Judge Whose Son Was Murdered, Husband Wounded, Calls for More Privacy for Federal Judges

 

Fromt he AP:

A federal judge from New Jersey is publicly speaking out about a shooting at her New Jersey home last month in which authorities say a disgruntled lawyer killed her son and seriously wounded her husband.

In a video statement issued Monday, Judge Esther Salas called for more privacy for federal judges in the wake of the July 19 attack at her home in New Brunswick.

She noted that serving as judge involves “making tough calls” that sometimes leave people angry and upset. But she said judges should not have to “live in fear for our lives” because personal information, such as home addresses, can be easily obtained by anyone seeking to them or their families harm.

Authorities have said Roy Den Hollander, a men’s rights lawyer, posed as a FedEx delivery person and fatally shot 20-year-old Daniel Anderl and wounded his 63-year-old father, Mark Anderl. Salsa, who was not injured, referred to Den Hollander as “a madman” in her statement..

Den Hollander, 72, was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound on July 20, the day after the ambush. Authorities believe he also shot and killed a fellow attorney in California in the days before the attack at Salas’ home.

comments

  1. avatar Tim says:

    Judges are just like you & me.
    Only ‘better’. 🙂

    1. avatar I Haz A Question says:

      What happened to her family is inexcusable, and I hope her husband and (deceased) son are given justice.

      That being said, this judge now (unfortunately) knows what many LEOs face very day when seeking a balance between performing their duties against criminals (and syndicates?) while in uniform, and protecting their families from retribution. I personally know a LASD undercover detective who has a firm rule of never driving his wife’s car, so as to prevent any disgruntled criminal(s) from coming into town, finding that car, and shooting the occupants. Her car is for her and the kids, and his is for him alone.

      I know little of this Judge Esther Salas and I mourn with her for her loss, but doing her duty as part of the community’s effort to fight crime is not a marshmallow job.

      1. avatar LarryinTX says:

        I would bet any LE would be more in danger from nutbars like this defective than any judge would be, and they’re paid less. This woman made plenty money to afford a “door gun” so that her son and/or husband could fight back.

        1. avatar Vic Nighthorse says:

          They chose not to protect themselves. I look through the camera examine them, make sure they looked at least towards the camera and ask if they can just leave it. I rarely get anything that requires a signature. Even if it seems legit that they need a signature I come out another door with my dog and my hand in my pocket. Not fool proof, but it makes things somewhat more difficult for a bad actor.

        2. avatar Chris T in KY says:

          No special hidden addresses for anyone. I want to know were every government worker lives.
          I’m sick of special treatment being given to anyone who gets a government pay check. Take away the judges immunity from being sued in civil court. She deserved no special protections. If you want the cops to not have immunity. Then take it away for judges, DA’s, and every other government person.

          This judge can wait in line to get a gun. In New Jersey. If she wants protection. Just like Carol Bowen had to wait. In fact Carol Bowen is still waiting to get her gun.

      2. avatar Jackal says:

        Detectives who investigate particular crimes are the exception, I don’t think most cops, meaning patrol cops are at risk. The new normal in law enforcement seems to be to enable and watch certain criminals and domestic terrorists. I think they’ll be fine and enjoy that pension while the rest of us “civilians” have to adjust

      3. avatar Anymouse says:

        The bad guy offed himself, so I’m not sure what more justice is to be had. Sue his estate?

        1. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          True. I guess you’re right.

        2. avatar Victoria Illinois says:

          Good point. Who are you going to sue? His mother? His kids? Probably lots of collateral damage here.

  2. avatar Missouri_Mule Esquire Emeritus says:

    Just what we need – a hidden protected uber class of judiciary elite.

    1. avatar Mark N. says:

      They are not hidden. All of their judicial functions are performed in public, except research and opinion writing. Only their addresses should be hidden, just as, at least in California, the addresses of all LEOs, including retired LEOs, are protected from disclosure by statute. I don’t have a problem with that. The same as I do not have a problem with laws that preclude the public disclosure of addresses of CCW holders.

    2. avatar tdiinva says:

      I know that this might come as a surprise to you but unlike the judge you have an incredibly small set of people who could be pissed enough to want to do you harm. Judges accumulate enemies on a daily basis. It is part of the job. Some people actually do have a stronger right to privacy than you do.

      Life isn’t fair Sunshine.

      1. avatar Chris T in KY says:

        Correct!!! No special treatment for her. She is paid very well. She can hire her own security if she wants to.

      2. avatar Frank says:

        yep, some pigs are more equal than others

        1. I agree with all like minded freedom and liberty folks! Not Special Privileges for Government employees…Reminding THEM all of the 14th Amendment to our Constitution..

      3. avatar Henry Bowman says:

        I must’ve missed the part where Judges are FORCED to serve on the bench. Can you point it out?

        No, you can’t. Because it ain’t there.

        I have a job with risks. Lots of people do. So do judges. I accept that risk. I don’t demand special treatment that sets me apart from everyone else.

        Do you want dictatorship of the elite? Because this is how you get a dictatorship of the elite…. it happens when they stop fearing getting shot because of something they did.

        Fk all of you who think ANY officer of the court should have any more protection than you enjoy. You’re enabling this bull S.

