Is Governor Fallin Failing the Constitutional Carry Test?

courtesy ktul.com

The Oklahoma Senate passed a constitutional carry bill on May 2. The bill was sent to Governor Mary Fallin’s desk…where it remains. The popular bill passed both the House and the Senate by veto-proof margins.

But the legislature no longer has the power to override a veto because they’ve adjourned for the year.

From nraila.org:

Currently sitting on Governor Fallin’s desk is constitutional carry legislation, Senate Bill 1212. With time running out for her to take action, it is important that you contact Governor Fallin immediately and urge her to sign this important self-defense legislation into law. …

Again, please contact Governor Mary Fallin at 405-521-2342 and strongly urge her to sign Senate Bill 1212 into law.

Anti-carry groups are engaged in heavy lobbying as well, urging the governor to veto the bill as a last ditch effort to stop the popular measure.

From newsok.com:

Fallin has about two weeks to decide whether to sign Senate Bill 1212, which would allow Oklahoma residents who are at least 21 to carry a firearm without a permit or training.

Michael McNutt, the governor’s spokesman, said Monday, “The governor’s office is receiving heavy traffic in the form of emails and calls from both sides of the issue regarding SB 1212. The governor is discussing the measure with her staff as well as reviewing input from citizens, groups, agencies and others.”

Constitutional carry refers to the state of law when the Bill of Rights was passed in 1791. Back then, no permits were required to buy, possess, or carry firearms anywhere in the United States. In states with constitutional carry these days, no permit is required for most adults to carry firearms openly or concealed. There’s been a constitutional carry resurgence in the US since 2003.

In 2003, Alaska passed the reform to restore the exercise of Second Amendment rights. After seven more years, in 2010, Arizona passed Constitutional Carry. If Governor Fallin signs SB 1212 into law, Oklahoma will be the 14th constitutional carry state in the nation.

Several other states have come close to passing constitutional carry bills of their own. Utah, North Dakota, Wisconsin, Montana and others all have legislation that has come close to passage. There will be a serious push to pass constitutional carry in Texas in 2019 during the next legislative session.

Keep your eye on Oklahoma.

©2018 by Dean Weingarten: Permission to share is granted when this notice and link are included.

Gun Watch

comments

  1. avatar Sam I Am says:

    Why all the hair-on-fire? There is no, none, nada, zip, zero downside to vetoing the bill. Stops the measure, forces a re-do when the legislature might be re-configured by elections. Gains points with gun grabbers.

    Where is the incentive for the governor to sign the bill?

    1. avatar Mike in OK says:

      Since she is an R, the downside is backlash from those who supported her. I’ve sent emails to every R I think might have some pull to let them know that if she doesn’t sign, I’ll either vote D or stay home come election day this fall. If Oklahoma gun owners are going to get screwed, we might as well get it from the Democrats instead of backstabbing R’s. She’s been a horrible disappointment, and the only reason someone as clearly incompetent as herself has been elected twice is that enough Oklahomans are more afraid of electing filthy socialists (every single creature that calls itself a Democrat) than they are of letting a retard drive the bus. So we roll on with a water head at the wheel. But if she’s the best the R’s can do, maybe we need to send them to the back bench to rethink their positions.

      1. avatar Sam I Am says:

        I think it a mistake to conclude or believe that every “right-thinking” Repub is a single-issue, “gun rights” or death, voter.

        Or should be.

        1. avatar Mike in OK says:

          I don’t expect them to be single issue, but they constantly tell us to vote for them because they are conservatives and will protect our rights. So I think they should actually do what they say (especially when all the hard work is done and all she has to do is put ink to paper). I know that all too often they won’t, because all those things they said to get elected are just words they have to say to get the job, same as the oath they take.

          If we can’t trust them to defend our right to keep and bear arms, and our right to defend ourselves, how can we trust them to defend any of our other rights? And if they can’t be trusted to do the things they say (or at least make an effort to do those things), why the hell should we keep voting for them? Because the alternative is worse? A slow death instead of a quick one?

