Misstate Gun Company (courtesy yelp.com)

“In 36 states, there are no legal requirements for gun registration, no permit needed and no license necessary to purchase and own a firearm such as a rifle, shotgun, or handgun,” huffingtonpost.com reports. “Due to the lack of these regulations, as well as the ease with which many Americans can purchase guns online or at gun shows, most guns in the United States are not registered.” And that’s a problem because . . . guns! HuffPo’s article lists 36 states considered “The Easiest State to Buy a Gun” (list after the jump). Note: it’s bogus (e.g., no mention made of RI’s “blue card” requirement and seven-day waiting period). How long does it take — how much unconstitutional hassle must you endure — to buy a gun in your state?

desantis blue logo no back 4 small

1. Alabama

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 30.6 (6th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:24.5 (18th highest)

2. Alaska

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: No

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 22.6 (11th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:47.0 (the highest)

3. Arkansas

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 28.9 (8th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:31.6 (8th highest)

4. Colorado

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 17.4 (23rd highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:18.3 (20th lowest)

5. Delaware

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 5.6 (3rd lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:14.4 (15th lowest)

6. Florida

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 16.1 (24th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:14.7 (16th lowest)

7. Georgia

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 22.1 (13th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:17.4 (18th lowest)

8. Idaho

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 37.0 (5th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:32.5 (6th highest)

9. Indiana

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 20.0 (17th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:20.7 (23rd lowest)

10. Kansas

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: No

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 16.0 (24th lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:25.9 (16th highest)

11. Kentucky

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 18.7 (19th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:27.9 (10th highest)

12. Louisiana

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?:Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 22.8 (10th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:20.8 (24th lowest)

13. Maine

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: No

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 11.7 (13th lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:24.2 (19th highest)

14. Mississippi

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 10.7 (10th lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:26.7 (13th highest)

15. Missouri

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 12.5 (15th lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:35.3 (5th highest)

16. Montana

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 16.0 (25th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:42.2 (3rd highest)

17. Nevada

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 29.4 (7th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:22.8 (23rd highest)

18. New Hampshire

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 21.8 (14th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:31.9 (7th highest)

19. New Mexico

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 56.3 (2nd highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:26.5 (15th highest)

20. North Dakota

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 14.2 (19th lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:26.8 (12th highest)

21. Ohio

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 15.1 (20th lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:20.3 (22nd lowest)

22. Oklahoma

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 19.9 (18th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:27.1 (11th highest)

23. Oregon

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 15.7 (21st lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:23.1 (20th highest)

24. Pennsylvania

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 22.3 (12th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:21.2 (25th lowest)

25. Rhode Island

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 4.8 (2nd lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:21.8 (25th highest)

26. South Carolina

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 18.2 (21st highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:21.9 (24th highest)

27. South Dakota

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 18.7 (20th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:31.2 (9th highest)

28. Tennessee

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 16.0 (23rd lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:26.6 (14th highest)

29. Texas

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 20.3 (16th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:19.4 (21st lowest)

30. Utah

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 37.9 (4th highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:17.9 (19th lowest)

31. Vermont

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: No

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 8.3 (8th lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:25.9 (17th highest)

32. Virginia

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 41.5 (3rd highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:23.0 (21st highest)

33. Washington

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 12.5 (16th lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:16.2 (17th lowest)

34. West Virginia

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 16.0 (22nd lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:40.6 (4th highest)

35. Wisconsin

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: Yes

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 11.2 (11th lowest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:22.9 (22nd highest)

36. Wyoming

> License, registration, or permit required to buy gun?: No

> Permit needed to carry handgun?: No

> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 278.2 (the highest)

> Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:43.1 (2nd highest)

Recommended For You

97 Responses to DeSantis Gunhide Question of the Day: How Easy Is It To Buy A Gun In Your State?

  1. Wooooo!!!! Virginia is number 3. Its pretty easy to buy a gun here, just a background check that takes a few minutes and youre out the door. The background check can take while on weekends if there are a lot of gun shows going on in the state during a particular weekend, bogs down the system because so many guns are being sold.

    • Is that a good thing? Unless that means lots of NFA firearms, I’m not sure that’s a good thing. For example, I don’t have any registered weapons (as sad as that is) but my safe is getting full.