  3. avatar SmarterThenYou says:

    Hollander wanted to see if a (self proclaimed) God could bleed.

    1. avatar enuf says:

      No, he did not. That much is obvious in his actions. He shot the first people he saw and ran like hell. Never saw the judge. His CRAZY took him just so far, and then his cowardice took over.

  4. avatar BLAMMO says:

    When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty.

    Everybody need a little fear.

    1. avatar Phil Wilson says:

      I can understand why they want to keep their families out of it. I would favor more public accountability for judges, but have no issues with them keeping their private lives private. Some judges can be voted out, but with Federal justices it seems the best one can do is vote out the people who appoint them and hope for more law-abiding judges next time. They can be impeached in the House and convicted in the Senate, but with so many judges making decisions based on personal ideology, and with the majority of the House and many in the Senate being just fine with that, we are kind of stuck for now.

      1. avatar PATRON49IFT says:

        When people feel they have no equal chance at justice they become frustrated. Some become so frustrated they turn to violence as their only remaining option since they think there is no other recourse. Not saying it is correct but that is what happens.

        Imagine if normal folks took similar actions against elected officials who they thought would not listen and act appropriately in carrying out the duties of their elected or appointed offices. Like those trying to do away with the Second Amendment for one thing. Does anyone else think the time is approaching swiftly when this kind of approach to dealing with corrupt elected officials will become normal or at least not unheard of?

        We all know that trying to unseat an incumbent is nearly impossible since the deck is stacked in their favor every time. What if you live in an area controlled solidly by one political party that you see trying to undermine your rights giving you no recourse. Do you; move away. what if you cannot? Do you continue to try to vote them out only to be frustrated? How long do you take it? Would you turn to violence as a solution? Look at what is happening to many major cities where the politicians are doing nothing to protect their citizens. What would you realistically do if you lived there? I know we all talk about what WE would do but would we really?

        1. avatar Steve says:

          Nobody knows what they’d do until it happens. Some like to think theh do, but we don’t – unless that person is a sociopath.

          That being said, the Fascist-Left is already engaging in acts of intimidation against public officials, and actual violence will eventually follow. (Like they already commit upon Conservative journalists). This is how a very small percentage of the population can force Far-Left policies onto everyone else.

          Conservatives, as a group, do not engage in intimidation practices like the mobs of crazed leftists do, but we may have to consider adopting similar practices … unless we’re willing to live in an American version of Venezuala/Communist China/Soviet Russia.

          Taking the high road is morally commendable, but the left is setting the rules of engagement in a culture war (With many of them literally wanting to lock is in “re-education camps”) and sooner or later we will have to wake up and start pushing back … hopefully it won’t be too late.

        2. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          All too true. Remember that Castro took Cuba’s government with an estimated force of about 50 operatives, and Russia was overthrown by only about 400 Communists. If allowed to act, a small force of dedicated Marxists in key positions can/will pose serious threat to our Republic.

      2. avatar enuf says:

        I agree that judges should have substantial rights of privacy, very strong protections under the law. It should be very difficult for a criminal to learn where a judge lives, where family members live, etc.

        These should be the very same protections under the law that every American Citizen enjoys.

        Not possible though, too much corporate profit is generated by mining and leveraging our personal data. Their lobbyists would never tolerate it.

    2. avatar tdiinva says:

      I just love the misuse of out of context quotes. I don’t think fear of the people is meant to cover criminals. You ought to move to Minneapolis where “the people” no longer fear the government and the government is in fear of at least some of the people.

      1. avatar Chris T in KY says:

        (smile)

  5. avatar chuck u farley says:

    ACTIONS and DECISIONS have CONSEQUENCES. If you aren’t willing to live with your actioms and decisions, DON’T MAKE THEM!!!

    1. avatar Mark N. says:

      That’s a load of crap. In every, and I mean EVERY civil or criminal case, there is one side that wins and one side that loses. At the trial court level, there is one person, the judge, whose function it is to make those decisions. And the fact is that some people who justifiably lose don’t take it too well and can act out violently against the people they deem responsible for their loss. It is not infrequent in family law. Ex- spouses, opposing counsel, the miscreant’s own counsel, and judges have all been targeted by the losing party, both in and outside the courtroom.

      1. avatar Miner49er says:

        Thanks for your observations Mark.

        I’m sorry that so many on this list do not understand how important the rule of law, and mechanisms set up by the constitution, are to holding the fabric of society together.

        Sometimes that judge is all that stands between an authoritarian, extremist government and a lowly citizen taxpayer.

        To see so many posters on this list so casually discuss killing judges is eye-opening.
        I wonder if they realize how much they have in common with the extremist of the 60s, remember when they taped a shotgun to the judges neck because they didn’t like his rulings.

        1. avatar Sam I Am says:

          “Sometimes that judge is all that stands between an authoritarian, extremist government and a lowly citizen taxpayer.”

          You stand between tyranny and whatever, you are likely to get shot. Judges are not special persons. They are not royalty. They are merely government employees, like millions of other government employees. Judges get paid for the full range of responsibilities, rewards and risks. Haven’t run into any jurist who was dragooned into being a judge, and held to that position under threat of harm to relatives, or self.

