Chad Wainscott, 50, was killed while visiting a local gun shop when a gun being handled by another customer went off, striking him. Facebook Image.
Previous Post
Next Post

Chad Wainscott, a 50-year-old farmer and grandfather from Worthville, Kentucky, was fatally shot at a local gun store after a fellow customer accidentally discharged a firearm. The tragic incident, which occurred June 29, took place at Humphrey Double H Farms Enterprises Inc., according to a Kentucky State Police (KSP) news release. It was also 100 percent avoidable had standard firearms safety procedures been followed.

The preliminary investigation by KSP revealed that another customer was handling a firearm for sale when a single round discharged, striking Wainscott, who was inside the store. Despite immediate life-saving efforts by other patrons and emergency medical services (EMS), Wainscott later succumbed to his injuries at the local hospital.

Humphrey Double H Farms Enterprises was the site of the fatal accidental discharge. Facebook Image.

Wainscott was a beloved member of the Wheatley and Carrollton communities, known for his warm smile and infectious personality, according to various news and social media reports.

“When you seen Chad, you seen a smile,” Ernest Welch, owner of Welch’s Riverside Restaurant in Carrollton, told WLKY news. Welch fondly remembered Wainscott and his father as frequent customers who often spoke about their love for farming.

Police do not suspect foul play in the shooting, and the individual who discharged the firearm is cooperating fully with investigators. However, multiple safety rules that even a beginning shooter should be able to follow were clearly ignored by both the store and the customer handling the gun. On the store’s part, firearms for sale and being handled by customers should never have live ammunition in it and before handing the gun to a customer should be checked while pointed in a safe direction to make sure the chamber is clear and handed to the customer with the chamber open. When handed a firearm, the first thing anyone should do—even in a store—is again, check to ensure the gun is clear by opening the chamber while the gun is pointed in a safe direction. And even after doing so, even in a store or at a gun show or even at a trade show, at no time, should a firearm be pointed in a direction toward another person or in any unsafe direction.

“Based on statements and evidence collected, no charges are pending at this time,” KSP confirmed, though the investigation is ongoing to determine why the gun was loaded and the precise circumstances of the incident.

According to his obituary, Wainscott, also known affectionately as “Little Chigger,” was a dedicated family man who enjoyed working on the farm with his father in recent years. His obituary highlighted his love for the outdoors and various hobbies, including hunting, collecting guns and photographing sunsets. He was also a devoted member of Dallasburg Baptist Church in Wheatley.

Wainscott was an avid hunter who enjoyed sharing the outdoors with others. Facebook Image.

Wainscott’s unexpected and senseless death has left a profound impact on the community.

“He was one of the good ones,” a family member told the Daily Mail, expressing the deep sense of loss felt by all who knew him.

The tragedy is a stark reminder to all gun enthusiasts to always follow gun safety protocols any time and any where they are handling firearms, even in a gun store where we often assume the guns are unloaded. While they should always be unloaded in this environment, they still need to be handled as if they are not.

Previous Post
Next Post

46 COMMENTS

      • The first and #1 safety rule.
        Always assume all guns are loaded. That is how I was taught in the military. Perhaps those with 3 or 5 gun safes, and didn’t serve, didn’t learn this???

        I’m not saying the military doesn’t have NDs. But having one does open the possibility to Article 15 action. Civilians who have many are not prosecuted.

        So the store worker handed a gun to a customer. And didn’t clear the weapon first???

        All the local mom and pop gun stores I go to, every time the employee clears the gun. Before handing it to customer.

        The chain stores all use trigger locks. They never clear the guns.

    • Well, when you are out in the middle of nowhere, common gun sense isn’t always sensible. After all, the store apparently is attached to a farm equipment operation according to the name.

      • Clearly the gunshop failed. Sometimes ” good Christian folk” forgive & forget. But this is clearly extreme negligence. SUE🙄

    • … speaking of Alec ” world’s formost firearms expert ” Baldwin, the case willnow proceed with the jury to be instructed that he should be treated just like anyone else on the set, and ignore that he was the PRODUCER / DIRECTOR … Shit don’t stink for Hollywierd “Stars” evidently, unlike us common plebes

      • It’s my understanding that he (Alex) went on the “cheap” when it came to the production of this picture, cutting corners, as it was his, or part of his cash that was put up front for the making of this film. Please correct me if i’m mistaken. My wife’s first question to me, “why the hell didn’t he check the firearm, even though it was handed to him by the firearm’s “expert”, before pointing it an individual”?