      • It’s time to get the family involved, Katy.

        Start dropping hints to the kids that maybe they should get a part-time job baby-sitting or cutting yards this summer instead of hanging around with their friends at some boring pool to help the family afford a bigger home for tools of freedom and the food they eat. Tease ’em with how cool it would be to shoot guns with silencers!

        Pffftpt. I seriously doubt you’re raising gullible kids… 🙂

        • Not sure that a 6yo is going to make too much money, short of miraculously being discovered as the next Mikey or something.

          Probably looking at a display case for a couple of the wood furniture long guns. Since more of those are on the priority purchase list, I can display them all and put off a new safe buy for a few more years.

    • Also, I’m guessing they mean for concealed carry a license is required. No such requirement for open carry.

      So the “only” unconstitutional BS in VA is background check and concealed permit requirement. Oh, and that you have to register legally acquired machine guns with the State Police. Illegally acquired machine guns don’t have to be registered, of course.

      • That’s because everybody knows you have to be an Olympic gymnast to jump through all the hoops here.

      • yeah, this is the 36 easiest states, not the 36 most ridiculous.

        License to purchase: Yes. Firearms Safety Card (test and fee, seems like a license to me)
        Registration: Yes, including long guns.
        Permit: LEO creds required for standard cap mags and off roster pistols.
        Permit to carry: Yes. Unobtanium in most of the state.
        Open Carry: No. Illegal in urban areas, restricted in rural areas. Complicated.
        Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 149.2
        FFL’s per 1000 establishments: 1 (A very low number)
        Waiting Period: 10 days
        Purchase limits: 1 handgun per month (except private party sales and LEO)
        Purchase limits: approved handgun roster (continually reducing number of allowed models)
        Purchase limits: Semi-auto rifles, shotguns and pistols are restricted by feature
        Purchase limits: Magazine xfers for mags with 11+ round capacity are restricted.
        Purchase limits: .50BMG weapons are restricted.

  2. they keep saying “Registered guns per 1000 adults”. lets just say, for the sake of argument, that i lived in texas and wanted to “register” a gun. how would i even go about doing that? maybe the article explains what they mean when they say “register”, but i dont give webclicks to huffpo, so forgive my ignorance.

  3. They f’d up NH.
    Permit for concealed carry. No permit needed for open carry.
    If Hassan wasn’t such a totalitarian witch we’d have had Constitutional carry by now.

    • Same with Nevada. Permit for concealed but no state requirement for open carry (no state law or constitutional prohibition -what is not prohibited is allowed), but be damn careful in the city of North Las Vegas, they have a reputation.

  4. In CA there’s only one gun legal to own. So we take turns. I get it in Feb. of 2076. Unfortunately the one legal bullet in CA was lost in a house fire so when I get the gun all I can do is say Pew, Pew, Pew. No more than 11 times tho. It’s a felony to say Pew 12 times in a row.

  5. Mn need permit to carry or permit to purchase for handguns. Also need them for those scary rifles with pistol grips and evil adjustable stocks. Adjustable stocks hate puppies. Still have private sales although they’re starting to push universal background checks pretty hard.

  6. In New Mexico, there is no license needed to OC a firearm, or to CC an unloaded firearm with a mag in a pocket or belt. No mag capacity limits.
    There is License needed to CC a loaded firearm.

    Class 3 Full auto weapons, suppressors and SBR’s are legal.

    A person can sell and buy (in state,) firearms in local news papers without a permit or background check.

  7. In Illinois I need a FOID card. I got it. Shall issue CC. 72hour wait on pistolas. A day on rifles/shotguns. No silencers. I live a mile from Indiana which is a relative paradise. Since I’ve been a gun owners things have gotten better. But my “rights” hang on a thread in my shite state…

    • Do you IL boys have an “eeeeeevil assault rifle” ban too? Until NY went full retard and stole the show, NJ had been pretty bad. You have my sympathies with the FID card nonsense, but yours is still a better deal. And to think some of those original Belgian FAL rifles were imported through Steyr Arms, which was in NJ at the time. Stoeger was here too. God knows why Henry hasn’t departed yet.

      • Some localities do but thankfully But certain places have bans (looking at you Highland Park.) You can have whatever you want with exception to those areas as long as it’s not NFA. You don’t get any NFA in IL.