          That judges are killed, family members killed, is tragic. That doesn’t, however, assign them to the list of endangered species.

        2. avatar Chris T in KY says:

          to Miner49er
          I have no love for judges. It was judges who said the government could force “separate but equal” on to private businesses. It was judges who said a black person born in this country was not a citizen.
          No special treatment for judges. Judges have caused most of the problems we currently have in this country. Judges should have their immunity taken away. They shouldn’t be protected from civil law suits.

        3. avatar Someone says:

          As we see more and more, judges as a part of the government have very little incentive to stand against the same government to protect the “lowly” tax payer.

    2. avatar enuf says:

      Bullshit. America was founded upon the Rule of Law, not the Rules of Sparta (the movie version).

      EVERYONE deserves the sort of protection of personal and private information that judge is talking about. It should not be easy, which it is, for anyone to create a detailed dossier on you, your family, your kids, your parents and the most detailed and private aspects of your lives.

      You can buy that sort of information on most anyone because it exists in countless corporate data bases.

      1. avatar Chris T in KY says:

        There is no privacy left in the USA. It dissolved in the digital world of the 20th century.

  6. avatar MB (the real MB) says:

    How about just better defense of 2nd amendment rights, and learn to defend yourself. The police can’t be everywhere for everyone, including judges. In America everyone is suppose to be equal, including judges, politicians and police, not with special rules for protection. All lives matter.

    1. avatar Mark N. says:

      True enough, but that doesn’t mean we have to make it easy for them to be targeted away from the bench, where they have armed security and metal detectors, by allowing public access to their personal information.

      1. avatar PATRON49IFT says:

        I think you would agree that a determined individual with some skills could locate just about anyone they want. There are inherent dangers in all jobs. You sign up for those jobs and the inherent dangers of your own free will. I get it that there are crazies out there (just look at Portland and Seattle) who are unhinged and they will always be ‘a thing’.

        We cannot protect everyone from everyone else if there is no law and order AND swift consequences for unlawful actions. Many judges are notoriously lenient on criminals as indicated by the numerous individuals you hear about with lengthy criminal records, many felonies who are released time and again to commit more crime. There is a cost for this leniency which must be paid. It is usually paid by society at large where innocent individuals are attacked, raped, murdered and more. If those in positions of authority also suffer some of that cost, I’m ok with that. They are after all, just part of the larger society and deserve no more special treatment than you or I. They’re lives are worth no more than mine or yours are to us.

  7. avatar Thinker1 says:

    All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others. Orwell’s visions revealed daily.

    1. avatar Jackal says:

      And Nietzsche was right regarding the master and slave moralities

      1. avatar ChoseDeath says:

        And what did Friedrich say about those things pray tell?

  8. avatar rt66paul says:

    Maybe all judges and people in the public eye should be offered :protective custody”. They could spend their off work hours at the county jail with bad cops and weenie waggers.

    1. avatar KenW says:

      I wish the online industry that makes money by selling your personal details could be destroyed Why should I have to spend time each month finding all the new sites that have my name, address, age and in some cases who I am related to available so I can request it be removed.. Sometimes you can download all sorts of info on someone for free sometimes for a few dollars. This makes identity theft easier and makes it easier to scam someone if you know details about them.

      1. avatar Your homosexuality isn’t personal protected information says:

        Ken, then if you’re so worried stop buying gay porn!

        1. avatar KenW says:

          My Mye, I have my very own troll.
          I Haz , J Campbell and others should be so jealous that they are no longer special.

        2. avatar LarryinTX says:

          Yeah, Ken, and their trolls aren’t even queer!

        3. avatar KenW says:

          Since I am now the new target of a troll I thought I would see how to take care of them.
          This site looks pretty good.
          https://www.uglyhedgehog.com/t-283130-1.html
          So little pink floof ball of fur ( per that site I am to name the troll ) welcome to the hood.

        4. avatar Get Down Do You? says:

          Notice how KenW went to all that trouble to reply yet didn’t deny the charge leveled against him 🤔?

        5. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          Ken,

          Don’t be too flattered. It looks likely to be just one person, rotating random usernames. When I started noticing my own “fan club” forming, I thought “gee, I’ve made it to the big leagues, complete with my own hecklers”, but soon realized that anklebiters aren’t that special. The real trolls are the ones that incite controversy and inspire lengthy conversational threads, such as pwrSerge, Miner49, and a few others who seem to be gone now. We seem to be left with one or two little orphan troll-ettes who sense the absence of real trolling talent and are trying desperately to get attention.

          BTW, you’re welcome to take All Hail! and TheBSonTTAG. I’ll keep Haz Fan Club if he/she is still here. 🙂

        6. avatar Geoff "Ammo. LOTS of ammo..." PR says:

          Serge isn’t a troll in the typical troll sense, Haz.

          He’s a ‘true believer’. He *argues* his positions, he doesn’t just fling accusations of homosexuality, like the gutless little fuckwits in TTAG… 🙂

        7. avatar Goof “I’m a choad” PR says:

          …writes the king of all cowardly fuckwits.

        8. avatar Ron says:

          Who cares if he’s gay? Why do YOU care so much? Are you interested in him?

