SHOT Show: Military Madness with Geissele, H&K, and Barrett,

Some of the coolest and most influential guns made are those that serving the members of our military. Our warfighters get some of the best gear made by man and the ones in this article can certainly meet that standard. The rifle above has a version of the USASOC improved upper receiver group that is currently going into service.

From the Geissele Automatics site:

For more than 50 years the famed silhouette of the M16/M4 has only had one major and several minor changes. Barrel lengths and buttstocks have changed, but more or less the evolution of America’s right arm has proceeded apace with each generation of warrior making her their own. In that time, the sight of the M16/M4 in the competent grasp of young Americans has meant hope to countless millions of people around the globe.

With the advent of the USASOC URGI, that quintessentially American silhouette has changed forever. The Geissele Super Modular Rail MK 16 handguard, hammer forged barrel, and mid-length gas system work in concert for a package that delivers measurable increases in hit probability. Designed to take the full rigors of the new M855A1 (AB57) ammunition, the USASOC URGI also takes full advantage of its capabilities. Once the USASOC URGI is installed on an existing system, it essentially makes for a brand new weapon. The USASOC URGI is a near-clone upper receiver group currently going into service with USASOC.

It should be noted that there are a few variations of the USASOC upper that vary based on how close to the original they are. The ‘near-clone’ has a few features that make it cosmetically and functionally identical to the authentic version, but the parts aren’t necessarily 1:1 identical to the military versions.

There is a slightly more costly clone version that is exactly the same as the real deal URGI. Retail varies depending on options at $979.00-$1499.00.

Josh Wayner for TTAG

Barrett is a name that conveys power, American manufacturing excellence, and constant improvement. The rifle pictured is Barrett’s MRAD as submitted to the USSOCOM ASR competition and is chambered in 300 Norma Magnum, but can be easily switched into a number of chamber options.

The MRAD is a great-shooting rifle in my experience and I’d love to try it out in a couple of the ASR chamberings.

Josh Wayner for TTAG

New for this year is Barrett’s REC10 rifle. This is a direct impingement semiautomatic chambered in .308 Win. The rifle recently won a military contract, but is expected on civilian shelves later this year.

I got an up-close look at the gun and can say that I’m quite impressed by what Barrett was able to pull off considering how saturated the AR market is.

Josh Wayner for TTAG

It wouldn’t be a Barrett stop without looking at the ever-popular .50 BMG bad boys. The M107 and M82 series rifles are some of biggest, coolest, and most visually distinguishable rifles made today. Check out how big the suppressor is here compared to a cell phone. While it looks gigantic here, it was even more impressive in person.

Josh Wayner for TTAG

Josh Wayner for TTAG

My stop at the H&K booth was again full of interesting military rifles. The M27 IAR rifle is currently in service with the United States Marines.

Josh Wayner for TTAG

Josh Wayner for TTAG

The new(ish) M110A1 CSASS chambered in 7.62x51mm was also present. Note the wall full of variants of H&K weapons in past or current service worldwide.

Many of these guns aren’t available for civilian purchase, even though most would sell extremely well.

Josh Wayner for TTAG

Also check out the 40mm GMG automatic launcher.

Josh Wayner for TTAG

 

comments

  1. avatar Mystickal says:

    I don’t get what’s so “improved” about the USASOC URGI that makes it worth $979.00-$1499.00 – I can’t see many differences from any other 14.7 mid length 5.56 upper.

    Can someone clue me in?

    1. avatar L says:

      The clue is it’s a ripoff.

      1. avatar Steve says:

        Considering any upper you build with Colt parts, premium barrel, and a brand-name rail system will be $1000, I don’t really see it as a ripoff.

        1. avatar L says:

          Sounds like more ripoffs. There is zero reason to pay more than $1000 for half of an AR when you can have a really good FULL AR setup… upper, lower AND accessories… for that much.

        2. avatar arc says:

          Yep, manufacturing techniques, coatings, materials, tolerance, resale value, it comes with a price. Its the question of: Do you want to pay once, up front, or pay every time you use it?

      2. avatar ai338 says:

        From companies that make hobby grade stuff, sure. Not from companies thst make quality used by professionals.

        1. avatar Mystical says:

          I dunno – you can get a BCM CHF 14.5″ middy for less than $700 – they’re pretty top notch.

