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You’re looking at the SRS-A1 Covert from Desert Tech. It’s an incredibly compact — 27 inches overall length — bolt action, bullpup sniper rifle with a “1/2 MOA or better” guarantee. In 60 seconds the operator can swap out the barrel and bolt for any one of seven calibers in an array of barrel lengths. The one seen above is rocking .308 Win in a 16″ barrel. Desert Tech has a lot of other cool stuff in the works, too, including ammo and suppressors . . .

Here’s that rapid barrel swap in real time:

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As you’d expect, DT’s ammo is billed as ultra-premium, match-grade stuff.

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DT’s suppressors look pretty straightforward, but have some neat features. Their #1 concern appears to be accuracy — minimal, completely-repeatable POI shift and an expected reduction in group sizes — but they’re also extremely lightweight (.30 cal can weighs 16 oz) and are self-tightening.

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Yeah, we’ve all been waiting to see the MDR finally hit dealer shelves. I’m hearing August, now, for first retail deliveries. The one above is configured for .308, and the one below for 5.56. It’s the same gun, though, and can switch calibers with what’s supposed to be a simple barrel, bolt, and magwell block swap. A .300 BLK conversion should also be available.

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Apparently I can expect an HTI in .50 BMG to arrive at my FFL next week. A <1/2 MOA, bullpup .50 cal? This is going to be fun.

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25 Responses to Guns, Ammo, and Silencers from Desert Tech

  1. This thing looks awesome and yeah fun . Does this come with in a package similar to the Rossi interchangeable barrels or purchased separate ? And the cost ?

    • They do sell package deals, the last SRS-A1 Covert .338/.308 I saw was priced just under $6,000 retail, MSRP is $6,945 for that package. The receiver/chassis is $3,395, and each caliber runs from $1,600 to $1,950 – those are all MSRP, the retail prices tend to be quite a bit lower.

      For $10,000 or less, you can set yourself up with the chassis, one barrel/bolt combo, a decent scope (Nightforce or S&B), and a silencer. It’s more than a hunting rifle, but worth every dollar of the cost. You’d be hard pressed to find a more accurate, comfortable rifle on the market.

  2. On one hand, it is great to see the currently popularity of firearms and accessories.

    On the other hand, this popularity brings new companies, at least half of which sell slick-looking junk with slick marketing. Like these hucksters….

    “Our weldless monocore designs uniformly strip gas from the projectile as it exits the muzzle. This avoids gas disturbance and maximizes projectile stability”

    What a load of word salad marketing BS. ‘Strips gas from the projectile’? Is it a gyrojet round? Is it a rocket? Do these idiots know anything at all about sound attenuation, or what’s even really happening when you discharge a round?

    ‘Avoids gas disturbance and maximizes projectile stability’? The fluid (air) is being ‘disturbed’ by the projectile passing through it at a high rate of speed. You are not ‘avoiding’ any of that. Followed by the expanding charge behind it.

    The BS sounds ‘sciency’ if you don’t know anything about actual science. If you’ve done any kind of research on sound attenuation,. or shaping, you know that PT Barnum is in da house.

    • Jesus Christ, look at this guy. So angry you’d think he has a personal stake in this…

      Anyway, nothing you said holds water. Upon exiting the muzzle, the combustion gasses will expand at a higher speed than the bullet flight. Just watch ANY high speed camera footage and you will see the gasses enveloping the bullet as it exits the muzzle. These gasses exert a force on the bullet during the most crucial point of it’s flight path. If you can use a series of baffles to prevent the gas from overtaking the bullet, you can minimize the effect of this turbulence. It’s not even a novel concept: many suppressor manufacturers allude to this effect and suppressor design has been proven to have an effect on accuracy.

      Your attacks on the company itself are also laughable. Hucksters? On what do you base this clear accusation of fraud? Self-tightening? Seems novel to me, as I have never seen any other suppressor market such a feature. Again, on what grounds do you base your accusations of falsehood? If you have any actual data to provide (what with you obviously being the greatest scientific mind of our era), then please provide it.

      You don’t seem to understand that these aren’t new guys you’re talking about here. They have been manufacturing and selling variations of the SRS since 2008 and although I don’t own one myself, many others do and I’ve never seen major complaints about them. The rifles themselves seem to be based on the German DSR-1 in use by GSG 9 counter-terror units, so the basic design at least is proven.

      By the way, hyphenating a word that can’t fit on a line is a common and accepted practice, so read a fucking book with words longer than five letters before you try acting the pedant in future.

      • Angry? That’s amusing, I merely point out the obvious. Obvious if you know fluid dynamics anyway. Someone here does have their knickers in a twist though. I do so wonder why? If you’re still watching high-speed photography, you’ve outed yourself rather thoroughly as to the ‘depth’ of your scientific knowledge.