        If you’re in NJ you have my sympathies. GL behind enemy lines.

  8. Wyoming doesn’t surprise me given all the four-legged predators. I spent two weeks in the Grand Tetons area on a high school trip. There was a large female moose chilling outside the doorstep when we got to our cabin. Being from the cesspit that is NJ, I had never seen half the animals I got great photos of in person. Beautiful state, and every Wyoming resident I met was a runner, weight lifter, or both to some extent. Not a fatass in sight. Reminds me of Colorado before the acute onset of leftist cancer.

    • “every Wyoming resident I met was a runner, weight lifter, or both to some extent.” That’s to keep in shape for running and climbing trees to escape from all those large dangerous wild animals you saw.

    • Well, I can assure you that not every Wyoming resident is physically fit and in shape. Far from it.

      But we are, on the whole, much better off in this aspect than many states.

  9. PA:
    Walk in store.
    Fill out 4473 for a long gun, fill out an extra PSP form for a handgun.
    PICS check.
    10 minutes later you’re walking out with your new gun.
    That’s PA.

    • As it should be everywhere. Same here in Florida if you have a CCW. Form, check, cash walk out with gun. If no CCW 7 day wait.
      New York was a PIA. No matter what 30 day wait has to be approved by a judge. Buy gun fill out forms and wait for amendment to permit. Pick up hand gun. When I lived in NY. I bought my guns in PA on my non resident PA permit. Then filled out transfer for NY. Technically the gun was illegal in NY till the paperwork went through in 30 days.

      • Florida is weird and the waiting periods actually vary between parts of Florida. In my area it’s 3 business days with CCW

        • What County? We need to let the great folks at Florida Carry know because that is a violation of state law. They will sue that county If you have your FL Concealed Weapons License there is no wait. That is by law. In Florida there is only a 3 day wait for hand guns with out a valid CWL. Only a few grandfathered counties and cities have a 3 wait for hand guns and long guns without a FL CWL

  10. These people will never stop lying to the dumbass American public who believe it to be all true.
    I still remember having to explain to my father a WW2 vet. That a semi-automatic gun isn’t a machinegun. Unlike the Thompson he used. Show him a picture of a Tommy gun and he insisted they are all machine guns. The news said they were so it must be true.

    • I’ve never met a truly anti-gun WW2 veteran, but I have met a couple who went through such hell in the field that they haven’t gone hunting or shooting since. Granted, the last one I talked to was an anti-aircraft gunner on a half track in Europe, and he strongly insisted that firing a quad-M2 rig was, hands down, the most fun a man could have with his pants on.

      • I am pretty sure my father-in-law was solidly anti-gun. Rainbow Division. Arrived in Europe right after the Battle of the Bulge, and just in time to be at Dachau. Fought through to the end of the war a few months later, then guard duty until sent home. He never touched a gun again, and was a liberal Democrat to boot. I think Dachau had a lot to do with his attitude; it is something he would not talk about.

  11. What does it mean to say a gun is registered in a state with no registry? Are we talking about NFA items?

  12. They didn’t quite get MT right, though you need a CWP to carry concealed inside city limits, outside of incorporated cities concealed carry is A-OK. Open carry is legal everywhere without a permit for both long guns and handguns. Without a CWP it takes about 5-10 minutes with the NICS call, with a permit it only tales the time to fill out the form and pay.

  13. In New Jersey it’s really a pain in the ass. First you need a FID card, calling for finger printing, references and mental health checks. Then , if you want handguns it’s purchase permits; the same bull shit again minus the finger prints. Then, you need to find an FFL who isn’t going to take your left lung in transfer fees if you buy online and sales tax (7%) if he has the gun in stock. There’s very little discount on in-stock guns at most NJ FFLs. Overall, one must be a dedicated gun fan to put up with it all. That’s why I’m preparing for a move South.

    • In the same situation. Got my FID card six years ago as a senior in high school, but I had a lot more energy and a higher tolerance for statist bullshit back then. I never got into handguns because of the permit nonsense. If you asked me to do the process over tomorrow, I’d pack my crap and move. I’ve told my mom’s friends’ kids who want to get into shooting “Don’t. Get summer jobs, save up for that dream gun, and wait until you move to greener pastures for college.” They all thanked me later.

