There’s no real downside to home carry. Safety first. As long as you put your Home Carry gun in a safe when you’re showering or answering the call of nature, the weapon is always under your control. In terms of ergonomics, there are a huge number of gun and holster options that are comfortable and (if you wish) discreet. Second, Home Carry saves lives. While I don’t have a specific anecdote handy to back-up that premise, common sense may suffice. During a home invasion, an owner practicing Home Carry has a gun where and when they need it. No footrace to the safe. Alternatively, how about an example where the lack of a Home Carry weapon leads to tragedy . . .

Scott Feldkamp rushed to protect his 83-year-old father when he saw a knife-wielding intruder attack him inside the family’s Marengo home, but Feldkamp was stabbed repeatedly during the struggle.

The 54-year-old Feldkamp still managed to stagger upstairs, grab a 9mm handgun, then lean over a stair railing and gun down Doran Bloom [above], a neighbor with a history of psychiatric problems, including “episodes of rage,” McHenry County Sheriff Keith Nygren said.

Despite Feldkamp’s efforts, his father, John “Jack” Feldkamp died in the Tuesday night attack, as did his mother, 81-year-old Audrey Feldkamp — whom police said was stabbed 14 times by Bloom after he entered their rural, upscale home.

The main argument against Home Carry: who needs it? The odds of a home invasion like the one chronicled by suntimes.com are so low as to make someone packing heat at home look like someone suffering from paranoid delusions. Speaking of which . . .

The bizarre attack that left the 27-year-old Bloom dead and Scott Feldkamp severely injured appeared to be “a random incident of violence” committed by a mentally disturbed man, police said Wednesday.

“We can find no motive for this,” Nygren said. “This clearly appears to be a random incident of violence aimed at these victims for no particular reason.”

Yup, worst case scenario. So . . . you puts your gun in a safe, you takes your chances. You strap it on your hip, you lower your odds of needing a gun and not having one, in the place where your most precious assets shelter. Go figure.

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34 Responses to Home Carry Saves Lives

  1. Due to my lifestyle and particular dwelling, home carry or at least having one gun accessible is effectively zero risk and zero inconvenience so I see no reason not to. If I had a mess visitors all the time I’d be a little more conservative and probably CC on my person instead.

    Also, lock your doors folks, all the time, in or out.

    -D

  2. Poor guy. I home carry quite a lot now, but I sure as hell hope nothing like this ever happens to me or anybody else I know.

  3. Or you could just… lock your doors.

    A man’s home is his castle. The point of having a castle is that it provides some measure of security. If you’re paying for a castle, and still living like a pilgrim instead of a king, you’re not getting full value for your money.

    • Even a King, with his castle moat and high walls, still has his sword and guards. No keep is impenetrable.

    • Who is to say those doors on this home were locked? And if they were what was to stop this guy? He suffered from ‘rage’ (right!). I think he is more then capable of kicking in a door. I know I am. A notch in a piece of two by four with some thin steel (if you are lucky) around it and we call that a dead bolt. Good luck keeping any driven intruder out. Gun. Carry. Safer.

      • As the man says, “Well that’s your problem, right there.”

        I like guns, but guns are not the only – or even the best – solution to every problem. You can lock your doors. You can upgrade your doors. You can improve your general security in other ways. If after all that you still want to carry a gun around the house, there’s no reason you can’t. But you’ll also have the option of enjoying your castle without a hunk of metal on your person at all times.

        • “Jason says:

          June 9, 2011 at 7:22 PM

          As the man says, “Well that’s your problem, right there.”

          I like guns, but guns are not the only – or even the best – solution to every problem. You can lock your doors. You can upgrade your doors. You can improve your general security in other ways. If after all that you still want to carry a gun around the house, there’s no reason you can’t. But you’ll also have the option of enjoying your castle without a hunk of metal on your person at all times.”