        9. avatar Someone says:

          Are you suggesting that there is something wrong with homosexuality? Your woke friends will cancel you in two seconds for implying such thing.

  9. avatar The Crimson Pirate says:

    This whole thing smells.

    I’m surprised she did take the opportunity to criticize the obviously lax gun laws in New Jersey and New York.

    1. avatar The Crimson Pirate says:

      did not

  10. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

    Nope.

    If you can’t take the heat, get out of the kitchen, honey.

  11. avatar DanDoc says:

    at least, unless i missed something, she didnt call for a ban on guns…

    1. avatar GS650G says:

      The overloads in Jersey already have.

  12. avatar Matt in Oklahoma says:

    A lot of tough talk from folks who work in safe jobs

    1. avatar ChoseDeath says:

      Know that for a fact do you? Nice counter argument, well nuanced.

      1. avatar Tough Talker says:

        If you’re commenting on this site during the workday, it’s safe to assume you’re not doing so from a squad car or firebase.

        1. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

          A poor assumption, because some of us don’t get paid to be firefighters/EMT’s.

          Those in cushy, unionized jobs get paid quite well to stand around and watch rioters burn down cities…

        2. avatar Vic Nighthorse says:

          For years, I delivered palliative narcotics in Mpls and often had time during the day to squander my time here. Not sure how that compares to being a cop but I often made deliveries of large quantities hydromorphone and fentynal to neighborhoods so bad that the people I was delivering to were afraid to answer the door especially at night even when I called them from the car and told them exactly when to expect me. Other people have to be careful too, not just cops and soldiers.

        3. avatar Hannibal says:

          uh you don’t think someone can (1) access their phone in a patrol car or (2) have days off or (3) have a shift that starts in the evening and so be commenting before then?

          You’re not real bright, are you?

    2. avatar Safety first says:

      Most cops and judges are not risking their lives

    3. avatar Someone says:

      My job is in top 10 most dangerous occupations. Cops are no. 16. Judges didn’t make top 35 and I doubt they are in top 100. This s not Mexico.

  13. avatar merlin grayman says:

    judge.
    go to hell.
    live with the consequences of your rulings.

    1. avatar Merlin The Intolerable says:

      …and I bet you consider yourself a Christian.

    2. avatar Mark N. says:

      So even if the judge is right, that judge should have to live with the consequence of being targeted by the losing party? Is that what you are saying? Or would you rather single shot pistols at 20 paces?

      In every dispute, SOMEONE has to decide who wins and who loses.

  14. avatar former water walker says:

    Pay your own way leftjudge…sorry your kid died. And husband shot. My sympathy only extends to them!

  15. avatar Chris Mallory says:

    No. The personal info of every government employee should be public record. No exceptions. Fear of the citizens is a good thing for government employees to have.

    1. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

      Bingo.

    2. avatar I Haz A Question says:

      It is public record, but the proliferation of data mining and collection sites in the Age Of Interwebs has made finding someone’s address extremely easy now. What most people don’t realize is that nearly all data collection sites are controlled by only several major companies, and if you spend perhaps one hour going through their free opt-out procedures, you can scrub your name and related info (address, history, family relatives, phone/email contacts, etc.) from view. Some sites have “spiders” that automatically sweep the Web and may pick your info back up down the road, but most honor your opt-out request permanently. I’ve done this to great success, and perform re-checks annually. Today, if you put my true full name into Google or any data collection site, nothing comes up. Only takes an hour. Of course, those same sites sometimes make your info available thru their pay portals, but that requires the searching party to divulge his/her identity and payment info, removing anonymity. But at least the free searches are blank.

      This judge could have done this to cloak herself, or had her son do it. There is no need to call for extra “protections” for judges. They can cover their online tracks like the rest of us can, and carry a gun to deal with any threats that slip through.

      1. avatar X marks the spot says:

        So why don’t you be helpful and list those several companies for others instead of humblebragging how much smarter you are than everyone?

        1. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          Sure. Instead of you taking maybe ten seconds to type “personal data opt out” into your favorite search engine and seeing it for yourself, I can give you my list. Whether you’re All Hail, TheBSonTTAG, or Fan Club, the only reason I can think of why you’ve been nipping at my heels for months now is that I must have called one of your outrageous bluffs some time ago. In any case, here you are:

          A good place to start is http://www.optout.com.

          My list:

          411
          BeenVerified
          Callersmart
          Checkthem
          DOBSearch
          FamilyTreeNow
          IDTrue
          InstantCheckMate
          InstantPeopleFinder
          Intelius
          MyLife
          MyRelatives
          Nuwber
          Peekyou
          PeopleFinder
          PeopleFinders
          PeopleLookup
          PrivateEye
          PublicRecords
          PublicRecords.dir
          PublicRecords360
          Radaris
          Spokeo
          Telephonedirectories.us
          Truepeoplesearch
          Truthfinder
          USA-People-Search
          USSearch
          Voterrecords
          Whitepages
          Zabasearch

        2. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          The first time, you’ll need to go through all the sites you can find, as the parent companies update their subsidiaries from their main databases every few months. Once you complete your list, the next time you check (wait six months or so), you’ll find that your info is permanently gone from at least 90% of them, and you might only need to “clean” maybe one or two sites every year from that point forward.

