Kentucky Constitutional Carry Bill Now on Gov. Matt Bevin’s Desk

Kentucky Constitutional Carry Bill Now on Gov. Matt Bevin's Desk

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin (AP Photo/Bryan Woolston, File)

We noted the passage and signing into law of Oklahoma’s concealed carry bill last week. That step toward full Second Amendment compliance made the Sooner State the 15th constitutional carry state in the nation. But the Blue Grass state wasn’t far behind.

SB 150 passed the Kentucky Senate overwhelmingly on Friday after earlier clearing the House. And Governor Matt Bevin told wymt.com that he will, in fact, sign it into law.

We got this email from Aaron D. celebrating:

Hey guys. I’ve been very excited about KY Senate Bill 150. I had high hopes once this bill had passed in the Senate but was also skeptical that it would die in a House committee. (Usual KY politics) The bill passed committee, however and went on to a full House vote where many of the usual suspects tried to add amendments designed to kill Constitutional carry in the Commonwealth. Nevertheless the carry bill also passed in the House sans amendments. Gov. Bevin is expected to sign off.

I believe this story deserves its own article… perhaps written by someone more eloquent than I. Thanks fellas.

OK, Aaron, here’s how the AP covered the story:

By BRUCE SCHREINER 

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky lawmakers sided with a powerful gun-rights organization Friday in approving a bill to let people carry a concealed handgun without a permit or training.

The measure, backed by the National Rifle Association, sparked impassioned debate in the House that veered between gun ownership rights and fears of more gun violence. The bill won final passage on a 60-37 vote and goes to Republican Gov. Matt Bevin.

“This comes down to a constitutional right. We have a right in this country to own and bear arms,” Republican Rep. John Blanton said in supporting the measure.

Under the legislation, Kentuckians able to lawfully possess a firearm could conceal their weapons without a license. A gun-carrying permit in the state now carries a fee and a gun safety training requirement. Objections from opponents included dropping the training requirement as a condition for carrying concealed weapons.

“The right to carry a weapon in our society — as with all rights — comes with responsibility,” Democratic Rep. Maria Sorolis said. “And this bill provides no protection for responsibility by gun owners to know their weapon, to be able to use them well.”

Bevin’s office did not immediately respond to an email asking if the governor will sign it into law. Bevin, a staunch conservative, is seeking re-election this year.

If Senate Bill 150 becomes law, Kentucky would become the 16th state to allow adults statewide to carry concealed firearms without permits, according to the NRA.

Kentucky now requires people to get a permit before they can carry a concealed firearm in the state. To do that, they have to undergo a background check, complete some gun safety training and pay a $60 fee.

The legislation would allow people who are at least 21 years old and meet other legal requirements for gun ownership to carry a concealed firearm without a permit.

Supporters said the measure makes no changes regarding where and when people can possess concealed weapons.

The bill sailed through the Republican-led Senate on a 29-8 vote last month.

Supporters of the bill said Kentuckians already can carry weapons openly without any training. But if they carry a gun under a coat, they currently need a permit.

“Wearing a jacket and concealing the firearm should not create a legal requirement for training,” said Republican Rep. Savannah Maddox, who took the lead in shepherding the measure through the GOP-dominated House. “Nor does the Second Amendment allow for the government to assess fees in order to do so.”

While supporters characterized it as enabling people to defend themselves, opponents said having more people armed with concealed weapons without a permit or safety training would create more dangerous situations, including for law enforcement.

“Too many innocent lives are lost because the wrong people got hold of a gun,” said Democratic Rep. Nima Kulkarni.

Democratic Rep. Joni Jenkins said the bill sends the wrong message to Kentuckians that “you have to have a gun to protect yourself.”

“Let’s stop this craziness,” she said. “Let’s take a breath and think about what we’re really doing here.”

Blanton said some of the bill’s opponents were resorting to “fear mongering” with their concerns that it would lead to more gun violence.

“Let’s be realistic,” he said. “How many people are carrying out there today that we don’t have a clue whether or not they’re in possession of a firearm? Whether or not they’re legal to possess a firearm? It’s going on every day, regardless.”

