Gun Review: SIG SAUER P938

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In recent years there has certainly been no shortage of sub-compact, “pocket-sized” 9mm pistols to choose from. Market demand has spoken, and manufacturers have answered with available products. However, if you’re a “cocked & locked,” hammer-fired kind of a gal (or guy) you’ve been almost completely overlooked. Thankfully, one of the only options out there happens to be a pretty good one — the SIG SAUER P938 . . .

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What Could Possibly Go Wrong: Lamperd Less Lethal Edition

Lamperd Less Lethal revolver (courtesy (lamperdtraining.com)

“You have problems,” lamperdtraining.com asserts, “and Lamperd Less Lethal has the solutions to those problem. You are worried about Officer safety, public safety and subject safety. Lamperd Less Lethal is worried about Officer safety, public safety and subject safety. It is with these objectives in mind that Lamperd has created an exceptional line of Less Lethal firearms/delivery systems and munitions ranging from 9mm to 50 caliber and impact rounds from 37 to 40 MM. The Defender I is the only true solution to these challenges. It is a five shot, compact, lightweight handheld revolver delivering 20-Gauge incapacitating projectiles.” Kuwait loves it! Me, not so much. You?

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Gun Review: Colt Combat Commander

COLT 1991 COMMANDER, RIGHT SIDE, FULL VIEW, c Jerry Catania

Why do governments always have to screw things up? Take the US Army’s attitude towards our service pistol used successfully through two world wars, for example. After WWII, some desk-pogue decided that the 1911 in .45 ACP had to go; it wasn’t “continental” enough, I guess. The first time the US Army tried to get rid of the 1911 Government model in .45 ACP was in 1949. Back then, US Government requirements were issued stating that the new pistol had to be chambered in 9mm parabellum (Latin is even neater than French) and couldn’t exceed seven inches in length or weigh more than 25 ounces. Colt’s entry –a shortened 1911 with an aluminum frame (called Coltalloy) wasn’t adopted (neither was the Smith and Wesson M39). So in 1950, Colt started producing their version for the retail market, calling it the Commander. Colt wisely brought it out in .45 ACP as well as 9mm and also in the red-headed stepchild, .38 Super. In 1970, Colt began making the Commander with a steel frame, calling it the “Combat Commander” and it’s still produced today. . .

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Gear Review: The Gunbox

P1120009

We say it all the time here at TTAG: the only two places a gun should ever be stored are on your hip or securely locked away. There’s been a boom recently in the number of bedside handgun vaults coming onto the market, but they all suffer from the same problems — namely they all look butt-ugly. Enter The Gunbox, a beautifully styled single firearm occupancy vault designed to not only provide some high-tech security, but to also look stylish while doing it. The only question left is does it work? . . .

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Rock Island Auctions Distances Itself from James D. Julia’s “Fake” Guns

Auction guns

Written by Rock Island Auctions’ Joel R. Kolander:

In the business of firearms auctions, it is simply an unavoidable fact of life that one is going to come across what is known as a spurious firearm. For those unfamiliar with the term, “spurious” is the most gracious way of calling something a fake. Phony. Bogus. At its most innocent, a fake or counterfeit item can be sold as such. Someone may want that Russian Contract 1911 pistol with spurious Cyrillic text, as a representation of the original but at only a fraction of the cost. In fact, many replica cars are sold just the same way. You wouldn’t find me turning down a replica of a 1968 AC Cobra, but I’m definitely not going to pay the same price as the original. There is a market for such pieces given that they are priced accordingly and disclosed as such to the buying public. Much like the AC Cobra example, replicas can be extremely desirable and a lot of fun . . .

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OMG! Cuddling A Stranger! Who Has a Gun! OMG!

Carmel DeAmicis (courtesy gigacom.com)

“Cuddlr is a location-based social-meeting app for cuddling,” cuddlrapp.com explains. “Find people near you who are up for a cuddle. Have a cuddle with them. No pressure.” What could possibly go wrong? A question gigaom.com journalist Carmel DeAmicis set out to answer. Reading the headline above the article – I snuggled with a stranger using new app Cuddlr, and my fellow cuddlee had a gun – you’d know that Ms. DeAmicis wasn’t the gun-toter in this close encounter of the Apple walled garden kind. Not so smart, eh? And you might think she penned an anti-gun piece. Nope. Here’s how it went down, gun-wise . . .

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SIG SAUER Working on a P220 in 10mm

SIG P220-1 Courtesy Ryan Finn

You could hear the exasperation in the SIG PR guy’s voice when he said it: “After every press release [for a new handgun], the very first question we get is ‘when are you going to make it in 10mm?’ It gets annoying.” Apparently the guys in Newington have finally relented, and as announced via the SIG Forum (and independently confirmed through our own sources) the release of a P220 in 10mm is on the horizon . . .

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First Look: Inter Ordnance Venom Pistol

inter-ordnance-venom

If you haven’t heard of Inter Ordnance, or IO Inc. yet, they manufacture various models of AK-47s, AR-15s, a couple variations of 1911s and are working on more. Many of their AR/AK variations are 100% American-made, with some having a combination of domestic and imported parts. We recently got to head out to their Palm Bay, Florida facility and got a sneak peak at their Venom 1911 pistol . . .

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First Look: Inter Ordnance (IO Inc)

Inter Ordnance - HQ

I recently had the pleasure of attending a factory tour and product demo for Inter Ordnance (IO), located in Palm Bay, Florida. If you haven’t heard of Inter Ordnance, or IO Inc., they manufacture various models of AK-47s, AR-15s, a couple variations of 1911s and are working on more. Many of their AR/AK variations are 100% American made, with some having a combination of domestic and imported parts (mostly imported furniture) . . .

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Incendiary Image of the Day: No Holster for the NRA Edition

(courtesy facebook.com)

 

There will be some who will say that the only thing incendiary about the above NRA Facebook post image is the fact that I chose to use it for our Incendiary Image of the Day feature. After all, the more important point is that the D.C. City Council is a bunch of anti-firearms freedom statist you-know-whats. Still. the NRA’s “thing” is gun safety. Not civilian disarmament dressing itself up as gun safety (e.g., Everytown for Gun Safety). Being safe with a gun. There is no way that the NRA should show a concealed carrier carrying a firearm without a proper holster. So yes, this image is incendiary to gun safety weenies like me. Deal with it. I had to.

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DC City Council Wants to Name and Ostracize Legal Gun Owners

I talked yesterday about the recently passed emergency concealed carry law that has been enacted in Washington, DC. As you can tell from the video, the council members certainly don’t like it. One member went as far as to state that they flat-out don’t want carry and don’t even want guns, but are being forced to change by both the courts and Congress. Frankly, if this extremely divided and partisan Congress can make up their mind that you’re in the wrong, you know you’re really in the wrong. What really astounded me though was one council member’s statements about whether gun owners should have a right to privacy. His opinion: that right doesn’t exist. Because he wants to ostracize them . . .

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ShootingTheBull410 on Ruger’s New LCR 9mm

Ruger LCR 9mm (courtesy ruger.com)

ShootingTheBull410 writes:

Well, that’s mildly interesting! I love revolvers, but — 9mm in a revolver has never made much sense to me. It’s rimless, meaning you need moon clips, and the gun ends up being about 4 ounces heavier than the .38 Special +P version. That’s a pretty hefty difference, going from 13.5 to 17.5 ounces. Ballistically . . .

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