ShootingTheBull410: 12 Gauge Slug vs. .454 Casull

The people at DoubleTap Ammunition sent me some .454 Casull rounds to test. And, in looking them over, I found that one of the rounds was a 400-grain, flatnose hardcast bullet, rated at 1400 feet per second. Now, that sounds pretty potent — heck, that’s up there in the neighborhood of a 12-gauge shotgun slug. Clearly, this called for an unlikely head-to-head test; 12-gauge shotgun vs. six-shot revolver . . .

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New From HPR Ammunition: Black Ops 9mm, .40 and .45 Cals.

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Yes, the gun biz may have peaked with the effects of slack demand rippling their way through gun manufacturers big and small, but one segment of the firearms economy that just can’t seem to catch up with demand is gun food. So another option is always welcome, right? HPR says when their new lead-free “Open Tipped Frangible” Black Ops personal defense loads enter a target, “the jacket and core separate with furious force of impact, resulting in mass force trauma.” Translation: this has ShootingTheBull410 written all over it. We’ve asked for samples so the maestro can put HPR’s newest through its paces. Press release after the jump . . .

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Hollow Point Ammunition: A Basic Rationale

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NOTE: This article is intended to be a basic rationale for the use of hollow point ammunition. It is not an exhaustive, ballistics-tested study on ammunition/bullet effectiveness.

My recent article on the plight of Shaneen Allen, a 27 year-old medical professional and mother of two arrested for possession of a handgun and hollow point ammunition in New Jersey raised quite a bit of commentary on hollow point ammunition restrictions. Allen was merely visiting New Jersey when stopped for a minor traffic violation. She politely informed the officer she had a handgun in her glove compartment, and her concealed carry license in Pennsylvania availed her nothing. She is facing up to ten years in prison . . .

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Hornady Recalls Some Critical Duty 9mm Ammo

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Hornady’s announced a recall of one lot of their 9mm Critical Duty 135gr +P ammo. This isn’t a huge recall and probably won’t affect a large number of buyers, but given that this is personal defense ammunition, it’s worth checking your inventory. Here’s the notice posted at Hornady’s site: “Hornady Mfg Company ballisticians have determined that some cartridges from Lot # 3141635 may exhibit light or no powder charges. Use of this product may result in firearm damage and or personal injury. If you own this Lot # or have any questions regarding this recall, please call 800-338-1242. Hornady Mfg Company will make all arrangements associated with this return and replacement of the product.”  [h/t ShootingTheBull410]

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ShootingTheBull410 9mm AmmoQuest: Winchester PDX1 124gr

Today’s test could prove interesting; I’m trying Winchester PDX1 (124gr +P) through the 3″ barrel pistol. Now, PDX1 is advertised by Winchester as being the FBI’s duty load, and since I’m using the FBI standards for penetration, surely PDX1 will pass with flying colors, right? The only problem is . . .

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Ammunition Review: RUAG 300 Winchester Magnum

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RUAG is a new player to the ammunition game. Well, relatively speaking at least. Founded in 1998, the company has positioned itself as a high-quality ammunition manufacturer and a direct competitor to the likes of Hornady in the United States and Lapua over in Finland. That high quality positioning comes with a high quality price, but my only question is whether their ammunition matches up with their claims. To that end, RUAG sent us some of their 300 Winchester Magnum rounds to test and figure that out for ourselves . . .

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PRIME Club: Guaranteed Ammunition at a Fixed Price

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Over the last few years, ammunition prices have been insane. Where 5.56 NATO used to be dirt cheap just a few short years back, prices went through the roof and have only recently started to come back to reality. While .22lr remains relatively inexpensive, finding it is as difficult as finding a gun rights advocate married to a Mom demanding action (for gun sense in America). Meanwhile, here’s an interesting new service that has been set up to get you as much ammunition as you can use at a guaranteed price and a guaranteed quantity . . .

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Self-Defense Tip: Check Your Luggage CAREFULLY Before Flying

(courtesy The Truth About Guns)
It happened to me! Foolish human that I am, I decided to use my range bag for a carry-on for a trip to the UK. Before departing The Land Of the Free and the Home of the Brave for The Land of Hope and Glory, I searched the bag with a fine-toothed comb. OK, nit-pickers, I used my hands. Anyway, I missed a single, solitary .22 cartridge – worth $42.70 at today’s prices – wedged deep into a side seam. The TSA missed it as well (they were busy frisking someone in a wheelchair). But not the UK scanners. My ten-year-old and I were given the third degree. Thankfully, eventually, the MP5-wielding police let us go without a cavity search or sanction, save a stern talking to. We could have been arrested. Check this tale from Pakistan [via zeenews.india.com] . . .

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North Carolina State Highway Patrol Buy SIG SAUER P226 in .357SIG

The North Carolina State Highway Patrol (NCSHP) are tooling-up with the SIG SAUER P226 in .357SIG. Given that the NCSHP has 1600 sworn officers, the order’s probably around 2k guns. SIG’s press release (after the jump) attributes the agency’s selection to the pistol’s “reliability, accuracy and durability.” These days, most all polymer pistols can make that claim; with proper maintenance, the minor variations in performance probably aren’t mission critical. What is important: customer service, price and, in this case, the round. “For law enforcement officers who work around vehicles and safety glass, the .357SIG is a fantastic choice for a duty pistol caliber,” said Tom Jankiewicz, Executive Director of Law Enforcement Sales. In other words, the round’s rep for barrier penetration is key. I wonder if the cartridge - producing what Hickock45 calls “significantly increased blast” – beats up a gun as much as .40 cal . . .

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Quote of the Day: By Any Means Necessary Edition

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“So much for another hard workweek in the Senate. The one accomplishment was the unintended protection of the E.P.A.’s authority over lead. Now the agency should protect the nation’s wildlife by finally banning lead ammunition and sinkers from the land.” – New York Times editorial, ‘Poison Shot From Guns’ [at nytimes.com]

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DARPA EXACTO Test Reveals Self-Guided .50-cal Rounds

So here it is: DARPA’s (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) unlisted YouTube video of the Extreme Accuracy Tasked Ordnance (EXACTO) program‘s first successful live-fire tests demonstration of in-flight guidance for .50-caliber bullets. “This video shows EXACTO rounds maneuvering in flight to hit targets that are offset from where the sniper rifle is initially aimed. EXACTO’s specially designed ammunition and real-time optical guidance system help track and direct projectiles to their targets by compensating for weather, wind, target movement and other factors that could impede successful aim.” TrackingPoint that! What are the odds Uncle Sam will ban the round for civilian use? [h/t you know who you are]

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Warwick, RI Police Ditch .9mm for .40 Ammo

Warwick police target, magnification unknown (courtesy warwickonline.com)

“The Warwick Police Department issues every officer a SIG P229 – a semi-automatic pistol distributed Sig Sauer,” warwickonline.com reports. “However, an officer may use a weapon of his own choosing as long as it is in .40 calibers. Some officers choose to carry Glocks. Previously, officers could carry anything they wanted but when it came time for Mathiesen to order the ammo, it could get confusing. ‘I had to literally figure out what you carry if you carried a .9 mm or if you carried a .40 mm,’ [Inspector Chris ] Mathiesen said. ‘I had to balance all the info and it was a nightmare.’” Not to mention the nightmare of loading all those rounds and sweeping up afterwards.

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