Gear Review: Franklin Armory BFSIII 22-C1 Binary Trigger For Ruger 10/22

 

I mean, finally, right? This is the binary trigger we’ve all been waiting for. If, like me, you worry that you aren’t shooting up your .22 LR ammo fast enough, the Franklin Armory BFSIII 22-C1 Binary Firing System will fix that right up for you.

Designed to work in any Ruger 10/22 compatible firearm, such as this Radical Firearms RF/22, the 22-C1 trigger provides three firing modes:

The lever on the ambidextrous safety selector points toward the depiction of the selected firing mode. Above, the 22-C1 is on “safe.”

Standard semi-automatic.

And binary firing mode.

In the off chance that you aren’t familiar, a binary trigger fires on trigger pull and then again upon trigger release. Two shots for each full back-and-forth cycle of the trigger. Which means you can effectively double your rate of fire.

Federally, this does not meet the definition of a “machine gun” so a Binary Firing System-equipped semi-auto firearm remains just that, a semi-auto. Legal definitions vary state-by-state, though, and binary triggers (as of the publish date of this review) are not legal in CA, CT, DC, FL, HI, IA, MD, NJ, RI, or WA. And, in Delaware, they can only be used in pistol platforms (you know, like a 10/22 pistol).

In the off chance that you pull the trigger in binary mode and fire that shot, but do not want the second shot to fire upon trigger release, moving the safety lever off of the binary setting will disable the fire-on-release function.

That said, I’ll admit that I’ve been fairly “anti” on the whole binary trigger thing since Franklin Armory first invented it. Without a doubt it’s very smart. Without a doubt it’s lots of fun. But I have safety concerns after personally witnessing multiple people unexpectedly popping off a round on trigger release.

Oddly enough, this seems to be a bigger issue with highly experienced shooters. They’re just so very used to a standard trigger function and typically have deeply ingrained shooting fundamentals such as a clean trigger pull follow-through that keeps it pinned back for longer. Then they forget and, when they eventually release the trigger, POP.

Without a doubt this is a training issue. The trigger functions exactly as it’s supposed to. But it’s a big reason I’ve felt like the only home for binary triggers is being used purely for fun plinking in a controlled, shooting range style environment.

Which is why the BFSIII 22-C1 for the Ruger 10/22 makes so much sense! The 10/22 is the ultimate fun-day-on-the-range plinking gun. Controllable, fun, safe, and firing the oh-so-very affordable .22 LR round, the ability to empty mags at twice the normal speed is a guaranteed smile maker.

It works, too. I ripped through magazines at lightning speed and smiled and giggled the whole way through. With the .22 LR RF/22 it shoots so completely soft and flat that keeping it on target despite the absurdly high rate of fire was a total non-issue.

Furthermore, the trigger is quite good. Whether in semi-auto or binary mode, there is zero takeup and nearly no creep at all. The 22-C1 has a crisp break in the 4-lb range. In standard semi-auto mode it also has a pronounced reset without much overtravel or total travel.

I’d hesitate to call it a “match grade” trigger only because of the pull weight falling more in the typical range rather than the target-style lightweight range. The 22-C1 is a very good trigger any way you cut it, though, and it just happens to have an extremely fun little trick up its sleeve, too.

Thousands of happy customers are enjoying Franklin Armory Binary Firing Systems in their ARs, HKs, ACRs, AKs, and other firearms, it just hasn’t been my cup of tea. This one, though? Yeah, I can get behind the BSFIII 22-C1. I think, if there ever were one, the 10/22 is the perfect firearm for this setup. These triggers aren’t cheap, but on a 10/22 the smiles-per-dollar factor here is extremely strong. Just be safe with it.

Specifications: Franklin Armory BFSIII 22-C1 Binary Firing System

Fit: most 10/22-compatible firearms
Function: 3-position selector with safe, semi, and binary firing modes
MSRP: $299.99 ($269.99 at Brownells)

Ratings (out of five stars):

Fun Factor  * * * * *
I mean, short of mortgaging your home to go the registered machine gun route, shooting the 22-C1 on binary mode is an absolute blast and just might be good for more fun than you’ve had on the range in years.

