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In a landmark decision on Friday, the Supreme Court overturned the 40-year-old Chevron v. National Resources Defense Council ruling, which had granted federal agencies broad regulatory authority. This move upends the agencies’ ability to issue regulations unless Congress has explicitly authorized them to do so. The decision represents a substantial victory for conservatives, who have long sought to limit the power of unelected bureaucrats in crafting regulations that curtail or limit the freedoms of Americans.

The court’s ruling split along ideological lines, with Chief Justice John Roberts writing for the conservative majority. Justices Elena Kagan, Sonia Sotomayor and Ketanji Brown Jackson dissented, with Kagan reading parts of her dissent from the bench, CBS News reported.

“Chevron is overruled. Courts must exercise their independent judgment in deciding whether an agency has acted within its statutory authority,” Roberts wrote, emphasizing that the previous decision required judges to disregard their statutory duties.

The original Chevron doctrine mandated that courts defer to an agency’s interpretation of laws passed by Congress if it was reasonable. Critics argued this gave too much power to federal agencies, allowing them to shape policies significantly impacting American life, such as when the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (still commonly referred to as the ATF) passes restrictions on the types of firearms citizens can own. The Supreme Court’s decision to reverse Chevron marks a shift toward increased judicial oversight of agency actions.

What It Means for Americans

For the average American, this ruling signals a shift in how federal regulations will be crafted and implemented. Federal agencies like the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the ATF and others will now face stricter scrutiny when issuing new regulations. This change could slow the implementation of new rules and shift more responsibility back to Congress to clearly define regulatory parameters.

Supporters of the decision argue that it restores proper checks and balances, ensuring that elected representatives in Congress, not unelected agency officials, have the final say on significant policy decisions. Critics, however, worry that it could lead to regulatory gridlock, with agencies less able to swiftly address emerging issues like climate change, healthcare needs and financial regulation.

A Win for Gun Owners

The Supreme Court’s decision is particularly noteworthy for gun owners, as it curtails the regulatory authority of the ATF. The ruling effectively limits the ATF’s ability to interpret and enforce regulations without explicit congressional authorization, even when pushed by a presidential administration hostile to the Second Amendment.

Gun rights advocates have long criticized the ATF for overstepping its regulatory boundaries, particularly regarding firearm modifications and accessories. For example, the ATF’s attempt to ban bump stocks was recently struck down in a separate Supreme Court ruling. With the Chevron doctrine overturned, such regulatory actions by the ATF will now face more stringent judicial review.

This legal shift is definitely a positive development for gun owners, who believe the ATF should be abolished since it has historically imposed burdensome regulations that infringe on Second Amendment rights. While the ruling far from abolishes agencies that bureaucratically seek to create laws, it should certainly limit them, putting the lawmaking process back in the hands of Congress, where it rightfully belongs.

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54 COMMENTS

    • Safe, I had the same thought. Bruen was, and is, great for us as the POTG, but this thing is going to be very far reaching.

    • I’m not convinced it’s as big a deal as you think. Chevron deference was held not to apply in the criminal context in Gun Owners of America v. Garland. If you notice, it doesn’t come up at all in the Cargill decision.

      • Jim, I understand your point. However, from what I understand bureaucracies are already scrambling. That’s amusing if nothing else.

        • You’re right about that. Just imagine – elected representatives actually having to do what we pay them for: debate, write, and enact legislation rather than leaving the heavy lifting to unelected, unaccountable appointees.

          • “Just imagine – elected representatives actually having to do what we pay them for…rather than leaving the heavy lifting to unelected, unaccountable appointees.”
            The ruling is merely symbolic. Congress can legislate outside boundaries, and deliberately legislate regulatory interpretation to “the experts” within the Executive Branch.

            When Congress wants to avoid responsibility, Congress will always find a way to claim to the voters that Congress is not responsible for the results of legislation.

            • They can claim all they want, but after this ruling only indoctrinated democrats will believe them. As has always been the case.

          • Maybe we can return the job of coining money back to Congress where it rightfully belongs.

            The Federal Reserve should not decide how much money to print, or what the interest on that money should be.

            That’s power rests solely with Congress.

            • “The Federal Reserve should not decide how much money to print, or what the interest on that money should be.

              That’s power rests solely with Congress.”

