John Correia (VIDEO): The 72-Hour Rule, Notoriety, and the Pittsburgh Murders

John Correia gave some stellar commentary on the Pittsburgh murders earlier this week including his reasons for following the 72-hour rule and why we should not name the killers in these cases. Watch the Active Self Protection video below:

comments

  1. avatar L says:

    What murders? Link?

    1. avatar ken says:

      Sorry Mr. Van Winkle, did you just wake from your nap?

    2. avatar Andy Cox says:

      Webster says, “the crime of deliberately killing a person”.
      Where the hell have you been L that you need a link?

      1. avatar L says:

        Murders happen everyday. What murders are we talking about?

        1. avatar MKV says:

          A string of sudden heart attacks with no explaination.

          Sorry I couldn’t resist

  2. avatar Dr. Michael S. Brown says:

    Is this the video you are looking for?

    1. avatar Kat Ainsworth says:

      Fixed. Sometimes the embed futzes around. Should be fine now.

  3. avatar GD says:

    I find these “I am a father husband….gun owner” and the # people silly.
    If you have kids you should be cautious taking part in any form of activism imo. I never feel the need to advertise my gun ownership and love for the 2A anywhere, not with a bumper sticker, a shirt, or on facecrook. It’s private. The fact you display yourself with the “hashtag culture” is not going to change a thing. Gun grabbers cannot care less that you’re a good husband, father, etc.

    1. avatar Warlocc says:

      Hiding in a bubble while they influence people around you that pass laws that turn you into a felon isn’t very smart, either.

      1. avatar Anner says:

        My father and I have debated this point. He’s more brash in his enthusiasm and support, I take the cautious road. I think the best way to spread factual information and positively influence others is through personal contact. It’s casual conversation when the subject arises. It’s inviting them out to shoot, discussing carry options, and not immediately slamming their incorrect “knowledge”. Interject facts and informed opinions over time, and allow them to reach a correct conclusion on their own.

        Broadcasting to strangers via bumper stickers or social media posts might reach a few folks, but I think it’s a shallow approach. Long term course corrections need personal interactions.

        The side effect of that approach is you know who you’re talking to. I’d never advertise my firearms collection to a lunatic leftist, because I’ll never realistically change their opinion anyways, but I’ll gradually broach it with someone closer to the fence. They’re not likely to use that information for harm, and it can help normalize all things 2A.

        1. avatar Kat Ainsworth says:

          I would not refer to social media use as “shallow.” Today it’s part of our jobs – mine and John’s – and is how we engage readers/viewers and spread information. John’s fantastic at it and does good work. As much as I do not exactly love social media I’ve come to accept it as part of my job. Technology really has changed things.

        2. avatar Anner says:

          Point taken, I over-generalized.

        3. avatar tdiinva says:

          Using the internet is essential and maybe Facebook in a limited set of circumstances but Twitter is shallow and worthless. You cannot express complex issues in 280 characters. Many careers have been terminated by a momentary lapse in judgement.

        4. avatar Geoff "Mess with the bull, get the horns" PR says:

          “I would not refer to social media use as “shallow.””

          I gotta agree with TD on that one, Kat.

          Maybe not completely, but the ‘Twit’ was been hijacked by the mob mentality, of all political flavors…

        5. avatar Kat Ainsworth says:

          Geoff…I will agree some people use it for shallow reasons for it isn’t across the board. Are there shallow nitwits? Oh yeah…but I can’t go naming them. But the user ultimately determines the nature of social media use.

        6. avatar Ansel Hazen says:

          But in this day and age, the conversation isn’t likely to start unless you have that III% sticker on the back window of your ride.

    2. avatar New Continental Army says:

      I honestly used to think this way as well but changed my tune due to the fact that we should not be forced to hide our guns in shame. I actually took inspiration from the gay rights movement in that manner. 2nd amendment rights are very important and we cannot be cowed into hiding in fear. The gun grabbers WANT us to feel that way. That guns are shameful and we should hide them. Or if anyone knows you have a gun they’ll kill you and steal your gun. Or Like youre the only one who own guns. It’s a huge part of gun control. They know that if guns are completely normalized they will flat out *lose* the war. That’s why open carry is such a successful political tactic. The only people who flip out are the people who want all guns banned anyway.

    3. Saying “I’m a father, mother, have children” never changes anyone’s mind. No one cares, except your friends and family. No one wants to see your grandchildren’s pictures either. We just smile and hope you’ll hurry-up. We might like to see pictures of your new puppy, that’s about it. It never changes anyone’s mind, politically.

