Preserving Public Safety, More De-Platforming, and Running on Gun Control — TTAG Daily Digest

3d printing control can't stop the signal

courtesy whyy.org

3D printing companies take action against 3D guns amid debatable public safety threat

“Public safety threat.” Uh huh. You keep trying to stop that signal, pal . . .

Lately, Barger has been extra vigilant about the kinds of things people are hoping to create here.

“Our staff is always monitoring. If we see anything that even looks like a gun, we’re going to stop the person,” he said.

Barger hasn’t had to do that yet, but he says the company makes its policy clear to new users: don’t even try.

“If you’re going to 3D print any parts of a gun, since people are coming in here and using our equipment to print, we then have a liability,” he said.

People who work in the 3D printing industry in Philadelphia and around the country are taking action against 3D-printed guns.

‘​Shopify’ Targets Gun Companies With Crippling Ban, CEO Quietly ‘Amends’ Free Speech Stance

They’re all for free speech as long as they happen to agree with it . . .

Shopify has reversed course on their commitment to free speech, effectively implementing a commercial de-platforming of gun companies on their site. Landing a gut-punch to free speech and the Second Amendment, the massive Canada-based commerce platform serving some 600,000-plus merchants abruptly shifted policy to include bans on dozens of guns and gun-related products, including DIY kits and gun blueprints.

Shopify revised their Acceptable Use Policy on Monday to include a sales embargo on certain semi-automatic firearms, unfinished lower receivers, unserialized firearms, magazines capable of accepting more than 10 rounds, and many more products (view the list, here).

In a press release to The Daily Wire, Florida-based gun manufacturer Spike’s Tactical said “the new rules will essentially shut down the sale of guns, gun parts and accessories over the internet by retailers who use Shopify.”

“This decision will have significant ramifications to our business and should concern every online retailer and Second Amendment supporter,” warned Spike’s Tactical GM Cole Leleux.

Police: Suspect shot, killed in southeast Las Vegas was stabbing woman with butcher knife

Caught red-handed. Literally . . .

Las Vegas Metropolitan police said the man shot and killed by a sergeant on Wednesday while he was stabbing a woman, was armed with an eight-inch butcher knife at the time of the shooting.

The department received multiple calls on Aug. 8 about a man trying to kill his wife, Assistant Sheriff Brett Zimmerman said in a press conference on Monday. Three officers and a sergeant were assigned to respond, including Sgt. Daniella Cino, who was first on scene at 5350 East Tropicana Avenue.

Police said the suspect, identified as William Fuller, was on top of a woman, attacking her. Cino ordered him multiple times to get off her.

Judge denies injunction request in Georgia campus carry lawsuit

Shadenfreudelicious . . .

A Fulton County judge has denied an injunction request by six Georgia professors to prohibit the state’s contentious campus carry law, which allows licensed gun owners to carry a firearm on some parts of public college campuses.

Superior Court Judge Kimberly Esmond Adams wrote in her ruling her decision had nothing to do with the merits of the complaint. Instead, she wrote, “because the State has not waived sovereign immunity, and, to the extent Plaintiffs claims could be sustained against Defendants in their individual capacities, official immunity would bar such claims.”

The ruling was filed Thursday.

Exclusive: Democrats funding spike in gun control ads this election cycle

Democrats heart gun control…and now they’re happy to run on that fact . . .

Candidates across the country and allied outside groups are seizing on the issue of guns in advertising this election cycle, but with a twist: More spots now promote gun control than oppose it.

That messaging represents a reversal from the last midterm cycle in 2014 and even 2016, when the combined total of pro-gun-rights spots in governors, House and Senate races eclipsed those touting restrictions on guns, according to a USA TODAY analysis of data from Kantar Media.

The shift follows a rash of mass shootings, including the killing of 17 students and staff members at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School six months ago Tuesday.

 

comments

  1. avatar How_Terrible says:

    “Shadenfreudelicious” just became one of my favorite words.

    Thanks, Dan!

  2. avatar New Continental Army says:

    I like how liberals are now at all out war with the first amendment as much as the second. I suppose it’s always been this way, but they’re just out in the open about it now.

    1. avatar CZJay says:

      Because they are winning enough to take off the disguise.

      1. avatar LarryinTX says:

        They sure think they are, anyway! They thought so in 1994, too, running proud on their wonderful AWB, and were completely surprised that they were CRUSHED in Nov. We shall see, this year, but we sure have not yet.

      2. avatar Phil Wilson says:

        And the fact that the few remaining liberals are being pushed out of the Democratic party, even being demonized. I personally know two liberal Democrats, and both are getting up there in years. No, the liberals are gone from the DNC, replaced by leftists.