          That offer of a free hug is still open. 🙂

        3. avatar KenW says:

          I Haz, the only problem is I’ve opted out and have hit probably every one of those sites and a few others at least once. But like weeds I reappear or my wife does every few weeks on some site so I get to start all over. And some do not make it easy to get off their list.

        4. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          Ken,

          It’s worked well for me, my wife, our adult children, my siblings, etc. Every time I re-check once per year, I find one of our names refreshed somewhere on only one or two places, which are quickly removed again. The vast majority of all opt-outs I’ve done over the years have resulted in permanent removals.

      2. avatar Curtis in Illinois says:

        I Haz a Question, you are utterly clueless.

        Voter registration data and voting records are public information. Real estate deeds and liens, assessment and property tax data, all public and readily searchable, right from government web sites. If you are an elected official who is required to be a registered voter and live in a certain jurisdiction, such searching becomes pretty easy.

        I don’t know about New Jersey, but many states have laws enabling such data to be hidden if you are a judge, LEO, prosecutor, etc.

        1. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          Yes, clueless, as you say. You’re the boss. Even after successfully covering my own tracks that even Google hasn’t been able to re-locate for the past decade, what was I thinking, lol?

          You’re correct that the information remains public. But if you actually read my comment (did you, really?), you’ll see that I chose my words carefully and stated that the info is often still accessible, but after you opt out of those sites’ general inquiries (the free search sections), then anyone looking for you will need to go through the paywalls. And that removes the searcher’s anonymity, plus most people don’t want to pay.

          The trolls are out in force today…

        2. avatar All Hail! says:

          Please do not besmirch the sacred (albeit highly confusing and contradictory) words of the inestimable ‘I Haz A Question’.

        3. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          August 3, 2020

          RE: TERMINATION OF ASSOCIATION

          Mr. Hail,

          It is with my deepest regrets (chuckle, snort) that, due to current economic conditions, I must inform you of my need to downsize and release my entourage. Be assured that I explored every option in the hopes of retaining your services, but to no avail.

          The good news is that KenW is taking on new fans, so you’ve been reassigned to smooch on his keister. Good luck, and all the best on your future endeavors.

          Signed,
          Haz

          ENCL: Final Box of Scooby Snacks

        4. avatar Geoff "Ammo. LOTS of ammo..." PR says:

          Nice! Fire your troll!!!

          (You were too nice with the parting Scooby-Snacks…)

        5. avatar All Hail! says:

          I don’t think I’ll let you fire me today, Haz.

        6. avatar I Haz A Question says:

          Not to worry, Geoff. That final box was sweetened with Choco-Lax. Hail never knew the difference when I let my dog drool on the contents of previous boxes, anyway.

        7. avatar KenW says:

          I Haz, only problem will be the poor troll will be all alone for long periods since I do not frequent this site as much as some of you do. And you know the saying “idle hands are the devil’s tools”. So you might find yourself being attacked by bored trolls. Similar to horn flies they need to be swatted constantly.

          And what’s with the gay crap these trolls seem to spew? Why can’t a these new trolls at least try to carry on a semi intelligent conversation? My guess is they are 10 years old or stuck in that mindset. If I was gay which I am not should not bother anyone here anyway. It does not bother me to see 2 men walking hand in hand but just like hetero couples overt acts of sexuality should not be out in the open. So I just ignore the gay references.

          Also new trolls, do not expect to get any scooby snacks. I run a free range troll farm.

    3. avatar Chi-Chi Montezuma says:

      This. Who they are and what they do on the job should be publicly listed online daily.

      1. avatar Miner49er says:

        Who they are and what they do each day is already listed each day, it’s called the docket.

        What should not be readily accessible is their home address as it does not pertain to their work on the bench. The constitution, and the laws derived thereof, contain many legal remedies if you feel a judge is not treating you fairly, perhaps you should avail yourself of some of these before you strap up.

  16. avatar Wiregrass says:

    Like he couldn’t have just followed her home one day from the court.

    1. avatar Chi-Chi Montezuma says:

      But acknowledgement of that wouldn’t let her try to be a special secret judge. Surprised she didn’t ask to wear a hood.

  17. avatar Cloudbuster says:

    What this really was, is that now she’ll think twice about handing down the “wrong” ruling in the case against Deutsche Bank involving Epstein’s investments.

  18. avatar GS650G says:

    So Salas is in favor of making doxxing illegal then?

  19. avatar Curtis in Illinois says:

    I’m disappointed at many of the comments above.

    People paint ALL elected officials with the same brush, accuse them ALL of being self-serving and corrupt, and slander them ALL, en masse. Collectively, we elect people to run our governments and then insult the people we elect. Is it any wonder that good candidates are hard to find?

    Self government doesn’t work unless good people are willing to take the risks and make the sacrifices necessary to run and serve in elected office. If you think those risks and sacrifices should include putting your family at serious risk, then prepare to have an acute shortage of qualified candidates.

    Judges are required to make decisions on a daily basis that profoundly affect people’s lives. They preside over the most emotionally-charged conflicts (family law, violent felonies) where someone is going to be royally pissed off, regardless of the resolution. If we don’t provide some level of protection for them and their families, we will be left with judges who seek such positions for all the wrong reasons.

