And the pre-SHOT shower of press releases rolls on. Next up: A new .308/7.62 carbine from CMMG. Geissele trigger, Magpul stock and grip and rail space from here to Manitoba. Make the jump for the obligatory press release . . .

Fayette, MO—The Mk3 CBR (Carbine Battle Rifle) is chambered in .308 WIN/7.62x51mm NATO and is precision-built to deliver the relentless functionality that CMMG rifles are known for. The Mk3 CBR is an ideal rifle for long-range shooting or close-quarters action and because it’s built with CMMG’s premium manufacturing requirements, it gives shooters the chance to own a high-end AR rifle at a practical price.

The Mk3 CBR features the free float RKM15 KeyMod hand guard that measures 15 inches in length to accommodate a wide range of hand positions and allows users to attach an assortment of different accessories. The KeyMod slots are located at the 3, 6 and 9 o’clock positions with a 1913 Picatinny rail on top to give the hand guard an array of mounting options.

The KeyMod system is the new industry standard for mounting accessories. It is a simple, comfortable and lightweight solution that offers users a low profile mounting alternative to the M1913 Picatinny rail. The KeyMod system presents a new level of customization, as it allows the direct attachment of compatible accessories without the use of intermediate M1913 Picatinny rails. For accessories that are not yet KeyMod compatible, users can purchase a separate CMMG 5-slot Picatinny adapter rail that can be easily attached to any of the KeyMod slots for optimal placement of the accessories.

The Mk3 CBR rifle is constructed with a hard anodized, billet 6061-T6 aluminum receiver.  A 416 stainless barrel was selected and features a nitride finish that provides the barrel with long lasting accuracy and corrosion resistance. CMMG’s medium taper (MT) barrel is the perfect balance between weight and rigidity. The rifle also includes a CMMG SV muzzle brake, designed to reduce recoil and increase muzzle control for quick and manageable follow-up shots.

By partnering with other industry leaders, the Mk3 CBR has some of the best components available to complete the rifle. Some of these parts include a Geissele Automatics SSA® 2-stage trigger, a Magpul ACS-L™ collapsible butt stock and Magpul MOE® pistol grip. The rifle also comes with a Magpul 20 LR PMAG® with a 20 round capacity. The combination of all of these features creates one of the most capable and affordable .308 WIN rifles available.

CMMG Mk3 CBR Specifications:

Caliber:  .308 WIN/7.62x51mm NATO
Weight:  9 lbs. (unloaded), 10 lbs. (loaded with 20-rd PMAG)
Barrel:  16″ 416 Stainless Steel, 1:10″ Twist, 5/8-24 Threaded
Hand Guard:  RKM15 KeyMod Hand Guard
Sights/Gas Block:  Low Profile Gas Block
Muzzle:  CMMG SV muzzle brake
Furniture:  Magpul MOE Pistol Grip & ACS-L butt stock
Trigger:  Geissele Super Semi-Automatic (SSA) 2 Stage Trigger
Magazine:  20rd Magpul 20 LR PMAG
MSRP:  $1,999.95

CMMG Lifetime Quality Guarantee
CMMG, Inc. will guarantee its products against defects in material or workmanship.  CMMG, Inc. will repair, replace or substitute part(s) (at CMMG, Inc. discretion) at no charge to the customer if a defect of material or workmanship is found. All service work must be carried out by CMMG, Inc.

About CMMG:
CMMG began in central Missouri in 2002 and quickly developed into a full-time business because of its group of knowledgeable and passionate weapons enthusiasts committed to quality and service. Its reputation was built on attention to detail, cutting edge innovation and the superior craftsmanship that comes from sourcing all their own parts. By offering high quality AR rifles, parts and accessories, CMMG’s commitment to top-quality products and professional service is as deep today as it was when we began.

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38 Responses to New From CMMG: MK3 CBR (Carbine Battle Rifle)

  1. Why would I buy this over a M1A, FAL, SCAR , SIG-716 or the whole host of other guns in 7.62 at around the same price point?

    I am underwhelmed here

    • I would bet the street price will be somewhere around $1500-$1700…making it in a price point that would make sense to purchase this over the rifles you mentioned.

      • The SCAR is a lot more true, a FAL or HK93 clone is around $1,000.00
        The SIG-716 is about the same price; what does this gun do so much better than the others I have listed?

        • Every price Ive seen both in person and online for a Sig716 is close to $2K. A FAL clone or G3 clone you buy for a grand is likely a used parts kit gun, not exactly the same as a new manufacture of an AR style rifle.

        • My walmart has the 716 Patrol in stock for 2K, I handled the heck out of her about 6 dozen times and if it was the precision model it would be in my safe. Without opening too much of a can of worms, the 716 is Piston so if that is your thing than the extra $300 may worth it over the estimated $1700 of this rifle. Then again the MK3 has that sweet trigger pushing you back another $200 so now your looking at a $1700 vs $2200 (If you plan on installing the Geissele trigger)

          The 716 comes with flip up sights this one doesn’t. The MK3 does have a full rail where I believe the 716 comes up slightly shorter. In the end I’d rather have a 716 but this one doesn’t look too shabby either

        • A DSA FAL with new parts will cost far more than a grand. Neither the FAL nor the G3 (HK) is likely to have the accuracy of an AR clone, and the HK will beat you up with recoil. I have owned and extensively shot all of the above (except for the SCAR) – for the average guy, the AR is a better platform, even though the others have a great deal of history and panache.