A series of attempts by the bill’s opponents to amend the measure were defeated or ruled out of order on parliamentary grounds. Many of the bill’s supporters and opponents described themselves as gun owners as they joined in during the long debate.

But some Republicans from suburban districts joined in opposing the bill, pointing to their concerns about waiving training requirements for carrying concealed guns.

“This is very difficult,” Republican Rep. Kim Moser, a gun owner and NRA member, said in explaining her vote against the bill as the debate wrapped up. “But I just believe that carrying a concealed weapon carries with it a higher responsibility and it should have a higher threshold.”

comments

  1. avatar barnbwt says:

    Closing on 40% of states with unlicensed carry, aren’t we? C’mon, Texas, let’s go, Texas. Let’s not be the last ones to the party!

    1. avatar Newshawk says:

      Don’t worry, Texas. Even if you are late to the party, you can rest assured that California, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Washington won’t even RSVP, much less show up.

      1. avatar DDay says:

        Don’t forget CT, RI, MA and DE

        1. avatar J says:

          Do not forget that Nevada has gone to the dark side now.

        2. avatar JasonM says:

          Washington is currently ahead of Texas for carry rights. To get a CPL all you need to do is pass a background check and pay the fee. To carry openly all you need to do is get a gun and a holster. And we had both of these programs long before the Luby’s massacre.

      2. avatar pwrserge says:

        Illinois is in the 7th circuit. We could use the same logic to require constitutional carry that the SCotUS used to uphold “gay marriage”. The Schadenfreude would be epic. All we need is that magic number 26. If 26 states make something legal, by SCotUS precedent, it becomes legal in all 50 states.

        1. avatar uncommon_sense says:

          If 26 states make something legal, by SCotUS precedent, it becomes legal in all 50 states.

          Citation please!

        2. avatar pwrserge says:

          Go look up Obergefell v. Hodges. The core of their argument was that due to the fact that most states allowed it, the due process and equal protection clauses kicked in. Rightly or wrongly, the SCotUS agreed.

        3. avatar barnbwt says:

          Ah yes, the “but everybody’s doin’ it!” clause, lol

    2. avatar Madcapp says:

      Simple formula…Kentucky>Texas.

      1. avatar barnbwt says:

        Not for long, I’m thinking; we’re closing in on proper ‘bourbon’ whisky’s quality at an alarming pace. Good booze plus great BBQ…that’s a tough combo to beat. Ya’ll will always have better hiking, though.

    3. avatar TexTed says:

      Rep. Stickland has introduced HB 357 for Constitutional Carry in the State of Texas. Note that we already have Constitutional Carry for long guns.

      https://legiscan.com/TX/bill/HB357/2019

      There are 15 co-sponsors, which is a good start. It has been referred to the House Homeland Security and Public Safety committee, which is chaired by notorious anti-gun Democrat Poncho “Panic Button” Nevarez. I don’t know if he can prevent it from coming for a vote in the committee. Those who live in districts represented by the other members of the committee should write to their representatives and demand they pass the bill out of committee:

      Nevarez, district 74
      Dennis Paul, district 129
      Dewayne Burns, district 58
      Gina Callani, district 132
      Travis Clardy, district 11
      Vikki Goodwin, district 47
      Celia Israel, district 50
      Mike Lang, district 60
      Tony Tinderholt, district 94

      1. avatar TexTed says:

        Note: two of the sponsors of the bill, Tinderholt and Lang, are members of the committee. So really, we only need three more votes to get it moved out of committee.

    4. avatar TruthTellers says:

      LMFAO. Oh you gullible, GULLIBLE people. Don’t you realize how much money Texas makes off those CCW license fees? Tens of Millions of dollars every year. You really think that the state is gonna willfully kill off a huge revenue maker in those fees? You’d be a complete moron to believe so.

      1. avatar barnbwt says:

        Well, they cut the pricetag of licenses to a nominal amount last go-around, so there’s that

  2. avatar million says:

    Democratic Rep. Maria Sorolis said. “And this bill provides no protection for responsibility by gun owners to know their weapon, to be able to use them well.”

    huh?

    1. avatar YuGo HuGo says:

      So it’s ok to be a slobbering idiot and carry open!!