        2. avatar Sam I Am says:

          “why the hell should we keep voting for them? Because the alternative is worse? A slow death instead of a quick one?”

          Nailed it !

          The only effective choice left to the voter is the party of quick death of the republic, and party of the slow, but inexorable slide to the same end.

          (for all you revolutionaries, rebellion is not “voting” as it is classically understood).

        3. avatar Toni says:

          @Mike and Sam

          both right. quick death is preferable as it might just stir people enough to get off their collective asses and fight back hard. this death of a thousand cuts is intolerable to those who truly value liberty however their numbers are not great enough to turn the tide if they took up arms sad to say. yes Bundy ranch was a bit of an exception but in that case the BLM knew they were in the wrong doing what they were and that they would face severe backlash from the public if they had opened fire. what they hoped to gain they knew they were not going to gain by opening fire on those patriots especially as there was video footage going all over the internet of exactly what was happening and the patriots refused to fire the first shot. Randy Weaver years before there was no independent footage nor was there at Waco so they could make it seem however they wanted for the most part.

        4. avatar Joe R. says:

          The Lt. Governor, Todd Lamb, is the President of the Oklahoma Senate. If she vetoes it, he can call the Senate back into session at any time to override the veto.

          Let’s see if ole Todd wants to ever be governor.

        5. avatar Sam I Am says:

          “The Lt. Governor, Todd Lamb, is the President of the Oklahoma Senate. If she vetoes it, he can call the Senate back into session at any time to override the veto.”

          From what I have seen, special sessions are rare. Lack of budget to pay for the session seems to be the common response (not to mention the complaining of the legislators).

        6. avatar Chris Mallory says:

          “The Lt. Governor, Todd Lamb, is the President of the Oklahoma Senate. If she vetoes it, he can call the Senate back into session at any time to override the veto.”

          Doesn’t sound like it from this:

          “Under the Oklahoma Constitution, legislative sessions must begin at noon on the first Monday in February of every odd-numbered year, cannot exceed one hundred and sixty days, and must be finally adjourned by no later than five o’clock p.m. on the last Friday in May of each year.[18] The first session cannot exceed 160 days.[19] In odd numbered years following an election, the legislature must meet on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in January for the sole purpose of determining the outcome of the statewide elections. This meeting must begin at noon and must be adjourned by five o’clock p.m. on the same day.

          The Legislature may be called into special session by a written call for such purposes as may be specifically set out in the call, signed by two-third of the members of the Senate and two-thirds of the members of the House of Representatives when it is filed with the President Pro Tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, who shall issue jointly an order for the convening of the special session. However, the Legislature may not prevent the calling of a special session by the governor.”

          It can be called back, but they have two weeks to do it unless they convince 2/3rds of both chambers to agree to a special session.

        7. avatar Ed Schrade says:

          They should listen to the people that voted them in office. The socialist dems did not vote for her.

      2. avatar MarkPA says:

        I agree with your approach. The GOP regards gun-owners as a “captured” voter base just as the Democrats regard Black voters as captured. Once a voter base is captured it has no rational alternative but to defect. Otherwise, it will be taken for granted.

        There is a price to be paid for defecting. You have to give-up the seniority of a legislator in a legislature driven by seniority. Yet, if you will never pay the price of defection you will inevitably pay the price of being ignored.

        So here we are; what will we do about it?

        1. avatar neiowa says:

          You apparently missed “the Tea Party”. MAGA, Drain the Swamp, etc

          FINO is NOT a growth plan.

    2. avatar Rattlerjake says:

      Our country is on an irreversible downhill slide – that is not only fact but follows Biblical prophesy!