          This looks like a good setup – for a few bucks more than a Rock River LAR-8, you’ll have a better trigger and likely better rail setup (unless RRA actually puts their Project X guns into production – they look sweet as well).

    • accuracy (vs FAL). low price (vs SCAR/SIG). reloadability (vs HK clones). Optics ready (vs M1a).

      Just my thoughts here.

      • Every dealing I’ve had with buds has been fine. An XD a glock 17 gen 4 during the panic. And a sig 566 classic swat.
        All guns brand new.

        I recommend them.

        And the use of buds in this post was an example, not an absolute. As always, YMMV, but they are on the street. And have been for some time.

      • Even before CT gun laws went full retard (never go full retard), Buds wouldn’t ship any handguns or semi-auto rifles to the The UnConstitution State, so I never had the pleasure of dealing with them.

      • People like to harp on Buds but I’ve had nothing but luck with them. This was even after I messed up the payment method on a gun purchase – a quick call to them straightened it out.

  2. If 2k is the msrp and street price is about 1500-1700, is that what is now deemed an practically priced rifle? I suppose its probably practical for a high quality top shelf AR

  3. Carbine Battle Rifle? Do not the first and third words of that clumsy description contradict each other? Who will I go into “battle” against with such a carbine rifle? Who is the marketing numbnuts who came up with this misnomer? And why am I asking all these questions?

    • Ralph,

      your words are hatespeak (TM) against little people. Little People, I might remind you, also need battle rifles. Short little battle rifle-carbine..rifles.

    • Because you’ve become as cynical as some of the rest of us have in the era of Hope-n-Change.

      When I read “Carbine battle rifle” my mental reaction was: “C’mon now… really? Is there no one under the age of 40 with a command of the English language left in this country?”

      Owing to the 16″ barrel length, this is a carbine. Owing to the ugly, clunky tube festooned with wanker rails surrounding the barrel, it is a poor implementation of a carbine. Because it is a carbine, it is not a “battle rifle.”

  4. Anyone who never shot an AR with 416r barrel and geissele trigger, cannot understand why it is miles better than your FAL / SCAR. Crappy triggers ruin these nice guns. Most shooters shoot like poo, then add a 6-8 lbs trigger. Now you are blowing 308 and only getting 3-4 MOA @ 100

  5. Anyone care to offer an opinion about barrel length in these .308 ARs? I’ve been window shopping and have been leaning towards 18 or 20 inch barrels with mid or rifle length gas systems.

    • Well, depending on the load, the 20″ will definitely give better velocity than a 16″ barrel. A 20″ barrel will usually run 25-75 FPS less than SAAMI specs, whereas a 16″ barrel will usually run roughly 125-250 FPS below SAAMI spec. There is a wide variance due to bullet weight, powder used, etc.

      Neither a 16″ nor 20″ AR10 is exceptionally flat shooting, but most applications these days tend toward the 16″ barrel. My buddy shot a good sized white tail doe with a 16″ POF .308 AR 180 grain Trophy Bonded Tip and I shot mine with a 20″ Rem 700 LTR .308 165 grain Hornady Superperformance GMX. Both deer were shot under 50 yards, both had extensive heart / lung damage, both were through and through nearly broadside shots, and both are venison in the freezer.

      Unless you regularly shoot over 400 yards, the 16″ should be fine. If you regularly shoot over 600 yards there are a host of calibers that work better than the .308.

  6. Got my Sig 716 for $1800 and split the tax with the LGS and that was like a couple months ago. The first time I shouldered the 716 I knew I had to have it. Heavy Metal or He Man class all the way. The gun is a shooting be-atch. And oddly enough loves Cabelas/Herters steel cased ammo. Shoots it more accurately than Nato ball. Core 30, S&W something or other (butt ugly), Armalite AR10, etc and so forth. Every AR mfr (read parts being screwed together) has one or better have one to sell.

  7. I bought a full CMMG ar-15 last December during the panic. It’s funny, I had been in to see my LGS the day before Newtown and had picked out a nice BCM rifle around $1200. Had done research and liked their rep. Got online the day after the shooting and realized everyone was buying up ar-15s. Got to LGS first thing Monday and the CMMG was the only rifle left near my range, at an inflated $1400. I bought it not knowing a thing about the company. It’s been 100% solid and seems to be well made.

    If I started pooping money I would consider this rifle.

  8. I placed my order yesterday! CMMG products continue to impress. I would like see you nay-sayers build this cheaper with these high quality parts. You cant! CMMG just gets better and better.. Scar ~ pfff

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