Confederate Revolvers: Thomas W. Cofer

Guns made by Portsmouth, Virginia-based Thomas W. Cofer are some of the rarest examples of Confederate revolvers. Based on the Whitney Navy, estimates put total production numbers somewhere between 86 and 140; less than 10 are known to exist today. The biggest visual differentiation between the Whitney and Cofer revolvers is that Cofer’s gun features […]

Confederate Revolvers: J. H. Dance & Brothers

Revolvers made by Dance are some of the most distinctive guns to come out of the south. While they are copied from the Colt Dragoon, they differ in a very important aspect of appearance. Dance revolvers lack a recoil shield on both sides of the gun, giving their frame a very flat look. Made in […]

Confederate Revolvers: Spiller and Burr

The Spiller and Burr factory was originally established in Richmond, Virginia, as the brainchild of wealthy businessmen Edward Spiller and David Burr, along with firearms expert James Burton. Burr was a southern sympathizer running a commission business in Baltimore, Maryland; Spiller was born and raised in Richmond where he made steam engines and locomotives. Burton […]

Confederate Revolvers: Griswold and Gunnison

Before the Civil War, Samuel Griswold was a successful businessman, having found a good living making cotton gins. Business was so good that he purchased 4,000 acres outside of Macon, Georgia, where he established and named a town after himself – Griswoldville, Georgia. Arvin Gunnison had worked for Griswold many years before the war started. […]