  1. I get real squeamish about where the muzzle is pointed in a gun store’s show room. This is exactly why. I don’t care that they think they’ve been unloaded, etc. It also blows my mind how many customers are flippant about it too. I go out of my way to make sure I’m not pointing anything I’m looking at at anyone.

    I also don’t take for granted that an RSO knows anything either, considering I’ve had one check my rifle while lecturing me on saftey while pointing it at another RSO’s junk. At a range where an RSO got killed.

  2. Senseless tragedy…What part of keeping a firearm pointed in a safe direction is so f-ing hard to master? I cannot count the times I have seen the rifling in barrels of firearms pointed in my direction by some dumbfuk at a store counter, gun show, etc. Then there’s the dumbfuks who bring a loaded firearm in for repairs, etc.

    Note: If you are a Do It For Me Kind of person whose skills limit you to waiting for the repairman to show up to fix things then firearms are way down on your list. Do not touch a firearm until you are instructed to do so by a qualified firearms instructor.

  3. This is another Alec Baldwin moment with the same results. It is the responsibility of the person holding the firearm to be sure of it’s ability to discharge. Even if it has just been checked. The 4 Rules of firearm safety were designed for a reason. This is a violation of 1,2, and 3. Had they been properly followed number 4 would have been rendered irrelevant.

  4. I was pistol shopping at a local gun store. Not one, but two employees assisting me (first one went to help a customer that had asked for him) removed guns from display cases and placed them on the counter WITHOUT clearing them (three guns total). I’m a beginner shooter but even I knew that was wrong. The first thing I did was clear each pistol as I picked them up.
    I was also surprised after I handled the first one I asked to see, the employee didn’t place it back into the display case before removing the second I asked to see. At least with other high dollar merchandise, stores typically don’t want more than one item out of the case at a time.

  5. More than once I have had to grab a firearm being aimed at me or somebody else while at a gun counter.

  6. “Negligent Discharge by Gun Shop Customer Leaves One Man Dead.” There. I fixed the headline for you.

  7. At least two levels of fail here. First the store employee not checking the gun and then the customer not checking the gun. And then more breaches of the 4 rules.

    Don’t assume as it makes an @$$ out of you and me.

    • I’m okay with being made an ass of, as long as everyone is still alive for the responsible person to blush about it… dead men don’t embarrass easily.

  8. Someone pulled an Alec Baldwin. Live rounds seem to materialize in places they should not be.

    If only every child were trained in basic gun handling and safety procedures from the very start this would never happen.

    Blame this one on the idiotic NRA “don’t touch call an adult” bozo instructional theory instead of drilling kids on solid safety firearms handling procedures from the moment they have enough strength to hold a firearm.

  9. Either check that the weapon is clear or point it at the clerk who handed it to you when you test the trigger.

    Please and thank you.

  10. RIP to the deceased and I pray for healing for hos loved ones. I am very curious about the circumstances of how a live round ended up in a gun for sale. it seems very Alex Baldwin Rust like just from what the article says.

    • wild guess that it was a consignment gun. one round left in the magazine. customer brings gun to shop, racks slide back with magazine in, shows empty chamber. some conversation ensures. distractions. Clerk takes gun and closes the slide. clerk removes now empty magazine. gets distracted by something further. gun moves into inventory with one round now chambered.

  11. top picture caption needs a correction. currently reads: “Chad Wainscott, 50, was killed while visiting a local gun shop when a gun being handled by another customer went off, striking him.”

    guns don’t just “go off”

    should instead say something like:

    “Chad Wainscott, 50, was killed while visiting a local gun shop when a another customer negligently fired an inexpliciablity loaded display gun and fatally shot Wainscott.”

  12. Accidents are almost always caused by negligence on someone’s part. Charges should be filed on either the clerk, or the customer who fired the weapon, or both. There are no free rides when a person is “accidentally” killed.

  13. A sad accident! May he just wanted to buy a gunshot for hunting. As I once did it. A question confused me for a long time. Rifle scope or dot sight, which one is more suitable for AR15 to hunt?I read an article about ar15 scopes. But I am still confused.
    https://www.cvlife.com/blogs/news/red-dot-sights-vs-rifle-scope-what-s-the-best-for-ar-16
    If the scope is better, how about this kind of LPVO scope? I really want to buy a scope.
    https://www.cvlife.com/products/cvlife-1-6×24-lpvo-scope-with-cantilever-mount

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here