  14. To further clarify, in Ohio you can actually open carry a gun with no license. But to conceal carry it you need one.

  15. This should be made more clear. Louisiana needs permit to “conceal” carry. No permit for open carry.

  16. Wait a second, I’m quite insulted. The 4 time winner of the Guns and Ammo most gun friendly state who has no requirement for a permit to either, OC or CCW. One of the two biggest full auto shows, Big Sandy, are here, as well as one of the largest gun shows around, Crossroads of the West winter show with Small arms review. Where tons of full-auto and class 3 weapons are for sale.

  17. Wyoming: “Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 278.2 (the highest)”

    Since there is zero “registration” here, where does this number come from? Makes me doubt all of the statements and numbers here.

    The biggest problem with buying new guns here is that there are so few gun stores in most of the state… simply because there are few towns large enough to support one. That makes on-line or out of state purchases difficult, simply because of the long distance to an FFL to pick it up. The nearest regular service gun store for me is 80 miles away.

    Private sales are very common, and nobody else’s business.

    • “Since there is zero “registration” here, where does this number come from? Makes me doubt all of the statements and numbers here.”

      I’m guessing that’s what the ATF reports as sales from licensed dealers.

      As you noted, like here in Florida, what arrangements are made between two people are nobody’s damn business.

      Since most of those transactions are local, the total number of guns in the state probably doesn’t change all that much.

  18. Just bought a used S&W 22a-1 Friday, in Ohio took all of 3 minutes for paperwork and proceed. Took me longer to pay and get a reciept.

    The only reason it took long to pay was he filled out a card for a free 30 minutes of range time for the purchase. They have an indoor range 25 Yards and a 100 yrd indoor up to 50BMG 😉 Even with the 50 no bullets have gone thru and traveled outside mangeling houses and tearing up all in their path. They have been oepn for about 4 years now.

    As Reggie stated in Ohio no need for a permit to Open Carry. The NICS does not a registration make (Not yet anyway).

  19. Don’ need no permit or r’sration, I jus’ go sees Ray-Ray down on da corner. He be got all da glawks you need.

  20. 28.9 registered guns per 1000 adults. hahahaha. they wish. Unless it’s an nfa item, I wouldn’t even know how to register one of my firearms. I would bet the unregistered ratio to be more like 1:1. maybe higher. The good thing is, They will never know.

  21. One thing that would give them vapors: Georgia’s carry license allows me to bypass the NICS check, so if the system is down like the last time I bought a pistol, no delay for an extra ration of BS foisted on us by the statists.
    The girl behind the counter was happy not to have to tell me that I was going to have to wait around on a Saturday till they fixed it.

    • It is that ‘Just about anywhere’ that can get you in trouble.

      North Las Vegas continues to ignore the state preemption laws and cite/arrest open carriers.

      And various places where carry is restricted, of course.

  22. Michigan:

    Due to Henry Ford opening a big factory and hiring people from Mississippi, Louisiana, etc with the wrong skin color and wrong accent, our beloved leaders in Lansing just K-K-Kouldn’t leave well enough alone and instituted a pistol licensing and registration scheme in 1925-1927, whereby you had to go to the local Sheriff or Chief and beg for a permission slip to buy a pistol. After 1927, you had to bring the gun to him after you bought it so he could give it a ‘safety inspection’ and register it (the inspection was fake, just an excuse to get their hands on it and register it).

    The inspection and permit to purchase are gone as of 2012, and now we have to register every purchase with the state police instead of registering it with the locals and them updating the state registry.
    If you have a CPL, there’s no background check or purchase permit required.
    If you don’t have a CPL, your FFL will run a NICS check before transferring it to you, and if you buy from a private party, you have to get a permit to purchase from the local cops after they run the check.

    Why didn’t they throw the permit to purchase and registry out the window with the safety inspection?
    I suspect it’s because our Republican governor and some of our “pro-gun” ex-cop Republican legislators are not pro freedom.

  23. Its just as easy as getting the wife to agree to a $1000 purchase on something she’ll barely use.

    So… Pretty tough in Louisiana, Texas and Alabama.