    2. avatar KenW says:

      It’s not just Liberal Democrats going for it. We in Florida might be screwed if Graham or the thundering herd of rich people running as Democrats for governor make it. I view Gwen Graham as the Democrat most likely to be the choice against whoever makes it from the GOP side. And a high priority is her desire to go after guns.

      Or the Nation might be screwed if one of the Florida GOP folks running for Congress get in. According to this article in the local paper Julio Gonzalez seems to hate the NRA.
      http://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20180815/gonzalez-akins-attack-steube-in-televised-debate

      ” The latest attack, leveled by Gonzalez targeted Steube’s endorsement by the National Rifle Association.
      Gonzalez first picked at the failure of many of the pro-Second Amendment bills Steube filed to gain traction in the state Legislature, then Gonzalez questioned Steube’s character, in light of his endorsement by the NRA.
      It’s also interesting that the NRA would have picked him as somebody that they would endorse, when he’s had reports in the newspaper that shots had been fired in his home and that one time, when he called for the police for assistance, he actually stepped out with an AR-15, necessitating the sheriff’s department to … yell at him,” Gonzalez said.”

      Which of course has the local LEO’s saying they do not know WTF Julio is talking about.

      1. avatar CC says:

        There are about 9,000 federal and state legislators. With primaries and general elections about 40,000 running any given two years. 40,000.

        Yes this was an a55 who got an NRA endorsement and then went rogue. Not too hard to find outlier mistakes in endorsements etc. what counts is the general movement

        1. avatar KenW says:

          Steube and Gonzalez are not running for local or state they are running for Congress. So decisions or bills they introduce affect the nation not just Florida.

  3. avatar Alex Waits says:

    –“If you’re going to 3D print any parts of a gun, since people are coming in here and using our equipment to print, we then have a liability,” he said.–

    About as much “liability” Home Depot has for carrying all those materials to create pipe shotguns or a P.A. Luty.

    People are getting more retarded.
    Greatest technological age in the history of mankind, and ignorance still abounds.

    1. avatar CZJay says:

      It’s been said that technology actually makes people dumber and more incompetent.

      I heard that some kids can’t tell time because they use their phones for that. It’s like when calculators became common.

      1. avatar Alex Waits says:

        I get dependencies develop.. relying on cars, moving to digital rather than analog, farming methods, and increased use of “devices” etc.. and such will be the way of things, might not necessarily be a bad thing..

        What I am more referring to is the lack of a drive to think, to learn, to understand. People seem to no longer want to think, no longer want to understand. Just repeat the drivel and stand upon a faux moral superiority.

        The fire of independence is not what it once was.

        1. avatar LarryinTX says:

          I bet not one in 50 Americans can give a basic description of how a 4-stroke piston engine works. When I was in high school, I bet half the boys in my class could take apart a V-8 and put it back together before they graduated. Today, I’m not certain the average kids can do *anything* when they graduate high school.

      2. avatar Chris T in KY says:

        Talk to a math teacher. They will tel you the calculator which is allowed in school has made kids weaker in math skills.

        1. avatar Huntmaster says:

          Bullshit. Forcing kids to add, subtract, and divide page after page of numbers did more to sour really smart kids on math and technology than any other educational practice. Smart kid s just get bored with that. Even if you have a calculator you still need to know what it’s doing and have an idea what your answers are going to be. Calculators take the tediousness out of math.

        2. avatar Ingenero says:

          I agree (mostly) with Huntsman. People should have to learn math by hand well before they move to calculators to keep them from being a crutch, but as someone who actually crunches numbers for a living, I do think the tedium does get to be silly. We laud the Asian methods of teaching, but forcing kids to memorize too much by rote just bores them, and doesn’t necessarily make them better students – parental pressure and emphasis on education does.

          Same goes for tech. You can complain people can’t raise their own horses, grow their own grain, slaughter chickens, build farmhouses, etc. But what’s the point? We do such things better and faster. You show me a person complaining about technology who does their accounting by hand on paper they made lit by candles from their own beeswax…I’ll show you someone who either hires a lot of people or lives barely above subsistence. Life’s better this way. And if you think people of the past were smarter, you haven’t read enough. They were as stupid as we are, we just only remember the brightest of them and think they were normal rather than extraordinary.

        3. avatar CC says:

          Both higher math theory and elementary math and arithmetic exercise are not just about per se use of those skills, it is about exercise for the brain. Just as as kids who learn level five difficulty languages (eg chinese for a native English speaker or visa versa) do better in all subjects, so too do kids who are challenged and pushed on math.

