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7 Responses to Flexors Overdominant? Jess Banda Can Help With That

  1. Forearm strength can make a difference in speed and accuracy, especially as you move away from plinking rounds to self defense loads. If you’ve ever been out of shape and taken an all day or two day class where you practice numerous times and draw and shoot over 500 rounds, you know that strong forearms make a difference. Doing exercises for both the flexors and extensors is called for unless you are a skilled craftsman who uses hand tools on a daily basis. Stretching the flexors while strengthening the extensors, as in the video, will help stave off tendonitis, especially in OFWGs, who are prone to that type of tendonitis. That’s why you see so many guys on the Senior PGA tour wearing those forearm straps. It’s just like stretching your calves and strengthening your shin extensors helps prevent the tendonitis referred to as heel spurs.

  2. I know precisely jack about working out, but that made a lot of sense to me, and I’m going to try to put it into use, just to help increase my control of recoil.

  3. Big thanks to the truthaboutguns.com for helping me spread the word/video. Numerous firearms enthusiasts believe forearm pain is something they must endure, when it’s actually a simple fix.
    KWAL, you’re absolutely correct! A strong grip can not only prevent injuries and discomfort, but can help you maximize your ammo budget by managing recoil and therefore improving accuracy.
    In my article “Get A Grip,” in the Sept 2010 issue of SWAT Magazine, I shared 2 training programs for improving your grip, not only fo recoil management, but for weapon retention. In emails I received from readers, the training program really assisted those shooting snappier rounds, such as the 40S&W.

  4. My chiropractor recommended the second set of exercises.

    Some folks recommended getting rid of the .460 Smith and Wesson – but that ain’t gonna happen.

    • Accur81, great to hear you won’t be selling your .460S&W. Most people would’ve chosen the “easier path” of living with the pain, rather than taking an active part in their recovery.

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