  3. avatar DDay says:

    Look at the states with GOP legislature and Governor. GA, AL, TN, SC, OH, TX, IA, NE, UT.

    Those states need to get this done, ASAP.

    1. avatar Ton E says:

      Here in TN our new Governor Bill Lee initially expressed support for permitless carry then reversed his position on it because of law enforcements opposition to it. I’m just glad I didn’t vote for the guy.

      1. avatar TruthTellers says:

        Because law enforcements’ (who are public servants) edicts trump the will of the citizenry.

        The opinions of LEO when it comes to constitutional rights should be the last that are relied upon when considering legislative changes.

        But as the saying goes, while all animals are equal, some are more equal than others.

    2. avatar Ton E says:

      The GOP aren’t as Pro Gun as people make them out to be.

    3. avatar Clay-in-UT says:

      Utah passed in the House and Senate, but Gary Herbert vetoed it. But since he is Morman, and church approved, he is going no where until he retires, or well… So don’t hold your breath.

      1. avatar TruthTellers says:

        Yeah, I use to think the Mormons were a good bunch of folks, but they’re dumb unto death. All you have to do to bedazzle them into voting for you is bible talk and like a moth to flame, they fly right in.

        Mormons, more like Morons if you ask me who are too stupid to realize they’re electing Morlocks.

  4. avatar Serpent_Vision says:

    Gotta love the concept that carrying a sidearm concealed somehow requires training and licensing to doresponsibly, compared to carrying openly as currently allowed.

  5. avatar Indy Jones says:

    was oklahoma number 15 or 16? i read 16th

    1. avatar GunnyGene says:

      Don’t think it matters much, but where a state lands on the totem pole largely depends on the relative effective dates of the legislation. OK is Nov 1 this year. Don’t know about KY.

    2. avatar Fred says:

      J; was this the old law or the one that Oklahoma just passed? If it’s the new one; what good is a law that says you can carry an unloaded weapon? I hope that was the old law. If not, I wouldn’t consider Oklahoma a constitutional carry state.

  6. avatar GS650G says:

    These full carry states present a problem for future federal gun regulations. If states can legalize pot in defiance of federal law then guns can be allowed in the same way. Watch the left get real angry at that paradox.

    New Mexico’s governor cries the law won’t enforce gun laws while immigration laws are ignored. See how that works?

  7. avatar Godfather says:

    When i am potus i will declare all fitty Constitutional Carry and a machine gun in every good red blooded freedom loving American sheepdogs pickup in case jihad ass shows up!

    1. avatar pwrserge says:

      Sadly, the PotUS doesn’t actually have that power. Though he could declare an indefinite NFA “amnesty” which would more or less gut the MG registry ban.

  8. avatar Tom Rhodes says:

    I find this quote interesting… “The right to carry a weapon in our society — as with all rights — comes with responsibility,” Democratic Rep. Maria Sorolis said. “And this bill provides no protection for responsibility by gun owners to know their weapon, to be able to use them well.”

    I havent seen any bills requiring people to know their mouths and be able to use them well when exercising their right to Free Speech!

    1. avatar GS650G says:

      Even more amazing she thinks politicians can pass laws that replace responsibility.

    2. avatar Jeff Wilksonson says:

      MY continual response to those decrying we regulate the 2nd amendment is to ask them, “Why don’t we regulate the 1st more instead? After all surely speech causes much more harm!”

  9. avatar Gadsden Flag says:

    Good for Kentucky!

  10. avatar uncommon_sense says:

    If Kentucky’s Governor signs this bill into law, does it remove the license requirement only for residents or for everyone (residents and visitors)?

    And I ask the same question about Oklahoma’s new law — does it remove the license requirement only for residents or for everyone (residents and visitors)?

    1. avatar AD says:

      One of the proposed amendments attempted to limit carry to residents only. No amendments passed. Check those out if you have time BTW. Some were ridiculous down to the ground.

  11. avatar J says:

    Kentucky did the Constitutional Carry right with Senate Bill 150. They included all firearms for concealed carry and also car carry in this legislation.