          The problem we have in the US is a reticence, in fact in the modern PC US, a taboo against classifying and tracking/grouping kids by IQ and aptitude.

          We put 90-95 IQ kids in with 120 IQ kids and then make the metric for “success” of a school or teacher the least amount of “gap” in achievement/results. This means the impetus is to not challenge or encourage the 110-125’s, and to, as we see in multiple school scandals, encourage or facilitate cheating by the kids on the lower IQ rungs.

    2. avatar Hannibal says:

      She might have MORE civil liability now because she has advanced a policy of monitoring and policing what people are doing rather than simply renting out equipment.

  4. avatar CZJay says:

    In China she would have been screaming for 15 minutes as people walked by or stood around watching her get beat and stabbed. Next time this happens a resident should be armed and ready instead of waiting around for a cop.

  5. avatar Chris T in KY says:

    The Liberals never supported free speech. But they did support a porno magazine publisher wearing an american flag, as a diaper, in a court room. That is the only type of free speech to them.

  6. avatar pieslapper says:

    The left is all about tolerance… as long as you agree with them.

  7. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

    It’s a really simple answer. Switch from Shopify to a different platform. No matter what the product. It takes money out of their pocket.

    1. avatar Stereodude says:

      And when there’s no platform left to switch to you suggest they do what?

      1. avatar Ingenero says:

        Make one. Sounds dumb, and we should resist people removing gun sites, but there are tech-savvy people outside Silicon Valley who can do these things and want money. Keep the gov’t from banning it, and people will make a platform.

        1. avatar ollie says:

          The NRA should step up and provide a commerce site for shooting merchandise.
          It can’t be that hard to set up a system.
          In the meantime, Boycott Shopify merchants and let them know why.

        2. avatar Stereodude says:

          You make it sound so easy. What happens when no one when sell you a TLS/SSL certificate, no one will let you register your domain, no one will sell you hosting services, you can’t get credit card processing, nor insurance for you business because you’re involved with “gunz”?

        3. avatar Mister Fleas says:

          Got a few billion dollars to throw away?

        4. avatar CC says:

          The NRA should step up and provide a commerce site for shooting merchandise.

          Seriously — NO.

          This would pump a few hundred million more dollars into the gun control lobby for the sole purpose of suing the NRA. In the past 12 months the gun control lobby spend $11 million on a specific 501c3 (gunsdownamerica) whose only purpose was to attack NRA’s affinity, corporate relations and insurance affiliation. That was both unprecedented in attacking a membership association — and VERY successful.

          The gun control lobby would love nothing more than getting the credit card companies to prohibit even membership dues transactions to the NRA. And they sure as heck would love to find a way to sue and totally defund and destroy the NRA, taking all assets and income.

      2. avatar CZJay says:

        That’s what happens when you allow other people to do everything for you and you become dependent on them entirely.

        We already know that the internet/tech industry is on the left side of politics. Although people know this, they choose to support them on their rise to power (because Google is cool and Facebook is the place to be). Americans allow those international corporations to take tax dollars and work with the government. When these companies become too big to fail Americans want government to suppress the Frankenstein.

        How about we don’t support the legal entity known as the “corporation” and we don’t give out patents/IP like we do? Also, let’s not allow them to secretly spy and sell your data. And terms of service shouldn’t be so fluid and selectively enforced if it’s an actual legal agreement.

        Google is one of the worst companies in America yet people support them because it was/is the trendy thing to do. The once young generation used to say, “Yahoo is for old people. You should use Google because it’s way better.” These people even want Google to run their local ISP and DNS. GG, hipsters!

        I never had a Facebook account because I already knew they were spying and selling your data. That’s how they made their money. They also worked with the government to build those dossiers. Cambridge Analytica was simply using Facebook’s tools that were left open to the public on purpose… There was no way I was ever going to give a corporation — that is working with the governments of the world — my name, phone number, personal pictures, etc, just to use their trendy service.

        You ruin capitalism, then you blame capitalism.

    2. avatar TrueBornSonofLiberty says:

      Not so simple. As just one example, Spikes (in their comprehensive response) explained that in just the last few years, poured over $100,000 into building their Shopify website and that 90% of their entire gross income is generated on Shopify. All of this was based on the assurances from Shopify that Spikes business practices were protected on that platform. Spikes said they’ve generated millions of dollars of revenue based on those assurances, of which Shopify shares in a percentage of the profits. Spikes has now alerted those also effected throughout the gun community to contact them in an effort to mount a class action lawsuit. Fortunately the path forward to a decision doesn’t go through the ninth circuit. So again, not at all “simple”. And to dismiss it as such is myopic and plays into the filthy Liberal Terrorists™️ attempting to subvert the exercising of our Constitutional Rights.