Reliability  * * * *
It’s possible to outrun or short stroke the trigger trying to be extra super secret probation fast with it. More the shooter’s fault than the trigger’s, of course, but it isn’t foolproof and takes some practice to optimize speed without occasionally missing the fire-on-release round. Even if you do that, though, you won’t induce a stoppage. The hammer spring is plenty strong to reliably ignite any rimfire ammo and the build and finish quality is high.

Overall  * * * *
Look, the Franklin Armory BFSIII 22-C1 ain’t cheap. Heck, it’s more than a lot of basic, complete 10/22 rifles. If this thing were similarly priced to other 10/22 triggers (to be clear, I’m not saying it should be) it’d be an easy five stars. A no-brainer. At the premium price I have a hard time going “full send” on a five-star rating, but Lord knows the 22-C1 is an absolute hoot to shoot and it’s reliable and well-made to boot. Lame old Safety Sally me is on board with a binary trigger in a 10/22. It’s okay, yes, I’ve come around. Just, you know, don’t forget what binary mode means and stay safe out there folks.

comments

  1. avatar tsbhoa.p.jr says:

    these are neat. i probably shouldn’t sneak one into my kid’s charger though.

    1. avatar Geoff "Guns. LOTS of guns..." PR says:

      Legal in Illinois, but not Florida? WTAF?

      1. avatar PK says:

        Binaries and bumpstocks were banned in FL as part of the Republican gun control push. Bumpstocks are federally illegal now, binary triggers aren’t.

        It’s a mess.

        1. avatar TheBSonTTAG says:

          But everyone here tells me Republicans are pro gun? How can this be? Wait until the bumpstock ban renders all semi autos machine guns. Things we have to look forward to in Trumps second term.

        2. avatar Geoff "Guns. LOTS of guns..." PR says:

          “Binaries and bumpstocks were banned in FL as part of the Republican gun control push.”

          I’m fully aware of the shit-show down here…

        3. avatar Chris T in KY says:

          Don’t worry the “gun Community” will always make sure that the rich will have access to machine guns. But no, low cost, rapid fire weapons for the regular people.

          “They report that he has an unbelievable collection of Class 3 firearms including M16s, belt fed machine guns and so many firearms it’s unbelievable.”

          https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/nra-lobbyist-marion-hammer-gets-the-proverbial-knives-out-for-miguel-fernandez/

        4. avatar Someone says:

          Dear BS. Everyone? You may have misunderstood.
          Some Republicans are pro gun rights, some are as long as they think it serves their carrier and some are anti. As opposed to Democrats. What we said is that Democrats are a bunch of shitty dirty gun grabbers and they are not shy about it either. It’s right there in their platform.
          With Republicans in power we may not gain much and maybe even lose some. With Democrats we are guaranteed that gun grabbing shitstorm they promised us repeatedly.

      2. avatar RINO Rick Scott sucks donkey nuts says:

        Thank RINO Rick Scott and his senate bid for the FL gun control cluster. Being an idiot politician, he thought ramming gun control down our throats would be good for his Senate campaign. A$$hat. Hoping someone primaries him out of there. The only reason I held my nose and voted for him was because of confirming conservative judges in the Senate. Otherwise, he can FOAD.

    2. avatar Leigh says:

      Definitely something you need to know is installed. And proper usage.

  2. avatar Geoff "Guns. LOTS of guns..." PR says:

    Felony territory in Florida…

    1. avatar Leigh says:

      Can have exploding targets and suppressors but not binary triggers. Hmmmmm
      If I had the cash I could have a full auto.
      But a binary trigger?? No go.
      Huh. Go figure.
      So much for no infringement. Different states…different rules.

      1. avatar binder says:

        Full auto doesn’t shoot when you RELEASE the trigger.

  3. avatar Leigh says:

    At least I can have suppressors in Florida.
    But this is pretty neat. Kinda wish I could get one.

    1. avatar Geoff "Guns. LOTS of guns..." PR says:

      I’d like both, but if I had to choose, I’d rather have suppressors and select-fire be legal.

      Oh, and people don’t shit on the streets down here.

      (Yet)…

      1. avatar Leigh says:

        Agreed.

  4. avatar Andrew Lias says:

    It’s cool to know that the safety prevents the second firing. I was really wondering on what you’d do with one of these if you were half way there and needed to let go of the trigger.