    Persons[, except those specified in subsection (5) of this section,]carrying concealed weapons in accordance with Section 1 of this Act or licensed to carry a concealed deadly weapon pursuant to KRS 237.110 may carry a concealed firearm or other concealed deadly weapon on or about their persons at all times within the Commonwealth of Kentucky, if the firearm or concealed deadly weapon is carried in conformity with the requirements of Section 1 of this Act or KRS 237.110.

    Unless otherwise specifically provided by the Kentucky Revised Statutes 5or applicable federal law, no criminal penalty shall attach to carrying a concealed firearm or other deadly weapon[ with a permit]at any location at which an unconcealed firearm or other deadly weapon may be constitutionally carried.

    Car Carry Section
    A loaded or unloaded firearm or other deadly weapon shall not be deemed concealed on or about the person if it is located in any enclosed container, compartment, or storage space installed as original equipment in a motor vehicle by its manufacturer, including but not limited to a glove compartment, center console, or seat pocket, regardless of whether said enclosedcontainer, storage space, or compartment is locked, unlocked, or does not have a locking mechanism. No person or organization, public or private, shall prohibit a person from keeping a loaded or unloaded firearm or ammunition, or both, or other deadly weapon in a vehicle in accordance with the provisions of this subsection. Any attempt by a person or organization, public or private, to violate the provisions of this subsection may be the subject of an action for appropriate relief or for damages in a Circuit Court or District Court of competent jurisdiction. This subsection shall not apply to any person prohibited from possessing a firearm pursuant to KRS 527.040.

    1. avatar uncommon_sense says:

      Congratulations for Kentucky!

      I wish my state had a provision for long guns in vehicles rather than only allowing unloaded long guns in the trunk or in a case that is inaccessible to vehicle occupants. If I can carry a loaded .44 Magnum revolver with 8-inch barrel or an AR-15 “pistol” in the vehicle, why not a long gun in the vehicle?

    2. avatar AD says:

      Vehicle carry in KY has long been allowed under the existing open carry laws.

  12. avatar J says:

    As you can see in the Kentucky SB150, Car Carry is included in that law. Car Carry will get you in trouble in most states. Does anyone know of other Constitutional Carry states that allow car carry besides Kentucky?

  13. avatar J says:

    Here is another section from Kentucky SB150. You can conceal carry without a license of any weapon now in Kentucky.

    Unless otherwise specifically provided by the Kentucky Revised Statutes or applicable federal law, no criminal penalty shall attach to carrying a concealed firearm or other deadly weapon at any location at which an unconcealed firearm or other deadly weapon may be constitutionally carried.

  14. avatar J says:

    Here is how Gov. Bevin from Kentucky commented on those that did not like those that opposed the SB 150 after it passed the House.

    https://www.wkyt.com/content/news/Kentucky-House-passes-permitless-conceal-carry-bill-goes-to-governors-desk-506561551.html

    “It doesn’t break new ground. It simply says that people do indeed have the right to keep and bear arms,” said Gov Bevin. “… For those people who are offended at this idea and don’t like it, there are other places in America where they could live.”

    1. avatar uncommon_sense says:

      Wow, what big brass balls he has!

    2. avatar John in Ohio says:

      I like his answer. Brass balls indeed!

  15. avatar aircooled says:

    Try saying it this way Democratic Rep. Maria Sorolis “The right to VOTE in our society — as with all rights — comes with responsibility,” “And this bill provides no protection for responsibility by VOTERS to know HOW THE GOVERNMENT WORKS,”

  16. avatar Green Mtn. Boy says:

    Congratulations Kentucky !

    Kaintuck is looking more attractive all the time.

  17. avatar Aleric says:

    KY is a commonwealth, we have a constitution of our own and it negates Federal Regulations that would usurp it or the Constitution of the US. I live in KY and the surrounding states like IN and OH like to pretend they have open carry and the other freedoms we have but each one has so many other requirements that its not true open carry. Heck in IN you cant even transport a weapon with ammo in the same area as the weapon.

    1. avatar John in Ohio says:

      I’m curious, in case i missed something… Except for motor vehicle and bar carry, how is OC regulated in Ohio?

      Congrats, BTW, on your Kentucky bill. Good work!