      1. avatar Richard Wise says:

        “….Canada-based commerce platform….”

        I’m not sure what court that would go through but there is no 1st or second ammendment in Canada. And good luck compelling Canada in to compelling Shopify to go along with a successful lawsuit.

  8. avatar Dog of War says:

    3D printing companies take action against 3D guns amid debatable public safety threat

    I’ll high light how pathetic this company is when they say “It’s an older printer, but it’s still a $40,000 machine,”. First off, if they paid $40K for that printer they featured in the article then they need to fire whoever is doing their purchasing. Because that’s a really really basic printer. If they paid $40K for that machine, it’s either 20 years old or they’re flat out lying about how much it costs. Given that a modern polymer working 3D printer of that size can be had for anywhere from $400 to $3.5K. And if that’s not good enough for you, you can actually build the printer itself from a DIY kit!

    If nothing else, this entire moral panic about 3D printers and guns just really shows you how the MSM relies on the ignorance of the people they throw their propaganda at.

    1. avatar CC says:

      Exactly, what was a $40k printer 10-15 years ago is a $5k printer today.

      but the NPR station publishing this story doesn’t represent uniformed journalism, but PAID advocacy journalism. The NPR stations are participating in a funded program by Kendeda, one the leading gun control funding foundations in the US — and one which gives directly to NPR stations to write stories on gun control

  9. avatar Brad Hayes says:

    Devils advocate and disclaimer, I’ve never completed an 80% lower or 3D printed anything. It is my understanding that for an 80% lower to be legal I have to do all the work myself, without paying anyone for the use of their tools, expertise, shop space, whatever. If on wrong on that I stand humbly corrected. However, if that is true, how can I legally go into a shop that does 3D printing, pay them for the use of their machine and stay within the law. To be clear, I’m not saying I agree with any laws restricting firearms, but this seems to run afoul of the current laws as I understand them.

    1. avatar Hannibal says:

      You have to do it (can’t pay someone else to work the machines etc), but there’s nothing that stops you from renting the necessary tools.

      1. avatar Stereodude says:

        There seems to be some legal uncertainty about that. For example, you apparently can’t let someone else use your Ghost Gunner 2 CNC to finish their lower. From their FAQ:

        “Recent ATF determinations have signaled that allowing others use of your CNC equipment may itself constitute manufacturing, therefore Ghost Gunner advises GG owners to neither print firearms for other individuals, nor allow other individuals to use their Ghost Gunner to manufacture firearms without the advice of counsel. To assist you, we invite you to read our latest Ghost Gunner Guide.”

        Other people have reported similar things about jigs to finish 80% lowers. Like a group of five guys can’t all chip in and share a router jig to finish their 80% lower. It’s only legal for the person who actually bought it.

        IANAL, I don’t see how paying machine time for a 3D printed finished lower would be any different.

        1. avatar Mad Max says:

          The ATF does not currently have the authority to regulate machine tools (especially general purpose machine tools with multiple uses) because they are not alcohol, tobacco, firearms, or explosives and aren’t covered in the NFA, GCA, or any other law applicable to the ATF.

          I also doubt that the SCOTUS would uphold any expansion of the ATF’s regulatory authority in this area.

          I also don’t think any of the ATF’s proposed rulemaking in the bump stock area (as currently proposed) will withstand SCOTUS scrutiny.

          Hopefully, with Gorsuch, Kavanaugh, et. al., we are moving towards the end of the Chevron Deference and will have a SCOTUS that is more resistant to, and suspicious of, regulatory authority.

        2. avatar Joemoma says:

          I’m pretty sure that’s butt coverage, which with the way things are going I could see them getting sued friviously.

        3. avatar CZJay says:

          Far as I am aware, you must do the work yourself. As long as it’s only you doing the work you won’t need to serialize the gun and go through a FFL. If you start adding other people into the mix, you’re going to need a license.

          It’s one of those letter of the law situations. So it’s best to talk to a lawyer to figure out the details to keep you from doing one thing wrong and send yourself to prison. Trump’s administration said it won’t be your friend.

        4. avatar Stereodude says:

          Mad Max: How much of your money do you want to spend and how do you want to risk your freedom / livelihood fighting the Federal gov’t in court? The ATF may lack the authority and you might even win in court, but unless you’re independently wealth you’ll be broke when you’re done. Then, the ATF just tweaks their interpretation slightly to technically comply with the narrowly worded court ruling you won and can start the process over again.