    Definitely not something for me, although I think it’d be a fun toy it just seems like an oopsie waiting to happen.

    1. avatar Geoff "Guns. LOTS of guns..." PR says:

      I’d have one if I could for my upcoming .300 blk build, but, noooooooooooooooo!

      Where legal, it would be a low-hassle way to have 2-round burst capability…

      1. avatar Someone says:

        Not guaranteed to work, but I had exactly the same effect when my drop in trigger set screws were not tight.

  5. avatar arc says:

    Is it possible to have a trigger have several stages, each stage firing a cartridge? A normal trigger is one shot per pull, and binary is one shot per pull and release, essentially half of a full manipulation. So why can’t we have a trigger that fires one round per step in the trigger?

    It would be a bit of engineering but I would like to see a trigger that can fire one bullet per “step” of the pull. Kind of like how a really nice two stage trigger feels, the user wouldn’t notice the steps too much and it would behave similar to a three round burst while being separate manipulations of the trigger.

    Pull 1/3rd of the way, fire one round, 2/3rds step, second round, full depression, third around, although in practice the user probably couldn’t control each step. Each phase of the trigger is its own unique manipulation.

    1. avatar PK says:

      No. That counts as a MG because a single straight back pull in your scenario would fire a 3rd burst with one action.

      It doesn’t have to make sense, but that’s what the tech branch says.

  6. avatar Greta van sustren says:

    I would love to have a couple of these….. too bad they are priced about 3 times higher than what they’re worth….
    Almost $400???? That’s insane….

    1. avatar Greta van sustren says:

      Im referring to the models for AR15/AK47… Even this one at $300 is more than the 10/22 costs…..
      These people need to LOWER THE PRICE!

      1. avatar PK says:

        “These people need to LOWER THE PRICE!”

        Of their unique, patented invention for which the demand generally outstrips the supply.

        Why in the world would they possibly lower the price? It’s obviously what the market will happily bear.

    2. avatar Mike V says:

      They had them for 299 on their website earlier today.

  7. avatar enuf says:

    Difficult to spend more money on a trigger than I did on both of the 10/22’s I’ve bought combined.

    But, yeah, could be fun.

    1. avatar Mike V says:

      LOL, it was incredibly easy for me…

  8. avatar Chris T in KY says:

    “That said, I’ll admit that I’ve been fairly “anti” on the whole binary trigger thing since Franklin Armory first invented it. Without a doubt it’s very smart. Without a doubt it’s lots of fun. But I have safety concerns after personally witnessing multiple people unexpectedly popping off a round on trigger release.”

    Sounds like these world class professional shooters need to train with a new piece of equipment. Just like everyone else does.

    1. avatar TheBSonTTAG says:

      Don’t worry, your hero Trump will ban them in his second term along with every semi auto.

      1. avatar Chris T in KY says:

        See my comments below. The “gun Community” has never been a supporter of innovation in firearms technology.

        1. avatar Texican says:

          I think the gun community has been supportive of innovation in firearms technology. The problem is arbitrary laws that hinder that innovation. We would’ve had SBRs much sooner, better silencers, and cooler machine guns invented by guys in their garage if not for the NFA, the GCA and the Hughes Amendment. And they would’ve worked better and the transition from revolvers to semi-autos would’ve happened sooner. I could go on and on. Yes, there are FUDDs but they would have been passed by sooner as the technology changed at a more rapid pace.

        2. avatar Chris T in KY says:

          to Texican
          fyi
          It was private commercial suppressors groups that traveled across the country and got over 30 states to legalize suppressors. Something from 1918(?).
          The NRA was not part of that support.

        3. avatar Jeremy S. says:

          Suppressors were completely legal and unregulated in any way until 1934. There was no legalization effort made or required in 1918 🤷‍♂️

    2. avatar Jeremy S. says:

      @Chris in KY: Yeah, I mean, literally the next thing I said in the review is “Without a doubt this is a training issue.” Doesn’t change the fact that it’s a huge deviation from the norm and I believe it presents safety issues and requires careful attention and familiarization.

      1. avatar binder says:

        Oh, come on, a dead mans switch on a firearm is a fantastic idea.

