The integrally-suppressed M&P 15-22 from Innovative Arms is just so dang quiet that I couldn’t resist posting the video even before the full review is ready. Stay tuned, though, as the write-up will go live later this week.

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26 Responses to Video: Innovative Arms Integrally-Suppressed S&W M&P 15-22

    • “But does it come in Muddy Girl?”

      Sheesh, these kids today want everything just handed to them. Next rainy day, just get the girl muddy yourself.

      (What you do *after* can be lots more fun than getting her muddy.)

      *Wink* 😉

    • It did it at other points in the video, too, even when I wasn’t shooting. In those cases I know for sure it was due to the wind and my camera trying to prevent wind buffeting. Can’t know for sure what was causing it at that one point during the talking+shooting part though. Maybe wind + gunshot pushed it over the edge.

  1. Can I send my M&P 15-22 upper and have that Barrel assembly and can put on? How much is this thing going to cost? It’s absolutely awesome.

      • Thank you very much for the information on price since you already have one what’s the can made out of I’m guessing aluminum since it’s 22 long rifle? Does it look like it’s built pretty well?

        • Check the link to their site in the text above. It’s a monolithic 17-4 precipitation hardened stainless steel core and an aluminum tube. You can take the core out and toss it in the ultrasonic, or clean it however you please as it’s a quality grade of stainless steel rather than aluminum.

    • Yeah I saw in the video that he was shooting high velocity 22 long rifle and it wasn’t cracking the sound barrier going supersonic. I wonder how much velocity is lost being internally suppressed usually you lose around 100 – 175 feet per second when you internally suppressed a rifle I wonder what that 22 long rifle is dropping at I hope in the review he shoots it over a crow no along with a stock 1522 and see what the difference in velocity is.

      • The barrel does port off a little bit of gas, but it doesn’t have to be much as it’s only 10″ long so high velocity ammo isn’t getting up to rifle speeds anyway. With the suppressor stuff it counts as 16.25″ total length so it isn’t an SBR, but the actual rifled barrel is just 10″. I’ll include chrony data for a few loads.

        BTW typically a suppressor adds velocity. The idea that they slow bullets down is mostly a Hollywood myth, but partially true due to old-school suppressors that used heavy wipes that touched the projectile. A modern can is basically like extra barrel length (but with a poor gas seal). The bullet has pressure behind it for longer, and usually picks up a couple percent higher velocity. Like, literally, 1% to 3% depending on caliber and barrel length. I’ve tested .22, 9mm, and 5.56 in various firearms suppressed and not and a 2% gain when suppressed was pretty consistent. None ever saw lower velocities.

  2. One would have expected that Jeremy S. would have explained that this rifle’s barrel is ported and that the manufacturer does not advise you to even use subsonic rounds. As far as I know all full power loads will in fact be slowed down to subsonic for your hearing pleasure.

    • Yeah if you want to go supersonic you can always use hyper velocity rounds I believe the Smith & Wesson M&P 15-22 is the only 22 long rifle on the market other than bolt action that says you can use hyper velocity rounds in it without a problem. You put some hypervelocity Stingers or Winchester Super X and that thing is going to be shooting right at probably high velocity maybe a little skosh more but either way I’m already hooked I want to buy one.

  3. I just took a coworker out shooting and let him try my 15-22 with a suppressor and sub rounds. He had a grin from ear to ear. The smith 15-22 is a pretty good rifle to suppress. Very reliable and very quiet. If I had an internal suppressor it would be even more fun. 22lr truly is a gateway drug for suppressors.

    • Smith & Wesson recalled the M&P 15-22 and replaced the recoil spring to a stronger one to make sure it goes all the way into battery when dirty to prevent out of battery discharges period problem fixed Appleseed can relax now. $0.10 spring fix the problem.

      • I’m surprised I’ve never seen this issue. Running my 15-22 suppressed most of the time it gets filthy. I’ve never had it fail to go into battery. If it malfunctions it has been not having the slide go far enough back to reset the trigger. Mechanical oddities and all I suppose.

        • I have one of the original first gen M&P 15-22 and it had the weaker spring in it very word color differences I can’t remember now I believe the blue powder coated spring is the new one and this problem was addressed by Smith & Wesson years ago so I’m not quite sure why Appleseed is just now Banning the rifle I’ve shot mind suppressed and unsuppressed UF thousands of rounds of that sheep Aguila Ammunition and everything else in between and never had one problem but Smith & Wesson did send me a more powerful recoil spring that I did put in just to make sure but it worse case scenario all you’re going to get is a ruptured case and possibly a little bit of fragmentation coming out the ejection Port it’s never going to be a catastrophic failure or an explosion of any type it’s a 22 long rifle give me a break.

  4. Likely to be used by opponents of the HPA to prove that suppressors make “assault weapons” nearly silent (.22LR, .223, whatever….)

  5. Why is this quieter than the new integrally-suppressed Ruger 10/22, which Ruger boasts is “only” 113.2 decibels (louder than a jackhammer, which is 110 decibels)? They both have similar designs, a 10″ barrel with 6.25″ integral suppressor making it 16.25″ long.
    Why is the Ruger integrally-suppressed 10/22 louder than a jackhammer?

    • 113 dB is crazy quiet for a suppressed, semi-auto firearm. That’s about what an AR-15 is good for just from hitting the bolt release (the volume level of the bolt slamming home). A really quiet, suppressed 9mm is usually around 122 dB. “Hearing safe” for impulse sounds like this is under 140 dB. The standard is not measuring at the shooter’s ear, but directly off to the side of the muzzle 1 meter away from it.

      I don’t know what this setup meters at, but I kind of doubt you could tell the difference between it and the integral Ruger without a meter. I’ve shot BB guns louder than this thing. Paintball guns are louder. I expect the Ruger is in that category, too.

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