Question of the Day: Why Do Gun Owners Fear The Government?

ATF Special Response Team to the rescue (courtesy vimeo.com)

According to a recent CBS poll, just under half of American gun owners list “protection from crime” as the main reason they’re tooled-up. Just five percent of respondents chose “protection from government.” So much for the antis’ contention that American gun owners are paranoid proto-insurrectionists. The CBS poll asks these “five percenters” why they’re Uncle Sam-averse . . .

CBS poll on "strict" gun laws (courtesy cbsnews.com)

Note: the CBS poll doesn’t define “strict gun laws.” A respondent could well believe that “more strict laws” means harsher penalties for criminals who use a firearm in the commission of a crime. Not gun control.

Anyway, if you’re amongst this government-suspecting group, which one of those answers — or one of your own –best describes your worries? If it were me, I’d write-in “The possibility of government genocide.” That’s Mr. Paranoid Proto-Insurrectionist, bub . . .

 

comments

  1. avatar Chip Bennett says:

    Why Do Gun Owners Fear The Government?

    False premise. If I may deign to speak for “gun owners”: we do not fear the government. Rather, we fear the potential for government tyranny, and understand the risk that government-imposed gun control poses toward furthering the likelihood of a tyrannical government.

    (Caveat: in the context of the linked poll, I would not be a 5%er. I would list the main reason that I carry daily as the risk of common crime.)

    1. avatar Gman says:

      Rather, we fear the potential for government tyranny…
      What potential? Real tyranny exists right now. Any and all laws which restrict the free exercise of the keeping and bearing of arms are unconstitutional and those states which would put me in jail should I cross their borders are tyrannical. Those who usurp the Constitution under the color of law in direct opposition to their oath of office and those in the courts who uphold those laws have already brought tyranny upon us. Do I fear government, your darn right I do. As should we all.

      1. avatar California Richard says:

        …you shouldn’t fear government. We out number and out gun them 10,000:1. The smart government types fear us. What we fear is the disolution of the central functions that government provides and the social instability that would bring. We could topple any domestic government in a week, but then we would fight a Balkan style civil war for the next 100 years. THAT fear is what gives them their power and why we allow the government to play it’s games. But have no doubt, they are holding a wolf by the ears and the smart ones know it.

        1. avatar tiger says:

          Hmmmmm….. No. Your dreaming or have that “Animal House” speech of Bluto in your ears

      2. avatar Big Bill says:

        “Any and all laws which restrict the free exercise of the keeping and bearing of arms are unconstitutional and those states which would put me in jail should I cross their borders are tyrannical.”

        Then you think arming prisoners in jail is a good thing? Aren’t those people included as restricted in the free exercise of keeping and bearing arms?

    2. avatar dlj95118 says:

      …well said, Mr. Bennett.

    3. avatar Huntmaster says:

      We don’t fear the government. Many of us work for, or have worked for the government or have time in the military and have sworn to defend the government or rather the constitution. We just know that government employees will, for the most part, do just about anything to protect their pension and benefits. And claim they were just doing their job. Just like the guy holding that rifle on the Uncle of Elian Gonzalez. Just doing his job.

      1. avatar MLeake says:

        Elian Gonzalez is a bad example. Unless you think the US Government should suborn keeping a child from his surviving parent because the parent lives in Cuba.

        The uncle should not have tried to keep Elian from his father. At minimum, that was custodial interference; but it could also be viewed as false imprisonment or kidnapping.

        I can’t stand the Clintons nor Janet Reno, but that case was one where they were correct in principle.

        Their use of force was over the top; however, I am not sure what level of resistance they had anticipated from Elian’s uncle.

  2. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

    Because we’re not stupid.

    1. avatar JasonM says:

      Because it’s not as scared of us as it should be.

      1. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

        The bright side of sleeping in a grizzly bear’s den is you don’t have to worry about getting eaten by wolves.

  3. avatar OmnivorousBeorn says:

    Because, ultimately, I know I can’t beat the government, and that scares me. Also, I don’t want to shoot local cops or get jailed for owning a gun. I’m as eager for trouble with the government as trouble with criminals.

  4. avatar strych9 says:

    It’s not that I don’t “trust” the government it’s that cops aren’t always around and the government often displays nearly stunning incompetence.

    Heck, they can’t even keep their new Amtrak train from derailing for ONE run.

    1. avatar A O says:

      If you’re referring to the derailment yesterday, that particular track it was on was not federally owned, but privately. Amtrack is partially federally owned, private portion is for-profit.

      1. avatar strych9 says:

        You may wish to check with the SCOTUS (see Department of Transportation v. Association of American Railroads), Amtrak itself and a number of other sources on that.

        Amtrak is government owned but “for profit” (which it doesn’t make but whatever) and has rights to certain sections of private rail when they’re not in use for freight. (Which you’ll find out if you ride it long distance. You’ll end up sitting there waiting for a freight train to use the tracks because they get first crack at any section of rail that actually is privately owned.)