    1. avatar Darkman says:

      Wrong Reasons…Sorry but that has been happening since before I was born and I’m an Old Bastard. Exactly why people have little faith in government officials. They generally vote for the lesser of the Evils. All government is corrupted/able. Unfortunately outside of every person for themselves. It’s the best We the People can hope for.

    2. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

      Since removing a corrupt judge is nearly impossible, yes, we citizens tend to get rather churlish about the entire group of them.

      When judges decide that they can exceed their jurisdiction and over-reach their constitutional authority without consequence, yes, we citizens tend to view the entire group with fury.

      Judges and cops have brought their problems upon themselves. They refuse to police their own ranks and get rid of those who are incompetent, won’t read the Constitution and who have novel theories of how they should perform their jobs.

      Consider the case of Alcee Hastings: One of the few federal judges removed by Congress, Hastings then runs for the Congress and gets elected. Congress, having a convenient case of amnesia, seats him and allows him to stay in Congress, when they had the power to eject him from the Congress.

  20. avatar Darkman says:

    I’ve always found it Humerus how people with a comfortable sense of reality. Believe all is well in their world. Until reality pays them a visit. A strong dose of reality has been and will always be. The best educator.

    1. avatar LarryinTX says:

      Fine and dandy, but if it costs a son, it is too expensive.

      1. avatar Darkman says:

        Reality is Free. Learning from it is Hard.

  21. avatar 24and7 says:

    i call for term limits and mandatory retirement for moronic federal and supreme court judges..

  22. avatar Montana Actual says:

    Sounds like a pretty shitty judge to me.

    That’s not how this works.

  23. avatar Charlemagne says:

    There also need to be adequate checks and balances on judges. In my native state of Idaho. Most judges resign before their term of office is up so their immediate successors are appointed rather than elected as provided in the Idaho State Constitution. Judges decide for themselves if they should be disqualified from hearing a case because of bias! And the Idaho Judicial Council has a long record of refusing to take action in cases of judicial misconduct.

  24. avatar Randy Jones says:

    “She heard the sound of bullets”? May have heard the sound of gunfire, but I doubt she heard the bullets.

    I guess this means she will not be a compassionate judge that lets criminals out of jail on Covid-19 releases.

    I do feel for her loss, but her loss is no different than the losses of four dozen families in Chicago last weekend.

    If the solution she wants is just to keep silent and secrete the information of judges, I ask how much better she believes she is that everyone else. It seems that the NYT released a tuck road of gun owners in NYC a few years back, nothing happened to them, but no doubt a number of firearms and homes were broken into. What about our information.

  25. avatar Elmer Fudd says:

    I can sympathize with judge Esther Salas. My brother was murdered by a career criminal that a judge had allowed to remain free on his own recognizance. More recently, Judge Ladd Wiles of Yamhill County Oregon give my marijunna bootlegging tenant a free pass for firing two rounds from a 12 gauge shotgun, probably loaded with slugs, at my son. This moron didn’t want to hear about the Marijunna “because it’s legal now.”. Judge Wiles should have remembered that his own wife, former US Attorney for the State of Oregon Amanda S Marshall, was prosecuting criminals with similar illegal operations when she wasn’t to busy performing fellacio on her subordinates. (Google it). Perhaps if more Judges had their families murdered, they might begin to hold criminals accountable.

  26. avatar Elmer Fudd says:

    I’ve read that there is some evidence that this murder might have been a romantic triangle situation. This of course reminds me of a classic song:

    https://youtu.be/BEULVyg1O_8

  27. avatar Chi-Chi Montezuma says:

    You ain’t special black robe. Get in line for a gun permit Jersey girl.

  28. avatar Sam I Am says:

    Judges actively seek the perks, prestige, position, respect of being on the bench, but want none of the risks.

    Perhaps judges should be housed in stone compounds, with 24/7 security.

    The judiciary has become the oligarchy the founders warned of.

  29. avatar Cale15 says:

    She chose to become a judge! You screw enough people over your bound to get repaid the favor!

  30. avatar NORDNEG says:

    Maybe if judges made ruling’s according to traditional written laws, already on the books instead of making rulings by how they feel about the case , (not saying that’s what happened) this stuff wouldn’t have happened. There is wayyyy too many activist judges out there. So no on the secrecy ballony, live with the rest of the deplorable’s…

    1. avatar Prndll says:

      Judges are going to make enemies no matter what they do. That’s why federal judges are appointed and not elected. She really should know already that the best thing she can do is not say anything publicly. I wonder how well she is trained with firearms.

  31. avatar Green Mtn. Boy says:

    The self esteemed judge should realize she is not special, just another citizen, or aren’t all animals equal.

  32. avatar TJW says:

    Judge Salsa. That’s funny.

  33. avatar enuf says:

    A horrible crime, just awful. Heart goes out to those who survive.

    “This monster knew where I lived and what church we attended and had a complete dossier on me and my family.”

    No one’s private info should be on the internet unless they put it there. It should be a felony to “doxx” someone who is not a criminal, which is the publication of private and personal data.

