[VIDEO] Blaser’s New R8 Ultimate Rifle With Tool-less Adjustable Stock at the Dallas Safari Club

Blaser R8 Ultimate rifle

Frances Arnold for TTAG

There’s a reason I have reviewed two Blaser R8 rifles. To quote Craig Boddington:

“Just spend some time with it! Amazing system…that’s what I’ve hunted with the most since 2010, wound up buying one for me and a short-stocked R8 for Donna. The amazing thing is you can switch barrels and scopes back and forth and the darned thing works. Must admire German engineering!”

 

Blaser has taken the next step in the world of modular system rifles that are dependable, easy to use and incredibly accurate by introducing the new R8 Ultimate with a variety of modular stock options. Listen as Kevin Wistner of Blaser USA describes the ‘new’ format providing the shooter/hunter with a fully-adjustable (no-tools-required!) Blaser R8.

 

[Video and photos courtesy Frances Arnold.]

comments

  1. avatar Boogaloo says:

    Looks great!!

  2. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

    Having been able to handle and shoot a couple of these rifles, it is really fun to shoot. Not only is it unique, the two I shot were extremely accurate.

  3. avatar Vlad Tepes says:

    Besides its junk plastic stock the fact that it is a pistol grip stock is a great disadvantage not an advantage. Militaries teach their soldiers to carry pistol grip stocked assault rifles muzzle down and stock flat against the shoulder as its the only way to try and snap the gun to the shoulder for a quick shot. The pistol grip stock was originally invented to help control full automatic fire and the bolt gun is hardly a rapid fire weapon. The pistol grip stock on a bolt gun is about as useless as tits on a boar and has more drawbacks than advantages.

    1. avatar GS650G says:

      Plenty of buyers and shooters disagree with you.
      That’s because they have experience with the product instead of talking about it.

      1. avatar Vlad Tepes says:

        And you just proved you do not have any experience with either.

        try again Jethro

        1. avatar Casey says:

          I mean, it’s a product in demand that’s making money with good reviews.

          Could literally everyone be wrong EXCEPT you? Yeah, I suppose.

          But isn’t it weird just how often that happens?

        2. avatar Vlad Tepes' ashamed father says:

          And you have proven repeatedly that outside of your worthless mothers basement you have no experience with anything.

      2. avatar strych9 says:

        GS:

        You have to admit that his OP is pretty impressive. It’s hard to be 100% wrong about literally everything but… somehow he manages.

    2. avatar Boogaloo says:

      This guy is a constant source of entertainment. Keep it up Vlad.

    3. avatar Boogaloo says:

      Ah, let’s take a look at Vlad’s latest pronouncement. Apparently the man has never heard of high port and how it is done and why.

      Carry on my wayward friend.

    4. avatar Stuck in NJ says:

      Vlad — Putin, is that you?
      First of all, this is a thumbhole stock, not a pistol grip stock. Don’t you even know the difference?
      Second, you’re displaying your vast ignorance of the advantages of pistol-grip stocks on bolt-action rifles and single-shot (break-action) rifles, such as:
      1) One of the biggest advantages is that having the palm of your firing hand holding the stock makes the gun recoil into your hand, so your palm absorbs some of the recoil, rather than having 100% of the recoil transmitted through your shoulder. That’s a big advantage with most centerfire calibers bigger than .223.
      2) Another advantage is it’s more controllable, easier to aim precisely.
      3) Another advantage is it’s more ergonomic, more comfortable, fits the human hand better, especially thumbhole stocks. Most thumbhole stocks are designed to fit like a glove for right-handed people (you can also find left-handed models). Why should we be forced stick with old firearms designs from the 16th century, when today’s polymers (and also machined wood) give us the ability to have more comfortable grips on our guns? Pick up a bolt-action rifle with a well-made, well-fitting thumbhole stock (such as Boyd’s wood stocks), and you might never go back to the old straight stock again!

      Sure, there are disadvantages to a pistol grip, but they’re not the one you made up about “carrying rifles with the muzzle down.”
      1) Contrary to the belief of gun-haters like you who call rifles with pistol grips “assault weapons”, a pistol grip makes it harder to shoot from the hip. However, nobody in their right mind shoots from the hip with a rifle unless they’re a Hollyweird action-movie star or are just playing Range Rambo.
      2) On a bolt-action or break-action, IMHO, a pistol grip or thumbhole stock slows you down slightly on follow-up shots, because it takes a half-second longer to open your grip before moving your hand to cycle the bolt. This isn’t much of a problem unless you’re hunting dangerous game, because if you’re using a bolt-action or break-action, you’re not expecting rapid follow-up shots.
      3) Pistol grip rifles (and thumbhole rifles) require a different shape carrying case. No biggie, just a one-time small-dollar purchase.
      4) Pistol grip rifles take up more room in a gun safe. So buy a second gun safe!
      5) Thumbhole stocks for bolt-action rifles are usually a little heavier than a straight stock.
      6) And finally, thumbhole and pistol-grip stocks look “scary” to ignorant people who lack knowledge of guns, such as Vlad!

  4. avatar JP says:

    I have used my Blaser Professional Success (BPS) stock all over the planet, including on dangerous game. It has performed great, including follow up shots. The Blaser action cycles more quickly than a standard bolt action.

    The thumbhole stock is very comfortable to shoot and is easier to shoot more precisely.

    I use the same Pelican carrying case with BPS as other rifles; simply change out the foam inserts.

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