New Study: How Much Do Finger Placement & Ready Position Matter?

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Republished from a Force Science Institute email blast:

In terms of reacting fast to a sudden deadly threat, does it matter how you carry an unholstered or unslung weapon or where you rest your trigger finger before making the decision to shoot? In other words, does any one of the various ready positions commonly taught in police firearms training really give you a significant edge in response time? A two-part study by the Force Science Institute reported in the current issue of the peer-reviewed journal Law Enforcement Executive Forum provide some answers that may surprise you if you’re a strong advocate for particular positioning . . .

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I’ve Been Carrying and Training All Wrong

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By Aaron McVay via concealednation.org

I’ll be the first to admit, I’m far from perfect. My wife would tell you otherwise as she tells me I have a complex where I think I’m always right. Where does that come from? It comes from my insane character trait of wanting to know everything about a subject I care about. Buying a new car? I know most of the nitty gritty details about how much horsepower and torque the new X model has or the new Y model will have. Why? I don’t know. I just care about it so I absorb it. So why then, if I look for so much information on topics I care about have I been going about firearm training and carrying practices incorrectly for all these years? I’ll admit it. I train wrong and I’ve been carrying wrong. It felt comfortable so I stuck with it and I didn’t want to get outside of my comfort zone, so I never changed . . .

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Making the Most of Your Range Time

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By Brian P.

I have precious little time to hit the range. Ring a bell? Three kids, five day a week work week with an hour commute, and a wife who rotates weekends every third while I rotate weekends every fourth. Needless to say… things don’t always permit a range day. When I do get out, I want to make the most of my time and I don’t want to be stopped. I have a few tips to share that will help readers stay put at the range even if the weather turns fowl, and some that will keep you productive so when you can get out to shoot you’re actually pulling the trigger more . . .

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How to Hone Your Double-Action Trigger Pull

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By Constantine via concealednation.org

Trigger control is one of the fundamental elements of shooting. Combined with grip, stance, sight alignment and breathing, you must master trigger control to shoot accurately, quickly, and with confidence. If you carry a double-action revolver, DA/SA semi-auto, or DAO semi-auto, you will have a trigger which is long and heavy compared to the single-action pull on a 1911 or Hi-Power. With the traditional double action pistol, the first pull is the long DA variety, followed by the shorter, lighter SA pull when the hammer is cocked. The key to good DA trigger control is minimal disturbance of the sight alignment from beginning to end. Even when “point shooting” at very close range . . .

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What’s Wrong With This Picture: Grab Your Gun and FIRE!

I’m not a police officer. I did a brief stint as a reserve officer but I never had a close-quarters combat situation. So I may not be the best person to say that this technique – grabbing your pistol with your off-hand to avoid a gun grab – is insane. But I reckon it’s nuts. The difference between shooting your hand and not shooting your hand is nowhere NEAR enough to give you a reasonable chance of not shooting your hand. Especially when . . .

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TTAG Podcast: Nick and Tyler Talking Texas, Guns, and the GLOCK 43

I just flew into Atlanta to meet Tyler and another one of our buddies for a weekend of fun with guns. As we had some time to kill before heading out to the farm we decided to go get some chicken and waffles at Gladys Knight’s Chicken and Waffles in Hotlanta. On the way we started talking about our favorite topic: guns. Since we haven’t done one of these podcasts in a while, we decided to record the entire thing and put it up for your listening enjoyment.

Also, the podcast is BACK! Click here for more information on how to automatically get the latest episodes.

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Guns for Beginners: When You Can Shoot Someone

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Your legal right to use deadly force (i.e. shoot someone) varies from state to state. This article gives you some basic guidelines on the legal use of deadly force. What you are about to read is not legal advice. I am not a lawyer. After you finish here, Google “deadly force YOUR STATE HERE” and read your state’s law. If you have any questions or concerns, contact your local NRA chapter. Take a Use of Deadly Force class. Do not call the police. Just as they have no legal obligation to protect you (true story) they have no legal obligation to give you accurate legal advice. OK, so, we begin with another disclaimer . . .

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Guns for Beginners: Three Must-Have Gunfighting Techniques

As I pointed out in Three Things Every Concealed Carrier Should Carrya gun, a comfortable holster and a phone are the basic tools you need for daily concealed carry. Sort those out and you’re good to stow. As for “gun fighting skills,” once again, this article is aimed at newbies. People who need to be gently led into the world of armed self-defense. If you’ve already mastered these skills, please share the following advice with beginners. Here are three must-have gunfighting techniques . . .

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Point Shooting vs. Sighted Shooting: Which Do You Use?

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By Jeff Lehman via wideopenspaces.com

“Always use your sights.”  “There is a reason there are sights on your gun.” “Focus on your front sight.” 

We hear these things all the time in various classes or on the range, and there’s no denying it is important to use the sights on your gun. But are there times when not using your sights is acceptable? Should you ever just point your gun at the target and pull the trigger? . . .

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Contractor Loses His Pistol Because…Off-Body Carry

A building contractor who was renovating rooms at an extended-stay hotel in Columbia, Tennessee had his pistol taken from an unsecured toolbox while he was working, reports Kara Coleman in The Daily Herald, and so far, it doesn’t sound like he’s gotten it back. “The contractor, Donnie Rosenbaum, said an unloaded Keltic (sic) .380-caliber pistol (hey, at least she got the caliber right) was in his unsecured toolbox in his room at the motel on Nashville Highway, according to a Columbia Police Department report. Rosenbaum’s son said he saw one of Rosenbaum’s employees take the handgun because Rosenbaum’s 13-year-old nephew was present and he did not want the teen having access to it.” . . .

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Diversity in the Gun Culture: A View From Behind the Line

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By Travis Pike

A a NRA-ordained firearms instructor I have had the ability to really see the diversity in gun ownership. I’ve also gotten to see a surprising amount of anti-gun sentiment. I also get lasered a lot and the profit margins are basically nonexistent so you better just enjoy teaching. But the purpose here isn’t to point out the flaws and idiosyncrasies of being a firearms trainer; the topic is the diversity in those seeking firearms training. Anecdotes don’t equate to scientific proof, but I can’t be the only firearms trainer out there to notice this trend . . .

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