    It is terrible what happend to this family. Trouble is that any determined killer will be able to figure out where a person lives.. Especially one with the contacts and access of the lawyer that turned killer.

    The answer to that is vigilence, preparedness and planning. For which a judge, having a significant income, can easily afford. Maybe we need a handbook for them, for when they take the job. Possibly an annual refresher in home and office security.

    For the rest of us I favor tax rebates and credits. Put in a steel frame entry door with reinforced deadbolts, write it off your taxes. Buy a gun and take a defensive shooting class, write it off your taxes. Install a video doorbell or security camera system, write it off your taxes.

    Highly paid public officials can afford such things.

    The rest of us just have to make do with what we got.

    And hell yes to privacy laws to protect everybody, not just a judge.

  34. avatar Retro says:

    Fine, let’s extend her idea to everyone involved in the legal system. Jurors get to be anonymous. Lawyers, cops, prison guards, hell, let’s extend it to parolees, ex-cons and sex offenders.

    Or even better, how about we pass a law making it a federal felony offense to release someone’s personal info without their explicit written permission?

    Either we all have a right to privacy or no one does.

  35. avatar Specialist38 says:

    How would you do that?
    Anonymous judging? Mask? Alter ego?
    What could possibly go wrong?

    Terrible thing that happened to your family.

    You have a high-profile job that may put you at risk in certain cases.

    A former sheriff in our county was investigating an old murder case and the suspect killed his wife. Terrible, but this is reality.

    Nut-up or shift to some powder-puff court.

  36. avatar Prndll says:

    She has just as much right to own guns for self defense as I do. Home envisions happen all the time and are often random in nature. What does she want? Secret Service protection? She would get that if she would run for president?

    My point is that she is no better than anyone else.

    What is her view of the second amendment?

  37. avatar cgray says:

    If judges don’t do anything wrong, they don’t have anything to worry about, right?

    Every judge’s, prosecutor’s, and police officer’s address should be publicly available.

    They do work for the peasants, after all.

    1. avatar Huntmaster says:

      If you didn’t do anything wrong then you have nothing to worry about. That is what they tell us. Anybody want to bet this an Anti 2 Amendment judge?.

  38. avatar Arc - The annoying one says:

    Wow, look a that! A judge that suddenly thinks privacy is a GOOD thing! How about advocating for privacy for ALL OF US and not a special class of people; maybe then I’ll get on board with it.

    You have to fight with claws and tail in this day and age to keep privacy.

    Its a lot to learn for the uninitiated, but start with PGPtools and create a key pair, mail your public key to the recipient, hand deliver it, etc. Nothing is ever 100% secure but is accurately rated by confidence. VeraCrypt for file protection. Both of these tools can be doubled up with self-destroying notes and a hardware encrypted drive. Using obfuscation, Nord/ExpressVPN, etc.

    Judge should have one residence on paper, and in actuality, live at another.

  39. avatar adverse6 says:

    Give them their own private cell.

  40. avatar Jim Bullock says:

    It seems to me that quite a few people are acting out violently, P-O-ed at any number of other folks. The sin of whiteness is an explicit target, n rousting people on the street, where they work, and at their homes is OK to address it.

    While “government officials” get bugged when it comes at them, it comes at a lot of other folks with lesser platforms.

  41. avatar BierceAmbrose says:

    It’s an esoteric reference, especially for a judge, but the US Consitution has something to say about titles of nobility n such.

    I think a judge — or any working official — really shouldn’t have more anonymity or protection than citizens in general. If it’s not safe enough for them, it’s not safe enough for the rest of us.

    1. avatar enuf says:

      Could not agree more.

      Problem is the availability of personal and private information is a serious problem. Less so for anyone who would never be the target of a deranged (or perfectly sane but EVIL) killer. Still, your information is out there. Owned by countless corporate entities. Your information is available for purchase, for automated search, for both legal and illegal uses.

  42. avatar BierceAmbrose says:

    Wait, Judge Target, there thinks she’s the only one who pisses off other people in the course of doing her job?

    She clearly has never met me.

  43. avatar Jim Bullock says:

    Here’s another example.

    When pressed hard enough on her animus about guns, DiFi refers back to a truly horrible shooting event she experienced years ago. It was horrible. Horrible things happen (can happen – ed) with guns. So, ban all the things: mmmmm-kay.

    We don’t let victims of violence prosecute the offenders, let along make laws from within their grief … because they’re maybe not sane right then, n might think of their own direct experience vs. what’s a rule for living for a whole society.

    No amout of reason counteracts that pain and horror. BUT, by reason we can discern the *other* pain and horror* bad policy will cause. Insisting that her pain and horror must determine what is done is either willfully legislating while insane and you know it, or declaring that your pain and horror trumps those other people’s — they’re expendible.

    Judge Salas, as a human, has all the support I can muster.

    As a public official she needs to shut up. “I’m shocked and in pain.” is the worst qualification for making broad policy for others. Judges’ role is to be the opposite of performative advocates — to keep us in our enganglement n passion from some horror from doing something worse. She’s not acting as a judge right now. (How many of them do, how often is another whole rant.)

    1. avatar Jim Bullock says:

      Pls pardon the typos.