          I have no problem paying for a quality product – but I’m not going to throw money at something without knowing what I’m paying extra for. Regardless, while there’s certainly differences between budget and boutique uppers, there are not enough differences to say that “it essentially makes for a brand new weapon.”

          Certainly Geissele makes some great stuff, and with their prices you can tell they’re proud of what they make – but that’s a bold claim, and I couldn’t find any information about how that particular upper is any better than any of the other quality mid-length uppers out there.

      3. avatar DapperGunsmith says:

        SMH… here we go again… Too much for you so it must be a ripoff…

        1. avatar Rob says:

          The poors are at it again

        2. avatar L says:

          So you enjoy overpaying for everything? Is it for self-validation? You may as well throw money in the shredder.

        3. avatar Rob says:

          Good products usually cost more. Your Anderson, or PSA rifle, is not in any way equal to higher end AR15s. Not only are fit and finish markedly better on most higher end stuff, which helps add to the cost; but the company will be replacing equipment at a much faster pace in order to keep the parts more in spec, which also adds to the cost. Quality costs money.

        4. avatar L says:

          Rob you are absolutely correct: good products cost more. But that doesn’t mean if something costs more then it must be a good product. I’m failing to see what this upper offers that makes it worth $1000+.

        5. avatar Rob says:

          The DD barrel has an MSRP of 359.00, while the MK18 Geissele Super Modular Rail forend has an MSRP of 375.00.
          They’re very well made quality parts, that, while expensive will likely outlast the cheaper competetion for some time.
          Is it worth it to you? Maybe not. Me? Not really.
          Someone who uses their rifle for work, or serious competition? Yeah, probably.

        6. avatar arc says:

          When I still had money to toss around, I got an SSA-E trigger, not sure if its $250? $300? good, because I only know stock / USGI triggers and that was my first nice one, but Id buy it again if I had the coin.

    2. avatar Owen says:

      It’s expensive because the Gov has super deep pockets. Charge what the market will bear as it were.

      My gripe is that they are paying with other peoples money (yours and mine).

    3. avatar Felix says:

      Everyone is answering a question which wasn’t asked.

      The unanswered question is: What makes this so different as to justify calling it a radically new weapon?

  2. avatar Mark says:

    One thing we can count on in life is all the poor people who bitch about prices and then conclude with the “I’ll stick with my POS rifle that I built myself. It is just as good for half the cost.” Yes, everyone in the world is a better engineer than companies with actual engineers designing firearms. Try working some overtime or shutting the fuck up for once. If you hate the price nobody cares. Value is subjective and if the rifles are truly overpriced then the free markets will adapt. Just because you work at Taco Bell doesn’t mean a firearm is overpriced.

    1. avatar L says:

      Mark, the free market will for sure adapt. I don’t see this product even existing anymore three years from now. This market is flooded as it is and this is way too much for what it offers. If it will exist, it will be at a significantly lower price. Compare that to the triggers Geissele makes that they are still cranking out over a decade later. I have one in my AR. They make killer triggers and expanding your business to include more products is always a good move IF you can do it successfully. I can tell you right now though, this upper is going to go nowhere simply because they had themselves beat before they even set up their booth at SHOT Show, especially with this price tag. What will it offer me that a $700, $500, $400 or $300 upper won’t and is it worth the extra $300, $500, $600 or $700? I’m still waiting for an answer to that question.

  3. avatar DesertDave says:

    What it is worth to one person may not be worth it to another. I myself pride myself at getting great deals. For every $ I save I can spend on something else I want. I do not have limitless income. With that said I like nice stuff. I have a $500 Boker folding knife, I got for $250. I have an FNAR, really high quality item, but was I going to pay the $1900 retail for it? Heck NO! I waited around and got the deal I wanted brand new for $900. Is it worth $900, you bet! Likely that high priced stuff will sell for a lot less once the market sets the price.

    1. avatar tsbhoa.p.jr says:

      where is that 250dolla boker made? die fatherland, argentina or asia?

  4. Yeah, most NOT for sell to citizens….
    Wouldn’t want the peasents to have something like that, right…Some politcians would probably start to worry about some kind of term limits then….

  5. avatar Grant. says:

    Please, HK, please. Sell us some 416s and 417s for the civvy market. Pleeease. There’s not much I won’t do for real HK rifles.

    1. avatar Mark says:

      They already do: MR556A1 and MR762A1

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