              Recommend reading “The Creature from Jekyll Island” for understanding how “The Fed” came to be. Once “The Fed” was created by Congress, there has been little interest in revisiting the decision.

      • great… now disarm anything with agency, bureau, or department in their title, then fire 90 percent of their payroll.

    • SCOTUS has really been bitch slapping the ATF and the gun-grabbers lately! Is ATF coming up with any more rules right now? Rules,rules,rules, KMA. ABOLISH ATF/RESCIND NFA!

  1. My question is will the agencies fall in line now, or just continue with business as usual igoring the supreme court.

    Like hopefully there’s a control apparatus somewhere thatll turn to shut these things diwn at the starting gate.

    • Bureaucracy is self-perpetuating and expanding. It will always push the boundaries outward. As Vinny noted below, the lawyers will get rich as they take years attempting to prune the jungle back. And the closer they get to “lean government” the closer we will be to a reversal of the pendulum, and another “Chevron” type decision will swing it back the other way.

      • Bureaucracy tends to block vote…

        On the county level I have seen situations resembling a “govt majority”.

        Prune that back of you can, and at your own risk.

    • “Like hopefully there’s a control apparatus somewhere thatll turn to shut these things diwn at the starting gate.”

      There is such a mechanism…the same one that prevents legislatures and lower federal from failing to implement the processes proclaimed in “Bruen”.

      “Mr. Marshall has made his decision. Now let him enforce it!”

  2. Ultimately, this moves the goal-line from “agencies” and “unelected bureaucrats” can make “rules” that are hard to overturn to “judicial activists” can make “rules” that are hard to overturn.

    Of course, we already have judicial activism, so…

  3. One day and I pray I am around Gun Control will be Abolished like its sidekick Slavery was Abolished. Insanity is having the 1968 Gun Control Act on the books when History Confirms Gun Control in any shape, matter or form is Rooted in Racism and Genocide.

  4. Today’s post debate democRat Party buzzword? Democracy. To show you are a genuine useful idiot for the Rat Party apparently you have to be an impromptu valley girl and sing the word while speaking so it sounds like dee mock raa ceee. Or go nuts like the jacked up aoc: DEE MOCK RAA CEEE.

    TRUMP 2024.

    • Oh, I’d *love* to flip you around like a flapjack and make you squeal with delight, if you keep talking like that… 😉

      • Buckwheat flapjack withblackstrap molases wrapped around a halepeno cheddar brat …. mmm, mmm, good

        • mmm, mmm, good is Campbell’s trademark, and it definitely is bullshit.
          Now all three of you STFU before I upchuck

  5. Because of Chevron, the EPA emission “laws” or should I say regulations made it ILLEGAL to install a 1992 model year engine in your 1993 vehicle OR just tune your the software on your modern car for better performance. Which is CRAZY! This decision will affect all three letter agencies.

    • hopefully the AMA and the Surgeon General will leave ARs alone and go after the nearly 100% lethal abortion drugs then – you know… something actually under their purvue.

  6. Thank you to President Trump. Who appointed conservatives to the courts. And Thank you to the Libertarians liberals and the left. Who can’t answer the question.

    What is a woman???

    They only care about skin color. That is why they supported the first black woman for the SC. And that black female judge can’t answer that question.

    But she can say you have no civil rights.

  7. Trump 2024!

    Actually, Trump will be no more effective than in his first term; ‘the swamp’ and entrenched bureaucracy remain opposed to allowing Trump to change much of anything. Trump ignored the Jesse Ventura one-term governorship experience, and is ignoring it again. Worst of all, Republicrats have no one on the bench who can bring out voters like Trump.

    • The Republicans Democrats and the Libertarians are all the same.

      They are for America last.

      Only Trump has put America first. So yes the american future is in doubt. Buy more ammo and take training classes.

      Having a small solar generator and a way to make clean drinking water, is also a good idea.

      If you have a source of clean drinking water and guns. You will be just fine.

      Nati.onal Divo.rce.

    • The democrats and republicans and the libertarians are all the same.

      They put ame.rica la.st.

      Only Donald Trump puts ameri.ca fir.st. The others are intern.ation.alists. And they support op.en bord.ers.

      And america’s future is in doubt after Trump leaves office. I suggest everybody buy more ammo. And take a training class.

