Tag: William C. Montgomery

Question of the Day II: Is Gun Control a Tenet of Christianity?

Is gun control a religious issue? More pointedly, it is a tenant of Christianity? Brady Campaign Against Gun Violence president Paul Helmke, Republican former mayor of Fort Wayne, Indiana, says that for him it is. Since the interview took place on PBS’s Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, a program that that I’m sure nobody in America actually watches, click here for the transcript. “[Gun control] does fit into my religious tradition,” Helmke says. “I went to a Lutheran grade school growing up. We talked about nonviolence. The story of the garden of Gethsemane is put down that sword…

continue reading

Richard Cohen: “It’s the gun that did it.”

Wooly Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen weighed in on the Tucson shooting that resulted in the death of U.S. District Judge John Roll and five others during a botched assassination attempt of Rep. Gabby Giffords.  In a stunning feat of logical contortion, Cohen, who looks like the spawn of an unholy union between David Letterman and Wolf Blitzer, equates the tragedy to the discovery of America.  America, he says, was not discovered by Columbus.  It was discovered by the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria.  Really. I’m not kidding…

continue reading

Editorial: Deconstructing Kellermann

While a student many, many moons ago I worked as the secretary of a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Although my responsibilities were strictly clerical, I observed a thing or two about what happens behind the ivory walls of academia’s most sacred towers. While we prefer to think of all scientists as infallible servants of humanity, as indeed some are, many are corrupted by the same vices that plague, say, auto journalism: money, power, pride, and politics. Others are simply blinded by emotion. And yet many anti-gun advocates are quick to tout any study—no matter how flawed—as long as it agrees with their core beliefs. A recent post on Mikeb302000 featured this golden oldie: Gun Ownership As A Risk Factor For Homicide In The Home by Dr. Arthur L Kellermann, et al, circa 1993.  Let’s take a look…

continue reading

Book Review: Colonel Roosevelt by Edmund Morris

 

 Perhaps no other American president was a better embodiment of the people he represented than Theodore Roosevelt.  Roosevelt was a tough self-made man who ran a Dakota cattle ranch during the days of the Wild West.  He was bellicose speaker and notorious hunter.  But there was more to the man than a cartoon persona of burly weight-lifter’s physique, walrus mustache, and snapping choppers.   He was an intellect without equal among his fellow office holders, with the possible exception of Thomas Jefferson.  He is the only sitting president to have earned a Nobel Peace Prize.  His public policies were nuanced and he was a tender-hearted husband and father.  In Colonel Roosevelt, biographer Edmund Morris explores the final, often violent, years of the former president’s life.

continue reading

TTAG Commentator JadeGold: gun rights “arguments are largely fraudulent”

Commentator JadeGold posted a comment to RF’s post Gun Control Is Alive and Well and Living at Sharon High School, wherein she accuses gun rights activists of relying on “fraudulent” arguments. JadeGold cites six specific examples from an allegedly endless list of erroneous pro-gun claims. Is it true? Do those of us that embrace gun rights live in a fraudulent fantasy world? JadeGold has utilized the rhetorical devise known as straw man argument. She has provided an exaggerated and distorted version of what gun rights advocates believe so that she can then knock those fabricated claims down. Because her straw man arguments fail to address the actual beliefs of gun rights advocates, her arguments are fallacious. Let’s examine these claims one at a time.

continue reading

Leaving Home – Chapter 13 – Neptunus Rex

I was on my stomach with my hands and feet hogtied behind my back. The supply locker in which I was imprisoned was just narrower than I was tall from my knees to the top of my head. The pirates had shoved me in so that my head was lower than the rest of my body. Although my head was still covered by my pillowcase and a sock crammed into my mouth, my face was pressed so closely against a wetsuit that I could smell and taste the rubber. I wiggled and tried to crawl with my shoulders to reposition enough to gain a measure of comfort. The equatorial heat closed in on me in the airless compartment and my breathing became labored. Sweat soon lubricated the neoprene and my body slipped back into the original torturous position.

continue reading