          I like guns too. I also agree that guns are not the solution to every problem. I do lock my doors. I have upgraded them as well. They have nice steel decorative plates on the inside and out that prevent crowbar action from doing a thing. I have improved my general security. All my windows are sealed with decorative window gratings with nice flower baskets hanging from them. And yes, you are right. There is no reason you can’t improve security. Barring someone with money issues. Know any? I do. My entire house has perimeter alarms and security. Don’t forget the spots!

          So to summarized: I have a well sealed home. A well lit yard. An active warning system against intrusion. Oh! And a sidearm if all that fails.

          I enjoy my castle. I enjoy it as much as the neighborhood I live in allows. Me and my family are moving to a much better area in a few weeks so that cuts down on the crime issue. I will still carry as that is my want and desire. I will continue on farther with my home carry as that is my assurance.

          To each their own, Jason. What you find uncomfortable, I find comfortable.

        • That’s certainly your privilege, but you’re in the distinct minority. Most people do not enjoy having to maintain the same level of readiness while living in their own home that they would need living on the street in a bad part of town. Most of us have homes to provide a place of refuge and relaxation. If your home does not provide that for you, then I feel some pity for you. The same pity I would feel for a homeless person. No, more. Their fear is unfortunate, but entirely rational. Yours is primarily self-inflicted.

  4. Thank you for this write-up RF. I live in McHenry County. It is pretty quiet with only a few home invasions over the past decade. It is hard to make the case to my wife that I should carry at home, but you have given me more “ammunition” for my argument. When it comes down to it, there are those folks like my lovely wife that ask, “when will you need it?” And then there are folks like me that ask, “what if you need it?”

  5. I have a buddy in Mexico, and someone he knew was killed by a gang that broke into his house and spent several MINUTES taunting him killing him, and he couldn’t do anything about it. I’m still in the process of shaking off the mind-screw I got from that story.

  6. I just recently acquired my CCW but so far have only occasionally carried and haven’t carried at home.

    Part of my hang-up is lifestyle versus risk. We make the tradeoffs all the time. Maybe we take some medication that might increase the risk of X but we take it anyhow since it improves our lives.

    I am a pretty avid cyclist and I can’t see packing under my spandex. At least a gun anyhow. I’m probably more at risk from a road raging driver since I don’t have metal around me and I can’t escape very easily. But, carrying would be pretty uncomfortable (I think) and would reduce the pleasure I get from the activity. My current calculus is to make the tradeoff in terms of not carrying.

    At home, it’s kind of the same thing. I can’t find a way to carry that is so comfortable that I would want to do it all day, every day. If I lived in a high risk area I might consider otherwise.

    • Obviously you haven’t investigated concealed carry holsters very well. It is common for a cyclist to wear a waist pack or fanny pack as they are commonly called. I used to wear one while on my bicycle before concealed carry just so I would have a place to carry my wallet, keys, etc. Now they make specialty fanny packs for concealed carry – a fitted place to carry a handgun, as well as having separate compartments for wallet and keys. I wear one whenever I cycle, it looks like it goes with the activity, is very comfortable and doesn’t interfere with cycling,. and I have the ability to
      defend myself against a road-rager, large dog, or anyone else who wants to hurt me.

  7. Just yesterday my habit of always having my S & W 340 PD (or my Glock 26 or 27) in my pocket at all times-including home, paid off. I had just let my Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Piggy, and my Wolf/St. Bernard, Odin, out into the backyard. A few seconds later my visiting mother shouted for me. My little Piggy had cornered a 5-6′ water moccasin in the back yard. We are in a drought here with scorching temperatures. I was already at Piggy’s side when I realized she well may be bit. Out of instinct I pushed her aside as I drew my Smith and fired, letting Mr. Cottonmouth know what an Extreme Shock .357 Fang Face round felt like. It was all over for him instantly. Had I not been packing as usual, my pup may have well been bit. I know personally that crime can strike just as quickly and unexpectedly. My Kramer and my Desantis (for the Glock 26/27) Pocket holsters are worth their weight in gold.

