S&B commercial brass cased 180gr fmj. It is a great range/plinking round. I also have some PPU but I’d like to chronograph it to see if it’s weak. I’ve read that it goes both ways, too hot or too soft.

  7. avatar Ferg in Tahoe says:

    Not a fan of SA. I’ll stick with my Kimber Grand Raptor in .45. I use Chip’s 10 rounders and that sort of takes away from that empty feeling of standard 7/8 round mags. And yeah, Gavin Nuisance’s bs laws on ammo purchase in Cal really blows.

    1. avatar George WashingtonGl says:

      Oh… you’ll stick to your jam-o-matic?…… gotcha

  8. avatar Cames Jampbell says:

    Whatever I’ll stick with my PPQ w/ AMT backup.

  9. avatar Jeff the Griz says:

    Thank you for the review. A 10mm 1911 is on my “eventually” list, but not a Springfield.

    1. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

      Agreed.

    2. avatar tsbhoa.p.jr says:

      that right there. the little emp is neat too, but i ain’t doin’ it.
      i wrote to ithaca, no 10mm planned. so, i wait. dan wesson looks great but maybe double stack would be better. cz’s 97 could maybe happen- i know tanfoglio does it in ten (and .41) but i’ll wait. i’d probably jump on a grand power or lion heart.

      1. avatar Jeff the Griz says:

        The Witness Hunter in 10mm is one sweet rig. That futuristic scope rail for it is cool too

    3. avatar George WashingtonGl says:

      Why not a Springfield? Get off the high horse…. unless you’re directly affected by what they did, then stop worrying…. they are still a US manufacturer of firearms….. and they sell to civilians….
      So unless it’s your business, then stay out of theirs and stop being a FUDD

  10. avatar Michael in AK says:

    heck no on Springfield and no thanks on a 1911 in 10MM

  11. avatar Biff says:

    You can buy Blazer Brass Cased online for .30 per round at Targetsportsusa. It list a velocity of 1200 FPS too, so not .40 loaded into a 10mm case.

  12. avatar Hannibal says:

    Are those groupings actually good for a pistol in a vice (as opposed to held)?

    1. avatar PTM says:

      No way, they really stink.

    2. avatar Dude says:

      The FBI asked for 1.5″ groups from a Ransom Rest at 25 yards for the HRT 1911 contract. Wilson Combat said it couldn’t be done with the specified ammo. Springfield Armory got the contract.

      1. avatar PTM says:

        Those are not 1.5″ groups in the photos.

        1. avatar Dude says:

          Yeah, the text says he got 1.5″ average, but I’m not sure how he measured that.

        2. avatar Mr. Tactical says:

          I found the mean center of the grouping and measured out from there finding ~0.75″ out. The issue is the twist rate of the barrel which is 1:16, the Glock 10mm handguns are 1:9.84 which has a higher rate of spin creating a more ballistically stable round.

          I did get a G29 sent in last week and will be running tests on that shortly. My calculations suggest the Glock will have better ballistic stability, but only benchmarking that will prove it. I’ll be getting on that testing and article as soon as I finish the G44 article

        3. avatar Dude says:

          Thanks for the reply.

        4. avatar George WashingtonGl says:

          It’ll be ok…. you FREAK!

  13. avatar oldguy says:

    I have a Sig P220 in 10 mm that I really enjoy shooting. I bought it to carry for wilderness hiking and it feels heavy after long trails (and short trails – its’ just heavy). I believe it would be an effective round for wilderness hiking defense.

    I’ve shot a friends Colt Delta and Springfield XDM in 10 mm that I didn’t enjoy as much.

  14. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

    Ammo warehouse has armscore for 352 for a 1,200 round case. That’s $14.67 per 50

  15. avatar Carlwinslo says:

    Smurf you Springfield!

    1. avatar George WashingtonGl says:

      What are you 10 years old? Grow the fk up already….

