Cop Fires on Cops After Cops Respond to Shots Fired Domestic Abuse Report

Back in 1991, researcher L.B. Johnson studied domestic violence amongst police officers. Johnson found that 40 percent of police officer families experience domestic violence, as compared to 10 percent of the general population. Regardless of the rate, domestic violence by LEOs is often swept under the rug. Even after a conviction, some 50 percent of abusive cops keep their job. The media’s silent complicity is abhorrent. “Drunk officer gets shot in gun battle with fellow officers” the YouTube headline proclaims, downplaying the domestic abuse component. Was the officer in question jailed for domestic violence and assaulting his brother officers? Nope. But he was suspended without pay. For now. And so it goes . . .

University of South Alabama Campus Cops Write-Up Student for Open Holster Protest (“Engaging in Activities that Threaten the Safety of the Campus Community”)

Universities are developing a reputation for being mini fascist states, only allowing speech that the university administration agrees with, or is considered “politically correct.” The University of South Alabama has lived up to the reputation by citing a student who was peacefully wearing an empty holster in a protest over the universitity’s no weapons policy. The campus policy does not prohibit holsters. The campus police say they cited the student because “someone called it in.” They issued a citation for “engaging in activities that threaten the safety of the campus community” and for a general prohibition on engaging in conduct that violates university rules. In practise, this is a gag on any protest that the administration disagrees with. From campusreform.org . . .

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I’m amazed (but not amused) at the number of police officers who shoot family pets. While some of these shootings are justifiable, many aren’t, robbing law abiding owners of their canine companions and endangering nearby bipeds. The cops misread dog behavior and terminate them with extreme prejudice. Texas has tackled this issue. Since January 1, police officers licensed by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement must attend a four-hour training course on how to handle canine encounters using “nonlethal resources.” Given that America is home to some 70 million pet dogs, the program should be rolled out nationwide. That is all.