Category: Question of the Day

Question of the Day: What Is It With Anti-Gunners and Dick Size?

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I kinda get it. Gun control advocates believe that people who carry firearms are mentally-challenged, anti-social, paranoid, trigger-happy vigilantes. The latter characterization assumes that gun carrying citizens are actively looking for trouble. Fantasizing about using their gun to prove their manhood. Why? Because, the antis believe, gun owners feel powerless. Why? Because they have small penises (one per owner, obvs.). That’s a pretty odd logic train, one that starts with an entirely loco locomotive. But this small dick size slur comes up again and again (so to speak) in their attacks on Americans seeking to defend and extend their natural, civil and Constitutionally protected right to keep and bear arms. Why? Why are proponents of civilian disarmament obsessed with dick size?

Question of the Day: Could You Shoot This Target From 1 Mile Away?

Target Is Moving target (not moving but use your imagination) (courtesy target is moving.com)

The above Target is a moving target – which isn’t moving (unless you’re reading this at sea). It stands 16″ tall from the exposed bottom to the tip. The round bit at the top has a six inch diameter. TIM owner Brent Kochuba tells TTAG that he doesn’t [yet] know the exact speed at which the $365 target oscillates. [Click here for their videos.] That said, the company’s press release claims the extended wireless capability TIM target works out to one mile (1609.34m). That would be one hell of a shot. Has the 33-year-old computer engineer attempted it? “No sir. I live in the Northeast . . . We’ve only shot it out to a couple of hundred yards.” Doable at one mile out? What gun and optic would you use? TIM’s sending TTAG two targets to test. I know a place in New Mexico where we can set it up one mile out. So you’re invited! Ping thetruthaboutguns@gmail.com with a pic of your gun (for Facebook). I’ll see about getting Kirsten there as well. Again, if you can’t get here in real life, how would you make this shot?

Question of the Day: What Does Responsible Ownership of an AK-47 Look Like, and Why is it Worth the Potential Risks?

“You can’t kill a stranger with a gun if you don’t have one,” Seattle Times columnist Jerry Large [not shown] opines. “You can’t kill a relative, and you can’t kill a gang rival and you can’t kill yourself with a gun if you don’t have one. You may find some other way to do it, but guns are a most effective killing tool and one that doesn’t offer much service outside of doing bodily injury.” Is Large so small-minded he can’t see the positive aspects of gun ownership? Or is he being willfully blind and maliciously obtuse? Yes! Like so many antis, Large doesn’t “get” guns. In fact, he wants to know, “What does responsible ownership of an AK-47 look like, and why is it worth the potential risks?” Care to educate the man? [We'll send him this link and ask for a reply.]

Question of the Day: What’s Your Worst Range Injury?

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prbrown09 writes:

I went to the range last night and a .380 case pegged my son in the face about 10 feet away from the firing line. It was very weird as most of the brass my friend was slinging was flying at a “normal” arc, rate and distance. The one that hit him came out very hard and punctured his face. I wouldn’t have expected this kind of damage from a small caliber casing – the rim did the damage from impact, rather than a sharp cut from the case. Quick trip to the ER for 5 stitches and he’s all good. Mom’s not very happy, but now the kid has a fun new story to tell. One thing for sure, I will now carry some medical supplies to the range. Have you ever been punctured by a flying case?

Question of the Day: What’s the Most Dangerous Gun in America?

GLOCK 30SF just hanging around (courtesy The Truth About Guns)

Today is Rolling Stone day at TTAG. We’re running three posts (including this one) about the magazine’s onslaught of anti-gun articles. The most ridiculous of these: The 5 Most Dangerous Guns in America. The article claims to ID “the types of guns most often recovered from crime scenes and/or used in murders.” SPOILER ALERT! They are – in order – pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, and derringers. In other words, guns are the most dangerous guns in America. Small ones more than big ones, although really small ones not so much. Well that’s just dumb. So, what firearms are the most dangerous guns in America – to criminals (obviously)? Let’s choose one and base the answer on lethality. All things being equal, what’s the one firearm that bad guys should fear most?

Question of the Day: How Much Do You Trust Your Ballistic BFF?

I’ve done a fair bit of team training. I’ve never had any problem with my partner(s). Of course, we were training; we were all kitted-up and good to go. But what if you’re lazing around home, out and about or cuddled-up asleep with your armed companion – be it a ballistic bro or a gun-glad gal? Birds of a ballistic feather GLOCK together. So are you confident that he/she would make the right decisions in a defensive gun use? Could you work together as a team? Do you have a mutual plan? Spill!

Question of the Day: Is There a Better Way for Open Carry Advocates to Get Their Point Across?

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The recent kerfuffle in the Lone Star State over Open Carry Texas activists and the seminal picture of the “Chipolte ninjas” got me thinking a bit on the OC situation. I’m of the mindset that OC is tactically a bad idea, but I understand that is a heavily debatable topic. I’m fortunate to live in a state where open carry is available to anyone who can legally own a gun. You need a permit to carry concealed, but open carry is unencumbered. That said, I also happen to live near a couple of states that prohibit open carry and, in fact, can prosecute you for brandishing or even assault if one of your fellow citizens so much as sees your gun tucked in its holster. In those states, concealed means concealed and if you accidentally flash someone a view of your holstered gun, you may have problems . . .

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