      Our whole society revolves around the same incident that occurred in the Garden of Eden! Ever since the feminist movement started, our society has gone downhill and will continue to do so as long as women are put on a pedestal. The majority percentage of females in our society are leftists and push ALL of the immorality and criminality, as well as establishing minimal punishment for offenders – EXCEPT FOR WHITE MALES! Women push for irresponsible sex (especially of the under-aged), abortion, homosexuality, transgenderism, mixing of negros with whites, affirmative action, easy divorce and exaggerated child support and spousal compensation, condoning illegal aliens, minimal or light sentences for criminals (especially violent offenders), women taking positions of authority and any job that men do, they push gun control, support anyone offended by anything normal, and they initiate and push ALL of the freebies that have been foisted on the tax-payers! Do you wonder why the majority of women voted for hil-LIAR-y or bernie, and an even higher number voted for Obastard? Women have always been driven by one thing – the “Love of Money”! All they think about is “stardom/15 minutes of fame”, winning the lottery, holding high paying jobs that they are unable to perform, having the biggest house, newest car, and ALL of the latest conveniences, when most men (mostly conservatives) are satisfied with the bare essentials; and most (99%) of leftist men cower to every whim of the women – and they are NEVER SATISFIED! Look how women have taken over the media, daytime gossip shows (like ellen and the view), political offices, education, and have even infiltrated the offices of clergy! And it is ALWAYS the “celebrity” women that open their big mouths about everything conservative or moral, in favor of the immoral, abnormal, and false narratives! Women ALWAYS support the “established” narrative from government, whether it is the 9/11 story, Sandy Hook lies, evolution/ ball earth/ big bang theories, climate warming, green energy, false narratives of history, common core, the gender lies, etc. This is a sure sign that prophesy is about to be fulfilled – “When evil becomes good and good becomes evil”!

      This is not ALL women, but it IS the vast majority (by percentage)! Our society is doomed because there is NO WAY to reverse this trend and it will continue to get worse.

      Try this “experiment” – Tell you wife/girlfriend/ female partner that you need to down size. Tell her you need to sell the car and get a “clunker, tell her that you need to get rid of the cell phones and cable TV, tell her that you need to cut the purchase of excessive clothing and food, tell her that you want to find a smaller place in the country (away from convenience stores and shopping) – GOOD LUCK!

  2. avatar PeterK says:

    Ugh, I’m still mad at Governer Herbert for vetoing in Utah. >: |

    1. avatar Ralph says:

      And Dennis Daugaard in South Dakota. Same sh!t, different RINO.

  3. avatar Ralph says:

    I don’t trust Fallin as far as I can throw her — and it would take a large Roman catapult to throw her any distance at all.

    1. avatar surlycmd says:

      A trebuchet to throw her would be more fun to watch. Just my humble opinion.

      1. avatar Rusty Chains says:

        I would pay to watch that, are you selling tickets?

        1. avatar craig klimek says:

          Where is Monty Python when you need them….

    2. avatar Rattlerjake says:

      Upvote of the day!

  4. avatar Jay in Florida says:

    If she doesn’t sign it. Her career will be over.
    Assuming nothing changes. Or she vetoes it. Back it will go next session and be passed and signed by whoever is sitting there.
    If its still her.
    They, the legislature will make sure its veto proof the 2nd time time around.

    1. avatar Sam I Am says:

      The article claims the bill was passed by a veto-proof legislature. But….the legislature is no longer sitting, and cannot override a veto.

      Rather doubt the legislature will be willing to take up constitutional carry again. If it were an important piece of legislation, it would not have been delayed until the last minute.’

      If the governor vetoes the bill, she wins.

      If the governor vetoes the bill, legislature wins because they passed the bill and can claim the credit.

      1. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

        You’re probably a resident of a state with a full-time legislature, and therefore do not understand why such bills would be “passed at the last minute.”

        In states with part-time or limited-time legislatures, they have to get through the state budget, typically a big educational spending bill, then several bills related to some bunch of welfare spending… and then, finally, they can get to discretionary legislation.

        Even here in Wyoming, gun bills end up being pushed to the end of the legislative session – because there’s so much mandatory fiscal legislation that has to be debated and passed in a limited amount of time.