  24. It is easier for a male sex offender to use the girls kindergartens bathroom. Yea I need to move. Also am I blind or was AZ not on the list of easy states to buy a gun?

  25. Georgia. here. Dangerous Weapons Carry License
    walk in, pick out firearm, fill out paperwork. pay, walk out with firearm.

  26. Permit for CC only in CO. Denver and Boulder are different, and also stupid, so we don’t count them. Walk in, fill out form, wait for check to clear, walk out. There is also a specific state code forbidding registration, so there’s that. We can discuss UBC’s as a back door registration, but that’s another topic.

    • The only thing that bothers me about Colorado is that CBI check. Not because I think it’s a bad idea mind you, but because the CBI is basically incompetent as far as I can tell.

      A few years back during the height of the gun craze I bought a Ruger Gunsight Scout in .308 from the Gander Mountain in Aurora. It took the CBI six days to process my background check due to the “backlog”.

      Apparently that was a common problem as the CBI dragged ass right up until the NRA threatened to sue them, suddenly the “backlog” dropped to a day at max.

      Same sort of thing at the last gun show I went to… which I want to say was 2013 (it was a few months before the mag ban went into effect). The guy I bought a rifle from said it was taking 4-5 hours for the CBI to process checks from the show, so he actually drove off to his store to run the check because he thought the CBI was “slow walking” the checks for the gun show to make the gun show a pain in the rear. Took him all of 25 minutes to get that processed from this store, but the drive time made the whole thing take a bit over an hour.

  27. Actually, the relevant question is:

    How DIFFICULT and EXPENSIVE is it for a LAW ABIDING citizen to legally purchase a weapon?

    We all know that to the criminals this nonsense doesn’t much matter.

  28. After moving from Maryland, the day I got my Pennsylvania driver’s license, I went and bought a handgun. Walked out the door with it, no fuss, no muss (after passing the NICS check, of course). 4 months later, my ex- finally got her Maryland HQL, after getting fingerprinted/photographed, taking a 4 hour course, and waiting for her background check for the HQL. Then she still had to wait 7 days to pick up the damn handgun after she paid for it (and the 17 round mags were kindly switched out for 10 rounders by the gun shop). Oh, and she had to spend 40 dollars on a “Maryland approved” safety lock.

    But six months earlier, and the week after we split up, she felt unsafe in the house without a gun. So we went to the gun store and she walked out with an HBAR AR-15 for home defense. Riddle me that one, Maryland, ya f*cking idiots!

    • Why does MD make it a giant pain to purchase handguns and not to purchase rifles?

      It could be because handguns are the gun of choice for criminals, and rifles are very rarely used in crime.

      • That would imply that there is at least one gun grabber out there whose proposed solution actually takes some account of facts. Must just want to ban “Evil Black Rifles” because guns, and don’t care if it actually has any bearing on their excuse (crime).

        Still unconstitutional as all hell.

  29. Massachusetts
    1. Mandatory firearms safety course.
    2. Head to local PD (yes, in person) on Tuesday or Thursday between 9-1200 and pick up an application. Fill it out, come back with safety cert and $100. Get photographed and fingerprinted.
    3. Wait 90-100 days while the State does your background check (if they really do).
    4. PD calls, come get your permit on Tuesday or Thursday between 9-1200.

    Then it’s a piece o cake to buy one of the very few state-approved firearms for the next 6 years.

  30. “> Registered guns per 1,000 adults: 15.1 (20th lowest)”

    Imbeciles, other than NFA items there AREN’T any “registered” guns in Ohio!!! There’s no WAY to “register” a gun in Ohio!!! There’s no state registration and there are NO gun laws below the state level, Frank Jackson’s bad acid trips notwithstanding.

