In Search of the Perfect Holster

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Recently, TTAG asked their Armed Intelligentsia, “How Do You Carry Your Gun?” As I read Robert’s post – and the responses from the AI – I began running through my…

Gear Review: GO-Magnets Gun Mounting Magnets

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There must be something to this internet advertising thing. I saw an ad on Facebook for gun magnets and actually clicked on their page to learn more about them. And…

Book Review: Blue Book of Antique American Firearms & Values

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Head to any gun show and you’ll see plenty well-worn copies of the Blue Book of Gun Values. While it gets updated every year (2017 is BBGV’s 38th year), people…

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Smith & Wesson Bolt Action Rifles, a Blast From the Past

For most of its history, Smith & Wesson had been known for producing high quality revolvers. When the polymer pistol craze began, S&W jumped on the bandwagon as well and,…

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Obscure Object of Desire: AA-12 Atchisson Assault Shotgun

In a comment under my recent article about the USAS-12 automatic shotgun, a reader mentioned the Atchisson Assault Shotgun. He wanted to know if TTAG could fill him in on…

Obscure Object of Desire: USAS-12 Automatic Shotgun

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On January 9, 1989, John Trevor, Jr. submitted a patent application for a new shotgun. The application simply called it a “high volume automatic and semi-automatic firearm.” To expound on…

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NRA Museums: How to Care for Your Collectible Firearm

Looking back at 30 years with the National Rifle Association and being responsible for a collection of thousands of historic firearms can give one a different perspective when it comes…

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Confederate Revolvers: Thomas W. Cofer

Guns made by Portsmouth, Virginia-based Thomas W. Cofer are some of the rarest examples of Confederate revolvers. Based on the Whitney Navy, estimates put total production numbers somewhere between 86…

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Confederate Revolvers: J. H. Dance & Brothers

Revolvers made by Dance are some of the most distinctive guns to come out of the south. While they are copied from the Colt Dragoon, they differ in a very…

Confederate Revolvers: Spiller and Burr

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The Spiller and Burr factory was originally established in Richmond, Virginia, as the brainchild of wealthy businessmen Edward Spiller and David Burr, along with firearms expert James Burton. Burr was…

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Confederate Revolvers: Griswold and Gunnison

Before the Civil War, Samuel Griswold was a successful businessman, having found a good living making cotton gins. Business was so good that he purchased 4,000 acres outside of Macon,…

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Building a Better Bullet

  Just as we continue to try to perfect projectiles in the 21st century, the same was true back in the 19th century. Buck-and-ball fired from a shotgun allowed the…