    • Cujo, I live in the St. Louis area, and the other night the local news had a story about water moccasin moving into residential areas because of the floods. At the end of the story (which was about harm to pets), they mentioned it was illegal to kill a water moccasins, they never said if it was still illegal if you were protecting your self or your pets. Now Missouri does have a castle doctrine/stand your ground protections, but not sure if it covers snakes. And yes I home carry, in fact everywhere carry.

  8. We’ll probably never talk you (Jason) into home carry – I’m down with that. It its my sincere hope that you never get the opportunity to prove the proponents of home carry wrong or, more importantly, right.

    However, it seems you’ve found a way to comfortably CC outside your home. How much of a stretch would it be to continue that at home? If it is strictly a comfort thing, could your carry method be modified? Different holster/location?

    Just food for thought. No animosity intended.

    • When I’m out in public, I carry my gun in my pants. But one of the things I buy when I pay a mortgage is the privilege of going without pants and not getting arrested. If a man can’t sit on the couch, drinking beer and watching TV in his boxers, what’s it all for?

      It’s like the old joke about the old guy who goes to his doctor, and his doctor tells him, “You’re in bad shape. You need to stop smoking, drinking, eating red meat, and associating with loose women.” And the man replies, “Doc, the whole reason I come to you is to get treatment that will allow me to keep doing those things!”

      The point of medicine is to let you keep living and enjoying your life. The point of guns is to let you keep living and enjoying your life. My guns are tools to support my lifestyle. Not the other way around.

  9. i like the idea of home carry, but i don’t really know where i would start. Could i use my g17 around the house or does carry inside my house require CCW? the idea of answering the door for the ups man with a full sized glock on my hip seems problematic as they would probably freak out. as would lugging my Arsenal ak around the house. I’ve also been considering a g23 for my next purchase, should this be my weapon of choice?

    • You have the right to keep and bear arms on your own property anywhere in these here United States, and you can’t be charged with brandishing in your own home unless you threaten someone with a gun. Note: people freak less than you imagine. And be sure to check your local laws for any conditions of ownership and possession, especially if you live in Chicago or Washington, D.C.

      I wear a Ruger SP101 in a Ramora IWB holster or a Glock 30 in a OWB holster (at least until my G30 compatible Crossbreed Supertuck Deluxe arrives). I just throw my shirt over the gun when the postman rings (twice). The J-frame Smith is another option. Bodyguard reviews to follow.

      • This is true, Robert. People do freak less then we imagine. We had a realtor in our home this morning and he watched without a blink as I holstered my gun after tucking my shirt. His only question was if it was heavy. I wanted to talk more about the gun (as it is my interest) but he was right to work on what needed to be changed, enhanced and removed to give the home ‘buyer appeal’.

      • Robert, I don’t know if the Crossbreed for your G30 will be your first, but if it is, you will be amazed. I’ve touted these holsters here for awhile, and no I have no affiliation with the company, but unless I’m sleeping or bathing it’s always on. In fact I went to the driving range last week ( and being disabled, that’s not easy), but after a small bucket, I realized I still had my Tuarus609 on in my Crossbreed holster, and it did not interfere at all. Almost in every situation, it has gotten to the point where I don’t even know I’m wearing a gun, but I know where it is at all times in every situation. Especially in the car with my seatbelt on, I can still access the weapon. Hope you have as much luck and comfort with yours, as I did with both of mine.

  10. “Jason says:

    June 10, 2011 at 1:43 AM

    That’s certainly your privilege, but you’re in the distinct minority. Most people do not enjoy having to maintain the same level of readiness while living in their own home that they would need living on the street in a bad part of town. Most of us have homes to provide a place of refuge and relaxation. If your home does not provide that for you, then I feel some pity for you. The same pity I would feel for a homeless person. No, more. Their fear is unfortunate, but entirely rational. Yours is primarily self-inflicted.”

    Am I in the distinct minority? I don’t think I am. No, most people do not enjoy the same level of readiness. Most would be false in their securities, to say the least. I have a home to provide me with a place of refuge and relaxation. The difference is that my home ‘actually’ is a refuge, in both the temporal and the physical. Again, most peoples security is imaginary. My home does provide all these things for me, more so then most peoples homes I would be willing to bet, again, both temporal and physical.