        On top of that, the section of rail in question was not private. It was, and I quote, a “14.5-mile bypass owned by the regional transit authority[emphasis mine] specifically meant to bypass the private rail lines to avoid freight traffic, curves and tunnels which slowed passenger traffic. This section of rail was built using $181 million in taxpayer funds.

        Further still, while operating under the Amtrak banner this was part of “Amtrak Cascades” which is operated entirely by the States of Washington and Oregon according to the Washington DOT. In fact, if you look at the passes for that train they specifically note that the whole thing is run by WSDOT and the Oregon Department of Transportation. They say so right on the train pass.

      2. avatar Geoff PR says:

        Who owned the railbed isn’t the issue for that derailment, that was 100 percent operator error, AKA, the metaphoric “nut behind the wheel”.

        You can’t fit 100 gallons of liquid in a 55 gal drum, and a curve as sharp as the one before the bridge cannot be negotiated at 80+ mph.

        Oddly enough, we haven’t yet heard who was driving that ‘crazy train’, and what their excuse was for hitting that curve 50 mph *over* the rated speed limit.

        (Tho I suppose a mandatory drug test is in their immediate future…)

        1. avatar strych9 says:

          Which would still point to a basic inability of government to hire competent workers. Kinda like TSA.

          That’s my point. The weak link in the system is the fact that the government, seemingly consistently, spends money on stuff rather than competent staff. SWAT teams, TSA, Amtrak, “the stimulus”… the list goes on endlessly and the thread that ties everything together is that at some level people in government are incompetent.

      3. avatar Icabod says:

        Think Strych9 is pointing out that after $181,000,000, all the government regulations, and all the government inspections, they didn’t prevent someone from doing 81 in a 30. Even the supposed automatic cut off failed.
        Gun laws work only for those that obey them. In Chicago and other gun ravaged cities, the odds of conviction for a gun crime is low. Dismissed, pleas bargained away, or dropped is more likely.

        1. avatar strych9 says:

          Yes. Thank you.

          The point is that government often seems to spend moronic amounts of money and then fall flat on their face in terms of the simple stuff.

          It stands to reason that the person driving this train, the conductor or whatever, was an Amtrak Cascades employee. If that is indeed the case then the government spent a ton of money and failed on the simple thing: hiring a competent person to operate the train.

          To put it in a “gun” context: Look at all the money the government has spent creating these SWAT teams for pretty much every LEO in the country. With all that gear, money and intelligence collecting power they still regularly hit the wrong house looking for drugs. Why? Because the amount of gear you have means nothing if you’re not smart enough to use it.

        2. avatar Chad says:

          Haha, when you say it like that reminds of the enormous increase in Service Management and ITIL that has drowned IT departments over the past 10 years…

  5. avatar BLoving says:

    I don’t fear a duly elected, publicly accountable, constitutionally restricted representative republic. I do fear an unaccountable, faceless group of career bureaucrats and elitist statists elected by a mob of uninformed and wilfully ignorant people who likely couldn’t name their own congressional representative and two state senators. 🤠

    1. avatar uncommon_sense says:

      ^ This!

      Plus eleventy billion.

    2. avatar Gman says:

      I don’t fear a duly elected, publicly accountable, constitutionally restricted representative republic.

      Except we don’t have this. Elected officials are not publically accountable. They do not honor their oath of office to support and defend the Constitution. They make laws which apply to us and not them. They are not transparent.

      1. avatar BLoving says:

        So we agree what the problem is.
        It has been suggested before that one simple change could radically change our government for the better and permanently: A constitutional amendment that any and all laws, regulations, fines, fees, taxes and lifestyle suggestions must apply in full to Congress, the Senate and the President of the United States – no carve-outs or exemptions.

        Anyone want to put odds on that one?

        1. avatar Gman says:

          Mark Levin – The Liberty Amendments

          Had to read it several times to really understand the nuances and how corrupt our federal government has become. The Interstate Commerce clause has been distorted beyond reason in a massive power grab never intended by the founders.

        2. avatar Ing says:

          Another thing that would change our government for the better, and permanently, would be repealing the 17th amendment and having state governments assign senators as the Constitution originally specified.

          It would cut a lot of ignorant and stupid voters out of the loop. Less pandering to mobs of morons = better government. Heck, even if voters were as well-informed and conscientious as we could wish, it would still yield better government simply by restoring the balance of power between states and the federal government.

      2. avatar Big Bill says:

        Actually, they are publicly accountable. The problem is that they are not held publicly accountable.
        Every so many years, their accountability comes due by the electoral process. Unfortunately, there are not enough informed voters to hold them accountable.