        In states with full-time legislatures, you don’t see the rush of discretionary bills at the end of the session, because your legislative parasites are sucking at the feed bunk 365 days a year, every year.

        1. avatar Sam I Am says:

          I understand your explanation, but….

          Whenever the mandatory legislation is complete there is always a pile of legislation of secondary importance. That pile is not sifted randomly; a priority system exists. From the pile, some piece of proposed legislation must take first place for submission, and something must take second position, and so on. It is called “prioritization”.

          Every legislature knows when the current session ends. Every legislator knows when the current session ends (regardless of the type schedule in place). Every legislator knows whether or not a bill must be signed be the governor in order to be considered law. Every legislator knows what they need to know in order to scheme a path for getting their legislation passed and signed. And….every legislator knows which type governor they have. So, the only thing remaining is to organize the legislative schedule to favor getting particular bills passed and signed.

          Given that no state has a full-time, 24/7, unending legislative year, priorities must be established. Even where games are paid with jamming legislation into the last week of the session. In the end, it is always about priorities. And the blatant truth is that pro-gun legislation does not sit atop the pile of non-mandatory legislation. Not in the legislature, and not in the minds of the voters. Simply put, if a pro-2A governor, and a pro-2A legislature wanted to make constitutional carry a reality, they would have engineered the process to ensure that outcome. Didn’t happen in Oklahoma. There is a reason; a reason that needs to be unraveled and re-evaluated.

        2. avatar DrewR55 says:

          You’re absolutely right. Plus, the state’s public educators went on strike this year for almost two weeks while camping out at the Capitol. That messed everyone’s schedule up.

        3. avatar neiowa says:

          Sam is seldom correct.

          With “part time legislature” low priority items are killed in subcommittee. The only items that get to the floor at items that are driven/forced there.

          That Governor Mary didn’t sign within a hour of passing the leg. tells you all you need to know. She’s a RINO and should GO.

        4. avatar Sam I Am says:

          Seldom correct about what?

        5. avatar DrewR55 says:

          Oh, I meant DG was right about ‘part time’ legislature.

        6. avatar strych9 says:

          Sam:

          That’s just not the way it works in states that don’t have a professionalized legislature. States line OK or NM the people who are in the legislature have few aids, nearly no money and basically do this whole thing on top of their regular job as a “favor to the state”. If they’re lucky, once they get paid they might break even on the whole thing. It’s no where near as organized as you seem to think and it never will be, which is kinda the point because it prevents BS legislation from getting through. (A side effect of which is that some useful stuff gets caught up in the filter too.)

          DG is right. You’re looking at this thinking it works like DC or Albany. It doesn’t. Not even close. I don’t know all the in and outs of the OK legislative process but if it’s remotely like NM then DG has hit the nail on the head. It’s surprisingly close to just being an ad hoc way of doing things.

        7. avatar Sam I Am says:

          You seem to be describing legislatures like OK as being essentially amateurs conducting a chinese fire drill.

          My state government is not in session continually. The legislators are not the proletariat. They are monied personages that can afford to be legislators.

          Oklahoma is not as unsophisticated as people like to think. OK is a state that once had is capitol in Tulsa, A raid was conducted by the rich and powerful of Oklahoma City, wherein the entire repository of state documents were captured and moved to Oklahoma City. Whereupon a challenge something like “Molon Labe” was issued. The matter was not challenged, and OKC has been the capitol since.

          Legislators in OK are quite capable of managing a legislative calendar. The whole constitutional carry matter looks like normal chicanery expected of politicians (whose one and only concern is getting re-elected).

      2. avatar DrewR55 says:

        The 2A friendly members of the state legislature put up Constitutional Carry, Campus Carry, and a host of other bills every year but they die in sub-committees. The state Board of Regeants and David Boren have killed Campus Carry every year for over a decade (yeah, I’m a little bitter). The only reason this one made it to the governor’s desk was because of a bait and switch by a 2A friendly member of the House.