    Pity is fine. Just don’t expect me to reciprocate. Most people of ‘imagined’ refuge have it for those they deem paranoid (yet The News is a bustling business somehow – weird!). The Bubble has claimed many.

    I have no fear. That is one thing we surely can disagree on. At least in regards to me and my homes ability to keep my family safe. It is outside the home that you could maybe call me fearful, and rarely so as I know what to avoid and where not to go in town. But outside you could call me no more fearful then any other man who has a family to care for.

    The long and short of it is, I rely on ‘all’ the tools I have laid out for my families’ protection. While I will react and ,God willing, do favorably in the ‘imagined’ situation that never happens (despite the rampant crime reports for this city – what do victims know?) I find it safe to say that you will be winding up a lock and trying to think of the combo as your world unravels. All because you don’t have a comfy holster.

    As a side note: Never mind that pesky gun you have (for some reason) when you head off hiking or biking into bear country. Chances are you won’t be attacked. No worries.

  11. I live in Ohio which is a “shall issue” State. We also have the Right to open carry (a loaded gun for those of you from California) without a license. I have a concealed carry license. The gun goes on when I get up and comes off when I go to bed. I have OWB and IWB holsters. I also have a fanny -pack designed to carry a gun. I usually carry concealed, but sometimes open carry works better. With Ohio’s laws, you can not be stopped or detained just for open carrying. A couple of police departments found this out the hard way.

  12. I think Jason’s points make sense for his situation and his advice on improving the overall security of our homes is spot on. No problems here. I home carry most of the time or at least have one within easy reach. I have been carrying so long now that the added weight doesn’t even register on my mind. The same will happen to you as well, Jason, once you have carried long enough. You just have to give it a little time. Once you start carrying, there is an initial awkwardness about it. It is something you are not used to doing so you feel a bit strange at first. Stick with it. Carry everywhere all the time. Be committed to being prepared. If you do, the awkwardness will soon pass and your handgun will feel as natural on your side as any other piece of clothing. There are also some very good small, lightweight handguns out there now that allow you to be secure in almost any place and any situation. It has taken years of saving and planning but I now have enough high quality handguns and holsters to be able to effectively conceal one anytime, anywhere.

    Cheers,

    jk

    • “jk says:

      June 10, 2011 at 6:10 PM

      I think Jason’s points make sense for his situation and his advice on improving the overall security of our homes is spot on.”

      This is true. The issue arises when folks claim that others are living in fear when they have no idea where others live or the crime situation in the area. They do not see it, therefore, all others are living in imagined fear. From there it pretty much becomes another person spouting shit in this psycho-babble, Dr. Phil age of wisdom.

  13. Home carry is the epitome of that paranoia you guys think is normal. I find it fascinatiing that some of you who feel paranoid enough to carry a concealed gun when going to the supermarket, feel it’s going too far to do so in the home. And I love that Robert has no examples of home carry saving the day, only ones in which it MIGHT have helped. But, I don’t expect that to last. Soon, we’ll see a case of home-carry murder of a burglar, or something of that nature. I’ll bet we see it here first, but if I happen to stumble upon it before you, I’ll let you know.

  14. Whose lives did the gun save? At the end everyone, even Scott and Doran are dead… its more accurate in this case to say guns kill people who kill people… all the gun did was kill Doran, not save Jack or Audrey or Scott… so again, whose life did the gun save?

    • The point is that no one in the house was practicing home carry. Feldkamp had to go upstairs to retrieve a handgun. If he had the handgun on him, precious moments may have spared all but the assailant.

      • I see what you mean except Jack would have been dead regardless…had already been stabbed before son saw…Knew them all except Scott the son…Truly a sad story that I’m not sure guns would have solved

        • I think the solution is more mental health services but we can both agree that this was an unnecessary tragedy and a waste of human life…

        • I agree. Out of the two prisons and two jails I worked, the most violent fights I had were the mentally ill-who really belonged elsewhere.

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