  16. avatar Gadsden Flag says:

    I’ve always said that 1911s should be .45 ACP. I would at least try one in 10mm. The shame of owning a 1911 in 9mm would prevent me showing my face among my friends.

    1. avatar BusyBeef says:

      That’s ok. Those of us shooting 9mm 1911s in USPSA Single Stack and absolutely crushing the Fudds won’t really mind.

  17. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

    Will it help you find your ex-girlfriend who’s living in LA with your ex-best friend Ray? Or do they just throw out that name to impress the mall ninjas?

    1. avatar Gadsden Flag says:

      Huh? Gov, perhaps I’m just obtuse, but don’t get the point of your post.

      1. avatar Defens says:

        Oblique reference to old Jim Croce song.

      2. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

        I find that when you encounter a cultural reference you don’t understand it’s best to ignore it and go on with your life. When I was young and stupid I tried to educate myself on such things. I even went so far as to attempt reading The Catcher in the Rye. Got 3/4 through it before I broke down and threw it in the trash when he didn’t kill the pimp. What a pointless waste of time. Nothing happened. The truth is that beatnik eggheads just love word salad. The story is irrelevant. All that matters is how you put the words together and they’ll read into it whatever they want. Which is fine because it’s art, even if it is lame art. And so it is with ironic humor. If you can find some sort of satisfaction or profound meaning in my words then great. But don’t think I’m telling you to shoot the president because THAT is the one thing I’m NOT trying to tell you.

        1. avatar George WashingtonGl says:

          Gd you’re a MORON…..Gov. moron, please spare us of your stupidity….

      3. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

        They should have painted it green and called it The Zombie Killer. It would have been more culturally up to date and it would have been less pretentious.

        1. avatar Dude says:

          Springfield Armory Operator models is their way of saying 1911 with a light rail.

        2. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

          An $800 light rail.

        3. avatar George WashingtonGl says:

          Pot calling the kettle black???….. you’re one annoying SOB

    2. avatar tsbhoa.p.jr says:

      oy. i hope that was your last dime.

  18. avatar Kendahl says:

    I wish somebody (Sig would be a logical candidate) would make a 5″ steel 1911 in 9 mm and play the same game with the magazine that Sig did with the P365 to increase capacity yet not have a fat grip. The gun would shoot 115 grain cartridges like they were .22s.

  19. avatar D.J.U. says:

    Well at 35 cents per hand load your not being very thrifty. Using Berries double struck hollow points, buying them in bulk quanities with free shipping, or even many copper jacketed 180 grain projectiles purchased in bulk on clearance or sale i can load at 20 cents per load or less not counting the initial purchace of brass. 10mm just doesn’t use that much more powder than a 40 S&W. And good primers purchased in bulk are just at 3 cents or 4 cents each. 10 to 12 cents for the projectile and the rest in powder. Even at 15 to 18 cents for projectiles each stll cheaper than 35 cent cartridges and still top grade target or self defense.

  20. avatar Defens says:

    Had a Glock 20 that I short in IPSC for a couple of years, but just couldn’t hang onto that fat grip very well. I bought the long slide 10mm TRP a couple years ago and love it. More accurate than several of my other 1911s, and one of my favorites as a field gun. I often pack it in an Alaska chest rig while hiking or foraging around in the woods.

    My only regret was in buying mine before they came out with the optics-ready version with the removable plate.

  21. avatar Nick says:

    I hate people continuously exaggerating the cost of 10mm. 10mm FMJ is currently sitting at 27 cents per round on Ammoseek. Cost is no longer a prohibitive factor.

  22. avatar StuckInIllinois says:

    Beating a dead horse, but I really wish SA would fall on its sword and make right the wrongs they committed here in Illinoisistan. Till then, nope. And a Ronin Commander would sure be on my shopping list.

    1. avatar Boogaloo says:

      If they fell on their sword they would be dead….

      Wrong metaphor.

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