      This kind of personal hijacking of official authority makes me ranty, whatever the topic. The folks in their grief are flailing; of course.

      I’m really, really, really pissed-off at the apparatcheks and agenda-mongers who exploit them. Whoever put her in front of a camera n fed her a script is scum.

      1. avatar Prndll says:

        Just like those that are putting Biden in the presidential race instead of under a doctors care.

  44. avatar Darkman says:

    Judges and lawyers are just another part of “The Swamp”. That needs to be drained and reclaimed. Under the authority of the Declaration of Independence. Then sent to Education Camps to be taught “The Constitution”. Since the first time it was never taught or they refused to learn it.

    1. avatar Mark N. says:

      The vast majority of the practice of law has little if anything to do with the Constitution. Torts, contracts, probate and estates, business disputes, domestic relations, employment law, workers’ compensation, and so forth and so on. Criminal law has more than a passing acquaintance with it, as do some facets of federal administrative law practice and civil rights litigation. Otherwise, not so much. The Constitution, aside from the amendments, is the master plan for a form of government, and that doesn’t come up very often in the practice of law. It does not set out the substantive rules nor the statutes and ordinances that regulate human interactions. Last but not least, the law is a living thing that changes as circumstances warrant and society itself changes.

  45. avatar Zack says:

    I agree, the people destroying this country deserve even more protection from their victims.

  46. avatar Ben Bow says:

    What an idiot. I know where nearly every judge in my area, federal and state lives, and its not because I care to know, its because nearly every sitting judge, especially federal ones, are conceded pricks, who think they are better than everyone else, and want / have a big showy house. Its their money, let them spend it how they want.

    BUT, don’t become a government bureaucrat, with literal power of life and death over people, with hoards of government employees kissing your rear end every day telling you how smart and wonderful you are, and think you can hide from the people. Judge’s, Senators, Reps, and the like, should ALL have their home addresses publicly available to anyone remotely interested. A little fear from the citizens for how you screw them is necessary. At the same time, judges, and the like, should be made to go through the same security procedures at the court house everyone else must go through. Some of these court houses you almost have to strip to get in. Would not happen if the judges had to do it.

    While there is no room in our republic for political violence, we must keep our judges, senators and reps closely grounded to the people as possible

  47. avatar Ralph says:

    I’ve known many judges in my lifetime of practicing law. Not a single one of them deserved more protection than a cab driver (8-10 killed per 100,000 workers, almost twice the rate of police officers) or a pizza delivery man (about 38 deaths per 100,000 workers). Federal judges? Seven killed in the last 45 years.

    The rules of the game change mighty fast once judges have skin in it. Well, of course the rules change. Judges make the rules.

  48. avatar Hannibal says:

    “But she said judges should not have to “live in fear for our lives” because personal information, such as home addresses, can be easily obtained by anyone seeking to them or their families harm.”

    No one should have to live in that fear. Yet everyone has their personal information readily available whether they like it or not. That best one can do is try and limit or confuse the information. It’s a part time job to go trawling through all the various ‘people finding’ sites and deal with them.

    If the judge would like to push for a national privacy law that would allow people to stop their address etc from being published she should do that.

  49. avatar WI Patriot says:

    “Judge Whose Son Was Murdered, Husband Wounded, Calls for More Privacy for Federal Judges”

    Sorry, nope, you’re a public official, so…

  50. avatar Huntmaster says:

    They need to live in the same society we do.

    1. avatar WI Patriot says:

      The society they helped create and shape…

  51. Proposed 13 June 1866
    Ratified 9 July 1868

    1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

  52. avatar possum says:

    Perhaps they should use fake names and hide behind a curtain.if I was a judge my name would be, Judge Mentday and everybody would get the death sentence.

  53. avatar Narcoossee says:

    This is common in Florida. Here’s a quote from the Tampa Bay Times:

    Under Florida Statute 119.071, the list of property owners who may qualify for a confidential address now includes firefighters, EMTs, human resources managers (and assistant managers), code enforcement officers, tax collectors, juvenile probation officers, house parents, therapists, counselors, inspectors with the Department of Business and Professional Regulation and even people work in the internal audit department of a government agency.

    That’s in addition to victims of violent crime, police, judges, state and federal prosecutors, public defenders, special magistrates and child enforcement hearing officers.

    https://www.tampabay.com/news/business/realestate/cant-find-that-house-in-public-records-it-could-have-a-protected-address/2336718/

  54. avatar asdf says:

    Why can’t EVERYONE be given more privacy?

    Like in Texas… you have to have your home address printed on your drivers license… unless you are a battered woman, or a cop. Why??? The state still has the real pysical address. (Why even print addresses on the things, but I digress…)

    Other states allow PO boxes which greatly improve privacy and safety.

  55. avatar Anonymous says:

    Need I mention that in much of the country, if you register to vote, you’ve already made public your home address?

    Like you did when you signed the mortgage papers, and didn’t use a trust or LLC to hold title.

    On the quasi-private side, when you use your name and home address for any bills, utilities, etc. Gave your address to the dentist. Doctor. Etc. Even my freakin’ pharmacy looks me up by my (erroneous) birth date.

    Privacy is something you cannot have when you need it. You have to want it ahead of time, and plan accordingly.

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