      Also find a way to produce your own drinking water and get a small solar generator. Those are two other very good ways to be independent from the government.

    • “Actually, Trump will be no more effective than in his first term;…”

      I sure hope so, he got 3 SCotUS pics confirmed, and they have performed admirably getting us ‘Bruen’, ‘Loper-Bright’, and a few other good rulings.

      Imagine what Trump can do if Kagan and the ‘Wise Latina’ were to drop dead while Trump is in power!

      An 8-1 SCotUS our way sounds good to me… 😉

      • “An 8-1 SCotUS our way sounds good to me…”

        There’s that. However with both legislative houses controlled by Dims, Trump might be out of office by time replacement Justices are confirmed, and likely not “Conservatives”.

        Note: there are only two reliable conservatives on the bench: Alito and Thomas.

  8. Trump 2024!!!

    No you won’t get le.gal.ized drug.s. But you will have le.gal bu.tt se.x. And in some areas of the country. you will be able to have b.utt se.x in front of children.

    In fact the libertar.ians libe.rals and the Left, are very concerned about making this se.x act protected.

    But they are not concerned about firearms education and training books in the libraries. And having those books removed.

    From the athe.ists Reason Magazine.

    https://reason.com/2024/04/26/alabama-bill-would-criminalize-librarians-who-allow-material-harmful-to-minors/

  9. Of all of the recent and future cases before the SCOTUS this one case is probably the most important and the most impactful of them all. This decision will put many of the ATF’s BS moves to the ash heap! They should and will have to go to the Congress to screw over Americans.
    This case will allow courts to rule that many of the rulings in many many departments that these ‘regulations’ are unconstitutional and be negated!! Yea for us!

  10. BREAKING SCOTUS NEWS: DOJ SUFFERS TERRIBLE DEFEAT.

    The Department of Justice lost big time in the Supreme Court involving indictment of President Trump and January 6 defendants. Mark Smith Four Boxes Diner analyzes.

  11. he Chevron Doctrine is dead (1984-2024). Washington Gun Law President, William Kirk, discusses the huge ruling from SCOTUS which strikes down the Chevron Doctrine and thus puts this country more back in line with how our founding fathers intended it to be. This is a huge win for Americans and a devastating defeat for the Executive branch of government.

  12. … the ruling … should certainly limit [bureaucratic agencies], putting the lawmaking process back in the hands of Congress …

    On paper, sure. In reality, not so much. Agencies will continue to make rules and force the populace to challenge those rules in court which will take years to overturn and require billions of dollars that the populace does not have to throw at such lawsuits.

    I personally do not believe that this ruling will change much of anything.

  13. Too Soon To Gloat,

    If democrats get control of the White House & Congress, Thomas, Alito, Kavanaugh & Gorsuch will be impeached and replaced by extreme leftists. Do not underestimate the power of Ballot Harvest Scams in Big Blue Cities.

  14. “This move upends the agencies’ ability to issue regulations unless Congress has explicitly authorized them to do so.”

    “The Executive (or XYZ agency) is authorized to issue whatever regulations it deems necessary to achieve the intended goal of this legislation.” Howz that for ‘authority’?

    “…the supreme Court shall have appellate Jurisdiction, both as to Law and Fact, with such Exceptions, and under such Regulations as the Congress shall make.”

    The above quote is from Article 3, Section 2, of the US Constitution. Congress can declare certain matters to be outside Judicial review. There’s your Chevron Doctrine writ large. Amazing that Congress (Legislative Branch) has not been more aggressive in reining in Judicial power…without the need for an Amendment.

    • “The Executive (or XYZ agency) is authorized to issue whatever regulations it deems necessary to achieve the intended goal of this legislation.”

      SCOTUS covered this in the decision. Executive departments and agencies are not permitted to make rules only enforce them. Congress can’t delegate their lawmaking power to any other agency.

      If Congress wrote the rule in your example a court would toss it as an unconstitutional delegation of Congress’s legislative powers.

      • “If Congress wrote the rule in your example a court would toss it as an unconstitutional delegation of Congress’s legislative powers.”

        Re-reading Article 2, one finds Congress has the power to prescribe which laws will be reviewable by the Judiciary. And nothing in Article 1 prohibits Congress from transferring power to the Executive.

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