        As to the novelty of your “patent pending”, apparently you aren’t familiar with the prior art. You should spend some money on a competent search, or spend a few days poring over abstracts. Or roll the dice as CMC did – anyone who knows guns knew that was a joke patent that should have never passed muster. Your response sounds eerily like the one from the president of CMC…

        BTW- One pays money for booths. One’s booth purveyor does not hyphenate words in graphics, that are not natively hypenated. That’s amateur sloppy layout, and would normally be rejected by the purchaser. In this case, the purchaser was not very discerning. Apparently you share the same low bar. That’s what customers see – sloppy. Reflects on the whole presentation, and the company. Can’t even get the signs right, wonder what else they skipped?

        If the product is good, it won’t be harmed in any way by my ‘mean’ criticism. Always rather sad when companies send their employees (or worse principals) out to battle on the interwebs. Smart companies observe and learn what their customers (and critics) tell them. They don’t attempt to go mano-a-mano in forums. I’ve seen posts like yours before, they are painfully desperate to read.

        Can’t take the heat, do get out of the kitchen. TTAG is definitely not a “safe space”.

    • While I can’t speak for their suppressors, I do have an SRS A1, and it is top notch. First day shooting I got .3 MOA @ 100 yards. The ease of disassembly is wonderful, and it does truly return to zero, which I was quite amazed by.

      Also, they’re not some random new company. They’ve been producing these high end rifles since 2007. I was pining for one ever since I saw one used on a Mythbusters. Several years later, and much of my collection sold, I was able to buy one. It is an excellent rifle, and I expect their suppressors to be equally as well made, although they are equally pricey.

  3. Hold on, the MDR in 223 is a 308 with a conversion kit?

    I thought bullpup is about being short?

    • The MDR was built to be a 308 bullpup first. The conversion kits are for the smaller rounds. The overall length is the same but the 5.56 weighs more than the 308 because of the magwell adapter. Got one preordered already. August release would be nice. I was thinking 2017 at the earliest with all the delays.

  4. Oh, and that “patent pending” self-tightening silencer?

    Yeah, that’ll be pending until they find the idiot who slammed that CMC patent through the first time to examine that for “novelty”. Does anybody do a patent search before they file anymore, or do they just throw it up against the wall and see if it sticks?

    And what highschooler did their booth visuals? “Intention-ally”? A visual piece that didn’t even get the copy formatted correctly?

    • I can’t disagree with your feelings towards hyphenating words to the next line 16v, but the fact is it has been common practice for over two hundred years, if not since the beginning of printing altogether.

      It does seem to be A LOT more prevalent in USA style marketing though, maybe it’s just a ‘class’ thing {SARCASM}?

      • Two company trolls? Gosh, I’ve struck paydirt.

        Obviously you have had no education on what a professional booth display is supposed to look like, or you wouldn’t be proudly announcing your pathetic unawareness.

        Once again, if it isn’t hyphenated natively, then one never introduces a hyphen. One re-figures the layout to make it work seamlessly.

  5. A buddy of mine has a DT in .338. I was very impressed at the accuracy.
    That bull pup is a sweet looking machine.

    • A buddy of mine has one as well, with several barrel/caliber combos. It’s accurate, but not very ergonomic. It’s also very well-built and nicely finished. You can get similar accuracy for far less, but he’s very happy with his purchase.

      As far as their .50 cal. I’m sure it’s nice as well, but there’s already a great bullpup .50 on the market: the Bluegrass Armory Viper. My buddy and I each bought one and they were easily 1/2 minute rifles as far as we could shoot them (which was about 800 yards.) Problem with shooting a 50 that accurately is that after the fifth shot or so the concussion has your head ringing so hard it’s difficult to concentrate!

    • I was impressed by the DT in .338 as well, but couldn’t justify the price. I went with the Savage 110 BA .338 instead because it’s “reasonably priced.” Plus I don’t think a .338 needs to be a compact / short gun. If price wasn’t an object, I would definitely consider DT, even if it means 16V might not like me anymore.

      • C’mon now. You know I’d still like you. I may question your price/value choice, and even argue with you about same, but I have never had a reason not to like you.

  6. Too bad DT can’t pay their suppliers on time. Great gun company run by terrible business people.

  7. Correct me if I’m wrong, but 1/2″ group with a 1/2″ diameter bullet is going to be a single hole every time? Or is it 1/2 from center hole to center hole, so the holes can overlap and still be a 1/2″ group?

    • I think the measurement of extreme spread is bullet centre to centre

      So the 1/2″ group with 1/2″ bullets measures 1″ from edge to edge, but 1/2″ from the centres of the 2 farthest laid shots

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