    You pretty much have to be a victim of generations of inbreeding and foetal alcohol syndrome in order to be a gun control advocate…

  31. With kudos to jwm, the CURRENT requirements for purchasing a firearm in California are as follows:
    1. Obtain an Firearms Safety Certificate (applies to both long guns and handguns). The former handgun safety certificates are still valid until they expire for handgun purchases only. $25 and a multiple choice test, 70% to pass (not hard).
    2. Purchase a firearm, fill out the paperwork, and wait ten days for the background check to clear. Although California submits to the NICS, it performs its own background check. On day 10, the FFL calls into the DOJ to make sure that the buyer hasn’t become prohibited in the interim. $25 plus transfer fees. Most dealers charge $25-$35 for guns they sell, $75-$100 for guns they don’t, even if it is a gun they don’t sell and cannot order.
    3. Handguns MUST appear on the California roster of “Not Unsafe” firearms. or must fall within one of the few exemptions in the code (person to person private party transfer, or transfer from between parents/grandparents/child. No transfers between children, aunts, uncles or cousins within the exemption.)
    4. I have been told that California has no firearms “registration” by both an employee of an FFL and a recently retired police officer. However, every time a gun is seized, the police check to see to whom it is “registered.” The fact is that California maintains an electronic database of all handguns sold since 1991 and all long guns since 1/1/2015, they just don’t call it “registration.” People moving into the state are required to “report” any guns they brought with them.
    5. There is a ten round mag capacity limit, although mags purchased prior to 1991 are (currently) grandfathered. The Legislature this session is seeking to change that to an outright ban. (SF and LA have already outright banned “large capacity” mags.) This ban applies to people moving into the state, as it is illegal to import 10+ mags.
    6. Currently, all semiauto rifles with detachable magazines require that one must use a tool to remove the mag, i.e., be equipped with “Bullet Button”. This too may change; there are three bills pending to require that mags must be fixed, and removable only if the action is disassembled (i.e., popping the take-down pins), and a fourth that would ban all semiauto rifles that are not “antiques.” (“Antiques” is not defined, so we assume the author refers to the federal definition, i.e., manufactured prior to 1899 etc.) Rifles that do not comply with any new law are grandfathered, but must be registered as “assault weapons,” the consequence of which is that the firearm may not be transferred in the state by sale or inheritance, and must be shipped out of state or turned into the police.
    7. California has an “assault weapons” ban from 1991 that, among other things, banned all automatic weapons, and requiring registration of all currently owned ones. I am not sure, but I think that bill also banned SBRs and sound suppressors.
    8. The Gubernator signed a bill banning .50 BMG rifles. No one really understands why; the excuse for the bill was that this caliber was “able to shoot down airplanes” and therefore had to be banned to prevent terrorist attacks. Other calibers, including .338 Lapua are still perfectly legal. Barret makes another rifle, I don’t recall the caliber precisely, that is slightly smaller than .50 cal. which is also legal.
    9. Open carry is banned in all incorporated areas (i.e. cities and towns), and in some unincorporated areas adjacent to incorporated areas.
    10. CCWs are required for concealed carry. he basic application fee varies a bit, but is around $125. An applicant must demonstrate “good cause” and “good moral character,” the definition of which is within the discretion of each county sheriff. This means that all large urban areas other than Sacramento (and for some unknown reason Imperial County) are basically no issue, while others are “essentially” shall issue. San Francisco prides itself on the fact that it has issued only 4 CCWs, all of which were to employees of the Sheriff’s Office or the SFPD. In addition to showing “good cause,” state law requires “up to” 16 hours of training (including both classroom and range time) (variable by instructor, around $150) and a thorough background check, plus an interview. Some counties require (contrary to State law) letters of recommendation, and are known to contact employers, references and neighbors as part of their investigation. State law permissively allow a county to require a mental health exam (the same exam as is given to police officer applicants), at a maximum fee of $125. Some counties also require (again contrary to State law) that the applicant purchase a $1 million liability policy naming the issuing agency as an additional insured. CCWs are valid for only 2 years, but the training requirement is only 4 hours. Some counties require a showing of a current “good cause” for issuance, i.e., a threat that cannot be adequately handled by the police.
    11. Whatever else they can think of next. Currently pending are the folloiwing: 1.a ballot proposition that would require an ammunition purchase permit, with background check ($50), licensing of all vendors, face to face ammo transfers only (meaning that internet purchases will be more expensive or impossible if a local dealer doew not want the hassle of complying with the law). At the transfer, the vendor records the buyer’s name, address, tel number, license number, and amount and caliber of ammo purchased, which is reported to the DOJ, he also performs an instant background check through NICS. 2. Not to be outdone by the Newsome proposition, Senator DeLeon has proposed a competing bill in the Legislature that eliminates the licensing requirement, but does require the recordation of purchaser info into a permanent record, and further requires the vendor to check the state’s records (I don’t recall the acronym) to see if the purchaser owns a firearm in that caliber; if not, no sale. (Purchases at gun ranges for use at the range are exempt. Oh boy!) The bill ignores the fact that since the bill applies to all ammo, and since “registration” of long arms has existed only since 2015 and handguns since 1991, buyers will be required to “report” at least one of their rifles or shotguns to the state in each caliber they wish to purchase.3. There is also a bill pending to ban “80%” lowers unless the owner applies to and obtains from the state a unique identifier (serial number) prior to beginning fabrication, which identifier must be permanently attached or engraved onto the receiver. Owners of “ghost guns” will be required to apply to the state for such identifiers, irrespective of date of manufacture.

