“As one of the premier builders of quality rifles today, Turnbull Mfg. Co. is pleased to announce their latest project, a carbon steel 308 semi-automatic rifle chambered in 7.625x51mm/.308 Winchester.” Full marks for self-confidence. But you still have to ask: what sets the $5k TAR-10 apart from its lesser-priced rivals? The TAR-10 308 is a gas operated semi-auto that locks with a rotating bolt. The rifle comes with both a 10 round and a 4 round detachable magazine.” So far, so SCAR. “Unlike any other AR style rifle, the TAR-10 is built of steel and color case hardened using Turnbull’s proprietary finish. The receiver is made from a 8620 billet, with the upper and lower halves attached in the AR style. The upper receiver has a built-in high rise picatinny rail sight platform, eliminating the need for special scope risers. The pistol grip, buttstock and forend are American walnut and sling swivels are standard.” Aha! They’ve got wood! Do you, for the TAR-10? Features and specs after the jump.

Features & Specifications

_ .308 Win/7.62 NATO
_ Overall length is 38.25″
_ 16.5″ fluted 4150 chrome moly-vanadium barrel with screw on muzzle brake
_ Rifling: 1 turn in 10″ [25.4cm]; R.H. twist/6 grooves & lands
_ 13 lbs without magazine
_ Carbine gas system for smoother felt recoil
_ Premium American Walnut forend, pistol grip
_ Color case hardened steel lower and flat top upper with high picatinny rail
_ MOE ™ trigger guard for gloved finger
_ Turnbull Mfg. Co. uses DPMS & Bushmaster barrels and other components in this AR
_ Ships in lockable hard case with operator’s safety manual and 4 and 10 round magazines
_ Photograph shows optional scope
_ MSRP is $4,995.

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25 Responses to New from Turnbull: .308 TAR-10

  1. This might be the first and last time in history you see Magpul and color case hardened in the specs together!

  2. The wood stock is interesting, and I can see there being a market for that, despite that wood is inferior. But the steel on the lower receiver adds nothing except the potential to rust and a lot of weight.

  3. When I see that all I can think of it as is a “pre-ban” investment. If modern home sporting home defense rifles are ever banned again, a rare specimen like that will one day demand a huge premium. A steel M16 (a little more than a hundred are registered) receiver demands a premium today.

    • Is the number that low for steel M16 lowers? A family member bought a Group Ind steel M16 lower right before the 86 ban, are these the same ones?

  4. Very cool, but I would much rather have their Winchester Model 1886 repro. That is only 2650.00……….

  5. If I wanted a steel-and-wood semi-auto rifle in .308 Win, I’d go with a nice FAL or M1A. But I’ve been down that path several times in the past decade, and I’m currently much happier with AR10-pattern rifles.

    That being said, props to Turnbull for doing something unique.

  6. Personally I find that thing hideous. I loves me some wood and color case hardening (which is extremely well done by Turnbull) but those two on this platform grinds so many gears it ain’t funny. I’ve never considered myself an ardent traditionalist but in this case I may be guilty.

    I also don’t understand the benefit of steel receivers. Aluminum alloy has been more than proved to be durable and aside from steel being able to be case hardened I see only a weight penalty. Then again, this is more of a showpiece than anything and I’m probably being too critical of it. I think I just went full circle.

  7. Straight outta Firefly.

    The metallurgist in me asks if 8620 is REALLY necessary though. That’s like using a combine to mow your lawn.

    • 8620 is a very good alloy for case hardening, or color case hardening.

      Casing a higher carbon steel (eg, 4140) can result in the steel being hardened clear through, which is counter-indicated.

  8. I don’t mind the looks of the typical AK type rifle, because it’s a reliable tool, well designed for what it does. This looks like an attempt to pretty up a fat girl for a wedding. This much attention paid to a classic Winchester, or Remington falling block rifle would be gorgious, but just doesn’t work here in my opinion.

  9. As soon as I read “high carbon steel” I thought “I bet that things heavy.” Then, when I read “American Walnut” furniture I thought “Jebus, that thing must be a tank.” I was right. 13 lbs empty? That’s ridiculous. A 20 round mag of .308 is over a pound and a half. Assuming it’s actually 13.something lbs empty, that makes this rifle ~15lbs loaded. Does it come with a Sherpa to carry it?

  10. All Abord The SteamPunk Train!

    It’s what they call a “Personal Vision”, meaning that no one else will want one, let alone buy it.
    However I can see it in use on a (Hoped for) remake of Firefly

  11. I like it. I love the wood stock. Plastic stocks break. Never saw a wooden stock break. Many people have been beaten to death with wood stocks. Sniper rifles at one time were all wooden stocks. I have broken plastic stocks. It cost a lot but it is a nice weapon. But why not by a m1a match rifle from Springfield armory?

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