  6. avatar Joe R. says:

    Why do FAKE NEWS MSM hate their fellow citizens? Why are the so infected with communism? We know, in communist countries, media sit on a little higher plane than all of the ‘we’re in this communism thing together’ working class rabble. Here, should communism lift any higher off the peg, they’d get mowed down brutally as the precursor to fixing that sh_t (as previous destroyers of communism have already demonstrated).

  7. avatar Illinois Shooter in Texas says:

    I don’t believe in the monopoly on the use of force. The idea of a “democratically elected government” leading to something not based on the constitution… There is this living breathing place called Venezuela as a great example of the .GOV controlling all arms and thus everything else…

    Those food lines werent enforced with harsh words. it was the army with rifles.
    Those TV stations were not taken over by hippies with signs, it was an army with rifles.
    The farms that were needed to “feed the people”…

    There is a reason our system was setup the way it was. And the idea that government served the people and SHOULD FEAR THE PEOPLE was inherent to that. I will keep my guns. I will not bury them. If its time to bury them, its time to use them.

  8. avatar A O says:

    Wouldn’t “laws don’t stop criminals from having guns” fall under personal protection from crime, removing them from the 5% group?

  9. avatar Tom says:

    Nobody’s trying to take your guns

    We only want to require that you register them, restrict transfers, ban certain guns ( read all), prohibit carrying them, limit ammo capacity, make any arbitrary law necessary to accomplish these things and throw you in jail for violating any of them. At which point we will take your guns……….Got it ! What part of “ shall not be infringed “ is confusing?

    1. avatar strych9 says:

      “What part of “ shall not be infringed “ is confusing?”

      The “not” part, apparently.

  10. avatar Ogre says:

    I fear the government (and I work for the Feds) because it is the nature of government to accrue power unto itself – it never stops. One would think that after 230 years of being a constitutional republic we would have enough laws to take care of any eventuality, possibly with minor tune-ups to account for things like advanced technology. But no, the governments at all levels continue to make laws on top of more laws, making for bigger government and less “of the the people, for the people, and by the people.” We have more and bigger government, much of which is unaccountable to the people, than ever before. At some point, the government will cease to be “of the people” and more like “of the career politicians, for the lawyers and by the bureaucrats.” At some point, I believe, the government will reach breaking point and the people who don’t want it to enforce cradle-to-grave control over them will rebel (if they can succeed in remaining armed) and overthrow it. If they don’t, a great light will have gone out. That’s why I fear government. It can never rule me as well as I can rule myself.

    1. avatar Big Bill says:

      I hate the term “constitutional republic!”
      Yes, we are a republic. Yes, we have a constitution.
      So does China.
      So does Cuba.
      So does North Korea.
      So what? Does having a constitution somehow make these countries wonderful places to live?
      Does the mere fact that we have a constitution somehow confer legitimacy?
      No, it’s the type of constitution we have that makes us different. Our constitution is unique in that it not only limits what the government can do, but it also recognizes certain rights as being innate to the people, not granted by the government, and forbids the government to remove or even substantially restrict those rights.

  11. avatar Ed Rogers says:

    Do I think a evil regime is in power or a subsequent administration will be? No.

    As Chip eloquently stated, it’s the potential of one, enabled by gun control.

    Study history. Look at world affairs. Complacency kills.

  12. avatar bobinmi says:

    not fear, its called distrust

  13. avatar former water walker says:

    I don’t “fear” the gubmint. Disgust,dismay,annoyed,dislike and contempt might are better descriptions. They CAN ruin my life very easily. How about wary? Oh and I live in Illinois-where my gun rights rest on a thread…😖😫😡

  14. avatar MarkPA says:

    Why “CAN’T” it happen here?

    In my own memory, Southern law-enforcement routinely conspired with the KKK to deprive Blacks (and their White supporters) of their civil rights through organized violence.

    Today, BLM and many Progressives complain that law-enforcement officers kill – unjustifiably – minority youths. Progressives espouse terror at the prospect of what a Trump presidency means for the future of liberty in our country. To day nothing about prior presidents: Bush 43; Bush 41; Reagan; Nixon; FDR; Wilson; . . . Jackson.

    The Founders were correct. There is no reason to presume that any government won’t turn tyrannous. A tyranny of the majority is to be feared every bit as much as one held by a minority.

    What might we expect in a modern-day version of a “democratic” government with rigorous gun-control? We need look no farther than our neighbor to the South, Mexico. The inter-twined forces of central and local government with organized crime disarm only the law-abiding citizens of that country.

    There is no more viable guarantee to the security of a free-state than a well-armed citizenry including the body of the people.