        When SB 1212 (a bill removing carry restrictions from Wildlife Refuge lands) made it out of the Senate sub-committee and passed in the Senate he tacked on Constitutional Carry as an amendment on the House floor after it passed in the House sub-committee.

        Thanks to a bunch of Republican douchbags who think they have done enough (and are probably taking Bloomberg’s money )this will probably never see the governor’s desk again because the same trick probably won’t work twice.

        I had really hoped Fallin would sign this into law but I just don’t know anymore.

    2. avatar Dennis says:

      Dosent matter if her career is over or not. She is nearing the end of her term and she cannot be reelected because she has reached her term limit.

      Source: I’m an Oklahoma resident

      1. avatar DrewR55 says:

        Plus, it isn’t like we will ever send her back to Washington to chase state troopers again.

        Between the budget, the teachers striking, the bridge between Lex and Purcell, her daughter and that stupid band (and trailer), the OMES boondoggle I wouldn’t vote for her to pickup road kill in Texas Co.

    3. avatar uncommon_sense says:

      Jay in Florida,

      I have this unshakable thought that the legislature made a deal with Governor Fallin: the legislature passes it on the condition that Fallin vetoes it.

      That allows the legislature to score points with their gun-rights supporters since the legislature voted for the bill. It also allows the legislature to NOT alienate moderates who oppose carrying without a license since the bill never becomes law (assuming that Fallin vetoes it).

      1. avatar Mike in OK says:

        She’ll never veto it. All she has to do is ignore it for another week or so and it’s dead.

        1. avatar uncommon_sense says:

          Mike in OK,

          That is what I meant: the legislature passed the bill knowing that the governor would veto it through her failure to sign the bill into law.

        2. avatar Geoff PR says:

          “She’ll never veto it. All she has to do is ignore it for another week or so and it’s dead.”

          In that case, ‘veto proof vote’ is a fucking joke that needs to be rectified, or a lawsuit filed.

          What she is doing is a veto, in a slimy way. If she ignores it, file a lawsuit and demand a jury trial…

  5. avatar Mark N. says:

    In a number of states, bills become law without the governor’s signature, in others, as with the President, they do not become law without a signature. Too bad that Oklahoma falls into the latter camp. It sounds as if she may decide to simply not act upon the bill and allow it to die without an express veto.

    1. avatar Geoff PR says:

      If she lets it die, the citizens of Oklahoma need to file suit and demand a jury trial…

  6. avatar former water walker says:

    Wow thought that was a guy😖Doing nothing gives “her” an out…

  7. avatar ironicatbest says:

    There’s probably going to be some big shootem up in an Constitutional State, then she throw the bill in the trash.

  8. avatar Anonymoose says:

    No mention of Vermont having Constitutional Carry and generally awesome gun laws until their Republican governor screwed the pooch recently.

  9. avatar Green Mtn. Boy says:

    RINO’s abound,Vermonts RINO is going to get the boot in this falls election sounds as Oklahoma’s could use the same.

    https://www.vermontgetsstern.org/#

  10. avatar barnbwt says:

    I think pressure should be more on the congressional leaders than the known antigun governor.

    “You ran a winning issue down to the 1 yd line and spiked the ball? Why should you have any voice in deciding policy going forward?”

  11. avatar stateisevil says:

    She will not veto it, she’ll just not sign it. The fact so many Republicans passed this suggests to me they know she wouldn’t sign it. She is a dtatist,and gun rights are very stagnant in the Trump era. Constitutional carry was the rage when Obama was in at the federal level.

  12. avatar MIO says:

    Yeah I knew we were in trouble when she signed the church carry bill and not this one. I think that’s been the plan all along. Her career is over and others want to look like the good guys for elections.

  13. avatar Setnakhte says:

    She vetoed it.

  14. avatar MIO says:

    VETO
    She vetoed it
    I knew it when she didn’t sign it the other day.
    Dang it

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