    • As an inmate of Kommieforniastan…..I WILL NOT COMPLY. F’m As for the ammo, apparently Newsom hasn’t quite figured out that Nevada, Oregon, Arizona are fairly close to most people and last I looked, they don’t ask for a DL to buy ammo and they don’t inspect your car at the border, not that there aren’t ways around the Ag check points.

      • True, but it is a misdemeanor to import ammo into the state without a vendor’s license. Fine goes up for each subsequent arrest and conviction. I assume that once you’ve been popped, they will try to pop you every time they see you. Newsome’s grand scheme is to have the ag inspection stations do the dirty work, but it is questionable whether that will fly. The DOJ has been known to send inspectors to gun shows in Nevada (Reno) and to record the numbers from California plates, stopping people who have walked out of the shows with firearms. No reason to think that they won’t do the same for anyone buying large amounts of ammo, and then confiscating the ammo at the time of arrest. That would be worse than the fine. And then of course there is the cost and time involved in driving out of state. For me, that is a three or four hour drive each way, over mountains. the gas alone pays the $50 license fee.

  32. Florida and it’s not easy enough. To get the most common firearm in the country (the M4 Carbine) I have to be a government agent or otherwise it’s just “no”.

    Have you written to your canidates telling them to repeal the NFA and GCA?

  33. Is this list the one from Huffpo? I’m assuming so because it has a bunch of stuff in it that is wrong.

    Most notably this list says that New Mexico, Colorado and Ohio all require a permit to carry a handgun.

    That’s not true. I’ve lived in all three states and all three of them are open carry states. Concealed carry requires a permit in all three, but OC does not.

    Secondly, each of these states has a “registered guns per 1000 adults” number. How exactly is that number gleaned because none of these three states require registration either?

    In fact, while I’m not 100% sure about Ohio since I haven’t lived there since 2009, even if someone wanted to register a gun in NM they couldn’t because the state has no system for registration and I’m pretty sure that’s the same here in Colorado. The CBI might keep some information on how many guns are sold each year, but there’s no “registry”. Without a registry how can you have “registered guns”?

  34. Guideline to buy a gun in any state: you go to the democrate stronghold part of town, find the guy who votes democrate for all the free stuff the politicians promises and gives them. He will be hanging on the corner or stoop.
    He is also works as an unlicensed pharmact for cash. So none of that pesky w2 or 1099 to ruin his free stuff. For about 30-50% more than it cost in a store you can get a gun.

  35. Here in New York it’s easy to buy a long gun, you just go to the store, fill out your 4473, and you’re all set. Granted, our selection has been decreased as time has gone on (but yes, you can still buy an AR-15 here, even after the SAFE Act, and no, it doesn’t have to be registered) but things only get dicey when you start getting into handguns. In that case, you have go through an arbitrary and emasculating permitting process, and the gun has to be registered.

    EDIT: I forgot to mention, when I say New York, I mean upstate, not that progressive dystopia at the bottom of the state. Pretty sure most of the constitution has been abolished in NYC.

  36. It’s really easy to buy a gun in any state (one way or another). Also, my CNC mill works great at making receivers, which also, coincidentally, works in every state.

    • There is a bill winding its way through the Legislative process in California that will attempt to ban 80% lowers, as well as a renewal of Senator DeLeon’s “ghost gun” bill that will require that anyone buy a serial number from the state, with a background check, that must be permanently affixed to the reciever, before starting a build, i.e., de facto registration, as is now the case with all firearm purchases.