  9. avatar Roger J says:

    My American 180 fires 165 rounds in 7 seconds. A rate of 1340 rpm.

    1. avatar enuf says:

      Just watched a “Forgotten Weapons” piece about the AM-180 on YouTube yesterday. That thing looks like a heck of a lot of fun. In fact I recall a TV news report about it, local police were demonsrtating what it could do, back when it was a new thing. I remember seeing it chew thru cinder blocks and bricks and being very impressed with what a whole bunch of the same bullets my 10/22 fired could do.

      Naturally, the hoplophobes decided they were immoral and prone to encouraging bad behaviors.

      Darn it.

      1. avatar binder says:

        You should ask “Forgotten Weapons” what they thing of the binary triggers. And they are not anti at all (I will give you a hint, its not good, something about a dead mans switch.)

    2. avatar Hankus says:

      Unfortunately it takes a WHOLE LOT longer to load that drum. That seems to take forever. Sigh. The firing rate is so high that it takes practice to get down to a 3-round burst. I know, why would you want to do that?

  10. avatar Montana Actual says:

    It would be nice to see reviews of AR parts, instead of the constant 10/22 parts. Who is modding this stuff, And why?

    1. avatar Jeff the Griz says:

      Can’t be sure if you’re serious.

      1. avatar Montana Actual says:

        lol yea I’m serious. I just don’t get it. ‘I’m just not one of those “Imagine carrying an AK and then dying by someone hitting you in the head with a 22”. I mean, it’s a great weapon and I am sure there could be a time for it to shine in today’s urban warfare (in America), but I’d just rather not use one. I am genuinely asking what’s up and why. Also, if you should feel so inclined to gift me one, I would not complain.

  11. avatar Tt78 says:

    For the price, just buy a second 10/22 and dual wield

  12. avatar Chris T in KY says:

    I have personally seen a swedish machine gun on sale at my local gun store for $8000. So at $175 for a bump stock and $1600 for a good quality AR-15 (5.56mm), seems like a very good deal. To put a rapid fire weapon into the hands of the average person. Using military grade ammo. But the “gun community” was not a supporter. Go back and look at the negative comments on TTAG. If you doubt me.

    Now we are down to the 22 caliber rapid fire weapon for the average person. That is not bad for less than $600. Compared to $45,000 for a transferable thompson submachine gun. However the .22 is a big step down from a 5.56mm.

    There should be “machine guns for the poor”. Or is the 2A just for rich people?
    btw
    The WW2 Sten Gun from the UK cost only $10 a piece. I wonder if the “gun community” really does support innovation in firearms technology???

    “Marion Hammer: NRA Never Wanted Legal Machine Guns, Bump Fire Stocks”

    https://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2017/10/luis-valdes/marion-hammer-nra-never-wanted-legal-machine-guns-bump-fire-stocks/

    Now having said all that I’m ordering one for my ruger 10/22 today. The 2A is not about hunting. And it’s not about Three Gun either.
    The “blue flue” is in its 5th day in Atlanta Ga. And the seattle police department is still on “stand down” orders from the democrat party city government.

    1. avatar binder says:

      That tag link was a week after someone managed to kill 58 people and wounded another 413 utilizing bump-stocks. No one cares util you start racking up triple digit casualties and showing the next guy how to hit 4 digits.

      1. avatar Chris T in KY says:

        By any measure the Vegas shooter was a very rich man. As I said before. The rich, criminal or law abiding, will always be able to afford a machine gun. Or several of them.
        Making rapid fire guns expensive, didn’t stop a rich evil mad man, from murdering people with those guns.

  13. avatar Green Mtn. Boy says:

    Looks like Fun,now what is needed is a belt feed version and bricks of ammunition in belt form.

    1. avatar enuf says:

      A belt fed Ruger 10/22 conversion has been done by more than one very creative gunsmith. I know there’s video of one made up to look like a Browning M2, among other creations.

      Fun stuff for people with time, money and talent to GIT ‘ER DONE!!!! 🙂

    2. avatar Montana Actual says:

      Sounds cool, but I’d rather invest time, money and metal into a 5.56/7.62 variant… or bigger.

  14. avatar Complete Disapproval says:

    “…the BFSIII 22-C1 for the Ruger 10/22 makes so much sense! ”
    NOPE!

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