  4. avatar cbd says:

    Pittsburgh is my home. The grief of this community is palpable. I will say that the police response was swift. The first cop on the scene ran straight to the synagogue and engaged the shooter who was coming out the door. He did not hesitate or wait for backup. He “ran to the gun fire” and took a bullet. The murderer is up on 44 charges over 30 of which are death penalty. I can only hope that justice is swift.

    1. avatar Pawl from Florida says:

      Do you know how well the wounded victims are doing ?

    2. avatar Rick the Bear says:

      I’m glad that the first LE on the scene did his job. I’m very pleased and I hope that all the wounded second responders recovery quickly and fully.

  5. avatar You must know how I feel! says:

    Have leftist bumper stickers, t-shirts and hashtags influenced you? Have they changed your opinion on matters, have they backfired and moved you further right, or have they had no affect at all?

    Well, same applies to 2A social persuasion.

    1. avatar Ansel Hazen says:

      @ youmustknowhowifeel

      They have indeed. I take note of every leftist lawn sign and bumper sticker and don’t associate with those people.

  6. avatar possum says:

    The 72 hour rule. Bury them before then, their easier to tote when their stiff but if you wait 72 hours in a hot sun they start bloating up and won’t fit in the hole you dug.

  7. avatar tdiinva says:

    I am not a big fan of ASP. Most of the posted videos are of little relevance to anybody who doesn’t hang out with gangbangers or has no reason to visit third world S-holes. However, this video is spot on. I have been beating the drum for larger guns forever. In church security discussions I have recommended people that people bring G19 at the minimum for the ressons Mr. Correa has stated. Your facility also needs a security plan that goes beyond armed security. And you need to make sure that your armed parrishioners to be on opposite sides of the nave to ensure that an armed assailant has to turn his back to at least one defender. And one more thing, if you aren’t willing to risk your life don’t volunteer.

  8. avatar Bob says:

    Arrrrgggh…more “right wing” crap. John should stick to talking about guns. There’s nothing right wing about white nationalists. One key measure of where one falls on the left-right political spectrum is the source of liberties: are they natural rights; or are they granted by man. On that measure, nazis and communists are both on the extreme left, along with their Jew hating dirtbag pals like this crazed shooter. Hitler was a left winger, believing in total government control of the economy and society, and all rights came from the government. Stop faking for that whole “white supremisists are right wing”. It’s a trap.

  9. avatar Whitesgaveyoueverything says:

    The moment he begs forgiveness from Colin Flaherty I’ll listen to him. Until then, this guy is dead to me.

  10. avatar Rick the Bear says:

    Sorry, there is no such thing as a “hate crime”, unless there is also a “love crime”.

    There is not hot without cold, no up without down, no heavy without light, etc..

    A crime is a crime. The dead aren’t more dead because the assailant hated Jews. They’re still dead.

    His most significant comment was about the delay in police response. I don’t blame PPD for a moment. They rolled as soon as the call came in. No department can have officers everywhere all of the time. Thus, people are their own “first responders”: everyone else is second.

    It was saddening to read the synagogue’s rabbi’s column this past spring pitching for gun control. I just don’t get why Jews don’t “get it”. There is a “multi-religion service” at my synagogue tonight. I have chosen not to go. There will be the same platitudes about “hate has no home here”, “we must stand together”, blah, blah, blah. Oh, and we’ll talking about security (again!) at our board meeting Sunday. Since they won’t post “gun-free” signs, I think that signs saying “closed” should be posted. What anti-Semite would waste time shooting in an empty synagogue! Clever as a fox! Meanwhile, we can secretly meet in VFW hall across the street. Who would suspect? Oy!

    /rant over\

    1. avatar New Continental Army says:

      I could think of some love crimes…

  11. avatar Wayne says:

    Who is Kat that is now posting?

    1. avatar Kat Ainsworth says:

      Man… where have you been?

      1. avatar Chris T from KY says:

        Under a rock perhaps?

  12. avatar Chris T from KY says:

    Just as a black person gets looks, good and bad, from strangers, wearing a MAGA hat, I get the same reaction as a black gun owner wearing an NRA hat or a T shirt that says “keep calm and carry guns”.

    I get many more positive comments than bad. I’ve worn the NRA hat since 2014. To me this is part of working for my civil rights. The general public is getting only one side of the gunrights commentary. I knew I would get some strange looks from people when I started. People say “I like your hat” a lot.

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