          Unfortunately, the process is enough of a punishment to give them defacto authority.

        5. avatar LarryinTX says:

          I’m with Max. Last I heard, laws were made by Congress, not ATF. I don’t give a rat’s patootie what ATF has “interpreted” or whatever, They can come to me for the test case if they like, since I will not plead guilty to violating an ATF “interpretation”, either. If I had a GG I would lend it to whomever I believed would bring it back when promised. I might also rent it out, without even asking what it was to be used for. Just caving to government goons’ bullying is how we get into these messes, make them WORK for it! Most of the time, that only requires ignoring their rambling and interpreting, stop working so hard to discover why you cannot do something, just do it.

          Also, I propose we avoid all serializing questions in the future by going ahead and serializing homemade guns, all with the same serial number.

  10. avatar Mad Max says:

    Any publicly-traded corporation that censors, de-platforms, or otherwise restricts the use of their products or services for any legal purpose should be fined and/or have trading in their stock suspended.

    Publicly-traded corporations are owned by a wide cross-section of the public at-large; therefore, discrimination in any way by these companies can never represent the will of all of the owners. The only goal shared by all of the corporation’s owners is the goal of financial profit.

    These companies should not retain any Constitutional right that discriminates against any customer in any way.

    On the other hand, sole proprietors and closely-held corporations should fully retain all of the individual rights enumerated in the Constitution, including freedom of religion and association.

  11. avatar Dan in Detroit says:

    Democrats are proudly running on gun control this cycle?
    Not up here in Michigan, where most people outside of detroit either hunt or have hunters in the family…
    I thought it was just me that was being suspicious, but other people have mentioned to me that they also haven’t been hearing ANYTHING about gun control on dem’s commercials. Some haven’t even put the issue on their websites – I looked.
    And yet I don’t believe for a second that they don’t have a strong stance on the issue… just that they’re afraid to say it in a state that keeps going more and more pro-gun.

    1. avatar CC says:

      Less than 8% of gun owners are gun hunters ,and gun hunters are one of the easiest demographics to go FUD.

      Michigan Democrat Representatives have ALL been taking money from gun control lobby and have ALL been supporting more gun control:

      https://www.npr.org/2018/02/19/566731477/chart-how-have-your-members-of-congress-voted-on-gun-bills

      1. avatar LarryinTX says:

        I guess I’m in that 8%, as I am a gun owner and a gun hunter. I am currently hunting for a S&W Classic Model 19.

        1. avatar Phil Wilson says:

          Thanks for the grin.

  12. avatar Shire-man says:

    Having printed out a Liberator at no point during the process do any parts resemble a gun.
    Seems like I should finally grab a little crypto currency the way this is going.

  13. avatar CC says:

    Exclusive: Democrats funding spike in gun control ads this election cycle
    Democrats heart gun control…and now they’re happy to run on that fact . . .
    Candidates across the country and allied outside groups are seizing on the issue of guns in advertising this election cycle, but with a twist: More spots now promote gun control than oppose it.

    The entire reason for most gun control funding is to pump 501c3 tax deductible raised money into Democrat campaigns. The gun control lobby has fine tuned exactly how far they can go on that. Adds that support gun ocntorl without specifying legislation by bill number or candidates are not considered prohibited or limited political activity by the IRS for 501c3. Those are “educational efforts” which can be the main and indeed sole purpose of a “charity.”

    501c4 which is not tax deductible but non profit tax exempt, can do a lot concerning candidates and specific legislation. While not tax deductible like c3, are effectively opaque completely masking donors. Corporate donors with agendas other than gun control, can meet with candidates, the candidates know the money is being channeled to their candidacy as a shadow campaign, yet the public has no way of knowing who the donors to the c4 are. ie a pharmaceuticals or brokerage company that wants IOUs on legislation and access, if it gave directly to a candidate would be tracked on FEC website and voters and press would know the candidate was taking money form an industry sector. If the same company gives to a gun control groups c3 they get a huge write off and subtle support, and if they give to a gun control groups c4 they get no write off but get to hide their donation.

    this phenomena shows gun control lobby is much more sophisticated and why it can out-raise NRA 20:1, since NRA is stuck opposing specific legislation which c3 can’t do and which c4 can only do in a limited way

    We will see this inequality in money and power increase, not decrease.

  14. avatar Kap says:

    I would like each and every one of Anti 3D printer guns people to have to print one and shoot one in .44 Mag, just to prove their point, Plastic everything especially one hot out of the printer then confirm how deadly and easy it is!

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