D.C. Gun Laws: Testing the Limits

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Some kids are bright enough to look at a stove top, see the flame or the glowing coil and think “Hot!” and forget about touching it. Others just gotta touch it, in order to figure out that when you play with fire you get burned. I’m predicting that the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia and the D.C. City Council will find out that fire = hot = get burned, just as soon as their “assault weapons/hi-cap magazine” ban gets a ticket to a command performance by the Supremes.

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[HTML1] Some kids are bright enough to look at a stove top, see the flame or the glowing coil and think “Hot!” and forget about touching it. Others just gotta…

“A weapon’s proximity to narcotics may be sufficient to provide the nexus necessary to enhance a defendant’s sentence”

That’s the legal precedent cited by the U.S. Court of Appeals in rejecting Isaac Serrano’s appeal. Mr. Serrano’s lawyer argued that the guns found in his client’s Ogden, Utah home had nothing to do with his coke dealing. Therefore, their discovery shouldn’t ratchet up his sentence for purveying nose candy. There’s some funny stuff here, relative to a handgun that couldn’t possibly have had anything to do with a criminal enterprise—because it was falling apart. “Mr. Serrano notes that the weapons’ ‘diminutive size and poor functioning condition’ suggested little utility as a tool for either intimidating customers or protecting himself. He points out that rifles are more typically associated with hunting.” IGB (It Gets Better). (more…)

That’s the legal precedent cited by the U.S. Court of Appeals in rejecting Isaac Serrano’s appeal. Mr. Serrano’s lawyer argued that the guns found in his client’s Ogden, Utah home…

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