      1. avatar John in Ohio says:

        “OH like to pretend they have open carry and the other freedoms we have but each one has so many other requirements that its not true open carry.”

        I am serious. What are those “many other requirements”? Even though I open carry everyday in Ohio, I haven’t kept up on current Ohio law.

        Or, was that just misinformation? If so, that’s not a good idea as it might throw off some new people thinking about exercising their RIGHT to carry in Ohio.

        Please clarify.

    2. avatar J says:

      I am from Kentucky also, but live in Commyland of Illinois. Kentucky does a lot of things right for firearms owners. Car carry is a major thing you can not get around. You have to travel from place to place and eventually end up in another state in the country that is not car carry friendly. Kentucky extended car carry that is already allowed in the state to be included SB150. Thank goodness for Kentucky.

  18. avatar Don Skylar says:

    We’re waiting, Texas. Do we have the responsibility?

  19. avatar Joshua Van Hoozer says:

    I live in Kentucky and I’m proud of my state!!!!!

  20. avatar WI Patriot says:

    Sign it or start looking for another job…

  21. avatar J says:

    Here is some sections for the Oklahoma HB2597 bill, Oklahoma Self-Defense Act.
    A person shall be permitted to carry unloaded shotguns, rifles and pistols, without a handgun license as authorized by the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act:
    going to or from the person’s private residence or vehicle
    Firearms in Vehicles
    Any person who is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing a firearm may transport in a motor vehicle a pistol or handgun, loaded or unloaded, at any time.
    Any person, who is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing a firearm may transport in a motor vehicle a rifle or shotgun open or concealed provided the rifle or shotgun is transported pursuant to the requirements of Section 1289.13 of this title.
    It shall be unlawful for any person transporting a firearm in a motor vehicle to fail or refuse to identify that the person is in actual possession of a firearm when asked to do so by a law enforcement officer of this state during any arrest, detainment or routine traffic stop. Any person who violates the provisions of this subsection may be issued a citation for an amount not to exceed One Hundred Dollars ($100.00).
    TRANSPORTING A LOADED FIREARM
    Except as otherwise provided by law, it shall be unlawful to transport a loaded rifle or shotgun in a landborne motor vehicle over a public highway or roadway unless the rifle or shotgun is transported clip-or magazine-loaded not chamber-loaded andin an exterior locked compartment of the vehicle or trunk of the vehicle or in the interior compartment of the vehicle.
    IMPROPER TRANSPORTATION OF FIREARMS
    Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 1272 or 1289.131289.7of this title, any person stopped pursuant to a moving traffic violation who is transporting a loaded pistol in the motor vehicle without a valid handgun license authorized by the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act or valid license from another state, or in violation of any law related to the carrying or transporting of firearms,whether the loaded firearm is concealed or unconcealed in
    It shall be unlawful for any person to fail or refuse to identify the fact that the person is in actual possession of a concealed or unconcealed handgun firearm pursuant to the authority of the Oklahoma Self-Defense Act during the course of any arrest, detainment, or routine traffic stop. Said identification to the law enforcement officer shall be required upon the demand of the law enforcement officer. No person shall be required to identify himself or herself as a handgun licensee or as lawfully in possession of any other firearm if the law enforcement officer does not demand the information. No person shall be required to identify himself or herself as a handgun licensee when no handgun is in the possession of the person or in any vehicle in which the person is driving or is a passenger.

    So you see, no real car carry in Oklahoma. Every states Constitutional Carry legislation is different.

  22. avatar Diksum says:

    Still waiting here in VA.

  23. avatar Moltar says:

    Man are the CCW permit trainers pissed! They’re losing their captive market in Kentucky.

  24. avatar Meg L says:

    Incorrect statement above.
    “A gun-carrying permit in the state now carries a fee and a gun safety training requirement.”
    is incorrect.
    It should read…
    “A (CONCEALED) gun-carrying permit in the state now carries a fee and a gun safety training requirement.”
    Because anyone who can legally own a gun in KY can open carry without a permit.

  25. avatar Chris T in KY says:

    I’m so glad this black conservative settled in Kentucky from California. F#ck the Mulford Act and the current california leadership, Gay, Straight, and Pot Head, who support it.

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