  37. Just an anecdote from my time in N.Y. (Nassau Cty.) A friend had jumped through the hoops to obtain a N.Y. license. Took almost a year. He called me and said he was going to a gun shop near me; would I like to tag along? We went in, he made his purchase, (not a firearm) and noticed a nice polished Ruger revolver in the showcase. Asked the ‘female’ clerk if he could look at it, (i.e-handle it). In the best ‘large Marge’ voice I’ve heard outside of a Pee Wee Herman movie, she demanded, ‘Can I see yer license?’ I have been blessed to live in Fla. since shortly after that.

  38. Indiana…
    > Federal firearm licensees per 1,000 establishments:20.7 (23rd lowest)
    So how do we keep supplying all those guns to Chiraq?

  39. Midstate Gun is meh. Nice range, but meh with the store.

    D&L is where it’s at Bob and you know that.

  40. Noticed they didn’t list Arizona, so I’ll clue you all in: it’s way too easy to buy guns in my state. So easy, we can’t stop murdering each other as a direct result. I have to buy new Ugg boots every week cuz it’s so hard to wash off the blood flowing in the streets.

  41. avatar They had guns to Brian's head after he was handcuffed but they still did not want to get caught when people started crowding around so Brian is still alive. For now. says:

    Hawaii: Take “Hunter Ed.” course. Wait. Go to HPD and submit FINGERPRINTS and all personal ID and pay to ask for permit for long gun or one permit per pistol. Wait. Get approved if NICS says ok and no way to deny you. Then everything is registered, making sure to demand you tell the name of the place you will be keeping the firearm, with punishment for falsification.

    Then your name is cross checked against welfare rolls and charities who take your info. Ever been poor and needed to hit a food bank? They gonna find out. Your income and contacts with family on the mainland who can potentially rescue you or expose local actions are checked. And a final check to make sure you are not related to the wrong person who works for the right gov agency, legal/political firm or has knowledge of the proper secret handshake. (Source – Dad worked the illegal registration desk at HPD when he was a cop)

    And then you wait.

    And maybe if you pass the final test, if you make enough money and are related to the right people and are not too vulnerable, if you don’t express the wrong opinions like mentioning the constitution in a positive way or help homeless people or take pictures of the wrong things or try to stop the “chosen” upper castes if you catch them doing the “wrong” things to innocent people, maybe they won’t “investigate” you for the rest of your life. After all, “gun owners” are all “potentially violent” (Official HPD terms used). Did you wear a backpack today? You could have been carrying a gun. This is grounds for investigation. For the rest of your life.

    According to the local judges and cops, owning a gun makes it OK for the cops to do anything they want to you because “Public Safety”. One of the times I was illegally arrested for taking video of one of my Mom’s neighbors tauntingly making death threats (He was an HPD employee and would let the local CRU ‘crime reduction unit’ cops hang out at his house like a local outpost. CRU is like a sort of secret police who do not use badges and nametags and murder people for their bosses, like if you take video of the cops doing something illegal or if you interrupt any of the meth or child trafficking ops the local rich people run. The courts will cover up everything they do. This is in Honolulu, Hawaii, supposedly an American state.) The patrol cops conversation went like this as they were watching the video they took of my arrest “Why did they do that to him?” Reply- “He is a gun owner.” Rebuttal- “Well they should have shot him then.”

    Lord knows not all the cops here are evil people, but I have lost years of my life to this state sponsored terrorism.

  42. I’m pretty sure when they write about a permit to carry, they mean. carrying concealed, i.e., a CCW of some sort.

    The concept of open carry, even with a permit, would make their heads explode, so they didn’t consider listing whether you needed a permit to do it.

  43. List shows that Nevada requires a permit to carry. That is false.

    The only permit is for Concealed Carry. The last ‘permitting’ scheme (handgun registration in Clark County) was abolished last year.

    The city of North Las Vegas still ignores the state preemption laws and will cite or arrest open carriers.

  44. For Nevada purchasing:

    • Currently no background check for private sales (however, Bloomberg’s minions have gotten a ballot initiative for this fall in Nevada with the same language as I594 in Washington state)

    • Retail sales require a 4473 and BGC. The BCG can be bypassed with a current CCW.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *