Ralph and I went to see Olympus Down last night. If you’ve played Call of Duty Modern Warfare 2 Act 2: Mission “White House” you’ll love Olympus Down. Any differences between the the videogame and the movie are strictly coincidental. Hoo-boy is it violent! Olympus has more head shots than Models 1. As does this video for Biting Elbows’ Bad Motherfucker. While I like simulated violence as much as the next guy, I remember NRA jefe Wayne LaPierre’s attempt to raise a big stink about videogame and movie violence in his post-Newtown presser. You know; we need to look at the root causes of spree killing rather than Adam Lanza’s Bushmaster AR-15. It looks like the stratagem  failed even worse than the federal assault weapons ban bill. Is that a problem?

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34 Responses to Question of the Day: Hollywood Violence “Worse” Than Ever [Video NSFW]. And?

  1. In my opinion, there are some problems with laying the blame on media violence.

    First and foremost is that there really isn’t a factual connection between media violence and actual violence. Yes, some of these mass killers were known to play first-person shooters and the like – but millions of others play violent video games without turning into killers. Blaming the media is no more logically than blaming guns.

    Second, there is the appearance that the NRA is simply trying to pass the blame onto another easy target. A lot of folks who are basically neutral on the topic of 2A rights might be inclined to look at this in a negative fashion.

    Third, a lot of young gun owners are also fans of actual firearms. I’m not sure what the actual overlap might look like, but a quick peek at the comments here and on gun forums suggests some correlation. Seeing as how it’s extremely important for the NRA to attract this group, attacking one of their favorite pasttimes is pretty dumb.

    • “First and foremost is that there really isn’t a factual connection between media violence and actual violence. Yes, some of these mass killers were known to play first-person shooters and the like – but millions of others play violent video games without turning into killers.”

      BUT SOME DID. Combine 1P shooters with government mind control, and whaddaya got?

      The latest Holmes or Lanza, that’s who. I know many of you don’t want to believe it, but it’s been positively established: it remarkably easy to brainwash your next shooter, backed by fifty years of expensive research, and nuts-and-bolts, trial-and-error putting it into practice.

      • Non-crazy people can deal with violence in their media and can safely own firearms. Crazy people, not so much. It’s pretty hypocritical to decry those that blame guns for violence while we push a scapegoat of our own.

      • If your hypothesis is correct – and I’ve seen no evidence suggesting that it is – then the problem would lie with this “government mind control” or “brainwashing”, and not with media violence.

  2. I don’t believe in graffic violence in movies or games.I do believe in the Proverb”Raise up a child in the way he should go when he grows older he will not depart from it”Our children need to learn from parents of charachter and high morals and ethics, not violent movies or video games.Don’t get me wrong I am a vet. of the USMC and if you try to hurt me or my family or any innocent people around me, I will stop you by deadly force if I can.

    • +100!

      The violence in games and on TV exasperates the downfall of morals and decency. Without the proper direction then being exposed to ‘gratuitous violence’ can lead to bad or criminal behavior. In a world with no right or wrong you get the make believe world depicted in the video.

  3. Despite a high level of violence, “Olympus Has Fallen” was actually a morality play. There were good guys and bad guys and the line separating them was very clear. The bad guys were attacking; the good guys were defending. The good guys protected dogs, children and women; the BGs shot dogs, children and women.The good guys were buddies; the BGs not so much. And the good guys wore nicer suits.

    • “Despite a high level of violence, “Olympus Has Fallen” was actually a morality play.”

      So us the Jerry Springer Show, once he adds his little “get off blame hook” morality speech at the end. But it doesn’t excuse the kind of behavior splashed in viewers’ faces, day after day: “this is how people more trashy than us behave! WATCH!”

  4. It’s more about the age of the viewer/player than the content. I don’t drink the violence Kool-Aid anymore since if it’s a lot bad for kids, it’s a little bad for adults. Another factor is that for some kids this is the only exciting part of their lives. There is nothing else in their lives to compete against the dark entertainment.

  5. One of the issues that needs to be addressed isn’t so much violence in games and on TV, although that has some impact. The issue at hand is the glorification of these violent offenders that commit these horrible acts. How many can name the victims from Sandy Hook, or VT, or Columbine, or Aurora, or anywhere else that has been struck by tragedy? We can certainly name the killers, by name (first, middle, and last). If the initial findings from Adam Lanza’s computer investigation are true, he studied other killers with the intent of being “1up”. That’s why (at least one reason) these sick people are doing what they are doing. Fix that problem, but good luck trying to muzzle the out of control media that can’t even seem to get the real story straight half the time.

    • You know who you are if you can reel off the names of mass shooting victims?
      MICHAEL MOORE. Isn’t it interesting that HE was privileged to view photos of the Sandy Hook massacre. Would it have happened if he hadn’t ASKED TO? He views grisly photos, gets on high horse about guns… what a fortunate turn of circumstances!

      • The point was, the glorification of the shooters seems to be more important to the media than the victims. There is definitely a correlation between the fact that Lanza researched and tallied other similar shootings prior to committing his violent act. What conclusion can you come to, knowing that information?

  6. Jeepjockey59, i think youʻre way off base.

    Violent movies and video games are no different than violence in books. would you stop your kids from reading Lord of the Rings or something because there is violence?

    entertainment is entertainment: the violence level hasnt changed, just the delivery. there is no proven correlation between people playing violent video games or watching violent movies and actually committing acts of violence. its a myth perpetrated by people from past generations who can adapt to new things and dont put the effort into actually understanding what they are. this same attitude is what fueled the utterly retarded panics surrounding such innocuous things like harry Potter and Pokemon. its just a case of “I donʻt understand it, therefore it must be bad”. and thatʻs the attitude im getting from you.

    this same unwillingness to understand is why we have to constantly fight back against willfuly ignorant gun grabbers.

    also, millions upon millions of gamers play these violent video games every day. the only reason they are connected with some shooters is simply because they exist. its like blaming a shooting on bicycles because the killer happened to love mountain biking. its an extremely popular hobby, of COURSE some killers will enjoy it. hell, games are now more popular than tv in the 18-34 age demographic. its simply a case of coincidence since there is so much of it out there.

    • “Violent movies and video games are no different than violence in books.”

      You CANNOT be serious! Unless your violent novels depict visible brutality and gore, you are WAY too full of yourself.

      EVERYBODY knows there’s a big difference. Even you.

      • What about a play. Maybe one where the protagonist kills his father, has sex with his mother, then cuts his own eyes out.
        Or maybe a play where senators brutally stab the president to death on the steps of the capital?
        Then there was that play where a host stabs his guest to death and his wife can’t get the blood off her hands.
        OOOo how about a play filled with teenage sex, murder and suicide?
        Are those all so different? Or do you just not have much imagination?

        I don’t know about you, but there was a time when all of those plays were read by high school students.

    • Yes there’s a large difference between seeing and hearing, accompanied by visual and auditory stimuli, and just reading a book. Then you say there’s no “proven correlation”? Correlation aren’t proven in the first place, however, there is a higher link (positive correlation) between television and violence than there is between smoking and cancer, so i’m of the opinion that you don’t know what you’re talking about. Centerwall’s study showed an extreme increase in aggression after the introduction of television violence into a isolated community.

      I’m of the opinion that violence in movies and games are a great catalyst for aggression and violence when a buffer, such as a stable home life, is not present or if the viewer has a mental disorder. However, I don’t believe it’s our duty to tell people what they can or cannot watch. Million of stable people can enjoy television, film, and video games, without ever having violent outbursts that these may initiate in a troubled person.

  7. I personally think that video was awesome and I shared it out to all of my FB friends last night. Most of the “likes” came from (gasp) people who are generally liberal.

    Just for the sake of argument… If anyone wants to tackle the issue of surrogate violence inducing testosterone surges, irrational behavior, and violence, they will have to start with NFL football and the fan culture surrounding it. Admittedly, not as bad as soccer hooliganism in Europe, but it is nonetheless the USA’s number one tribal-violence surrogate for redirecting our impulses to go beat the stuffing out of that other tribe which competes with us for resources.

    No? No takers? Then shut up and let me enjoy my exciting movies filled with sex, violence, and drama. Which, I might add, I am exposed to for far fewer hours per year than NFL fans spend watching their entertainment.

    Not attacking NFL fans – just pointing out that we clearly have a need for surrogate violence to help us sublimate our urges to form up into raiding parties and go pillaging, and that this includes far more than just movies and video games.

    • “No? No takers? Then shut up and let me enjoy my exciting movies filled with sex, violence, and drama. ”

      No takers, maybe because others see your depiction of NFL football as “violent” and “irrational” as vastly overstated.

      No one, with the possible exception of your mother, is going to try and put a halt to your “enjoyment”. Presumably you are a responsible adult. Knock yourself out. It’s a “free country”.

    • soccer hooliganism doesn’t really require soccer – it’s just a way of setting up the teams of hooligans and a fight schedule

  8. So your saying the NFL encourages mass shootings when they run up and down a grass lawn with applied white stripes while holding a small synthetic spheroid shaped object?

    • I’m going to assume that was directed to me.

      No, the opposite. The NFL, movies, video games… They all provide a safe outlet for our urge for tribal violence, aka “form up into a group and go beat the stuffing out of some other group that’s not of our tribe”. Without these pressure-relief valves there would be a lot more people snapping and committing mayhem and violence when their repressed urges overpowered their efforts to be good members of society.

  9. Even if Hollywood violence, violent video games, etc., can be proven to result in violent behavior demonstrated in Spree Killers, there shouldn’t be any legislative action taken to censor them; there should be encouragement of BETTER PARENTING. Is that such an incomprehensible idea?

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