  15. avatar ColdNorth says:

    All the stated fears sound reasonable to me, because each and every one was implemented here in Canada. Owning a firearm is illegal according to the Criminal Code of Canada. What happens is that Canadian gun “owners” are given permission to have firearms provided they satisfy certain criteria, and they must renew this permission every five years. Every so often, some of the guns they “own” are prohibited. Sometimes they must be turned in for destruction, and sometimes they are “grandfathered”, which means you may sell them to other gun “owners” who have similar guns (example – FN FALs). There are other complexities that I don’t need to get into now.

    The real question for me is why don’t more American gun owners have these concerns?

    1. avatar BLoving says:

      American gun owners DO have those fears. The problem here is: the Americans who are not gun owners fail to see such restrictions on their civil rights as a potential problem – therefore they do and say nothing about it.

  16. avatar TX_Lawyer says:

    For people who say they don’t fear the government, I have one question, why do you pay taxes?

    As to the 5% thing, that question was asked of the either 11% who said they think gun laws are too strict or the 39% who didn’t say they though gun laws should be more strict.

    Also, this poll and the people who answered the questions, for the most part, are stupid. See question 22 in which only 12% of the people think “people in your town” pose a real physical threat that might need to be defended against. At least some of the other categories, all of which scored higher, would almost certainly include “people in your town.”

    1. avatar uncommon_sense says:

      “For people who say they don’t fear the government, I have one question, why do you pay taxes?”

      Because the courts become the key player in that situation and the courts will ALWAYS ensure that government wins and subjects the people lose. After all, the courts are part of government.

      Remember Sun Tzu’s Art of War principle: never fight your enemy on their terms. Simply not paying taxes and then going to court is fighting on their (governments’) terms.

      The real problem, TX_Lawyer, is that the courts and “law” in our country is corrupt beyond hope. If you don’t believe me, tell me why a simple, hand-written, witnessed, and notarized statement of my wishes upon being incapacitated or after my death is not 100,000% IRON CLAD. And after you answer that, please tell me why a truly innocent person (with solid evidence and witnesses) who represents themselves in court is virtually guaranteed to lose. Finally, please tell me why it would cost something like $50,000 to $100,000 in attorney fees to fight an unjust tax assessment all the way to a state supreme court.

    2. avatar Chip Bennett says:

      For people who say they don’t fear the government, I have one question, why do you pay taxes?

      Many reasons, that do not derive from fear of the government. For example:

      1. In principle, I believe in adhering to the Rule of Law, even if I disagree with part of the law by which I am ruled.
      2. In principle, I believe that a government of, by, and for the people is rightly funded by the people, of which I am a member (even if I disagree on the amount of required contribution, or the uses to which my contribution is put).
      3. I believe that paying taxes is biblical submission to earthly authority (render unto Caesar what is Caesar’s…)

  17. avatar Tim U says:

    “Why do gun owners fear the government ?”

    Answer: because they’re awake and paying attention to the world around them.

  18. avatar uncommon_sense says:

    I don’t fear our government per se — rather, I fear opposing our tyrannical government all by myself, since that would be a fruitless gesture.

  19. avatar Chris says:

    Kelly Thomas and the fact that no cop is ever held accountable for his actions. It’s legal for the police to lie to you. Anything you tell an investigator can not be repeated to a jury if it’s favorable to you. I could go on, but it’s not something I like to spend all day thinking about. Bottom line is don’t talk to the police because they are not your friend.

  20. avatar Danny says:

    Paradoxically, I fear a government completely under the sway of the kinds of politicians that get an A+ rating from the NRA. I believe Americans need guns to protect themselves from theocrats, anti-pot crusaders and anti-immigrant alt-righters.

  21. avatar Maxi says:

    Why would one fear the government?
    To find the answer, open a history book. Any history book. USSR, China, Germany, whatever. Pick the country you like the most (or the least). If it has a government, that government got people killed.
    I like my life. Case closed.

  22. avatar Ralph says:

    Frederica Wilson. John Conyers. Maxine Waters. These are just three of the hundreds of reasons that I fear government.

    Government is nothing more than a criminal conspiracy of professional grifters, and some of them are completely insane.

  23. avatar DaveL says:

    Think for a minute about how much people trust lawyers.

    Now think for a minute about how much people trust politicians.

    Think for a minute about how much people trust bureaucrats.

    Think for a minute about how much people trust lobbyists.

    Okay, now give them a SWAT team. Any questions?

  24. avatar oldandshaky says:

    The above-average citizen believes in freedom.
    The below-average citizen believes in license.
    The above-average government believes in control.
    The below-average government believes in power.

  25. avatar ironicatbest says:

    Not why I fear the government, but why does my government fear me? ….. If I could choke these adds pop-ups, my hands would be sore.

  26. avatar Kevin says:

    April 19, 1775 – Lexington and Concord, MA.

    That’s why.

  27. avatar Specialist38 says:

    The question should be “Why does the government fear it’s own citizens”?

    Where the government fears the people – you have liberty.

    Where the people fear the government – you have tyranny.

    It is just that simple….

    1. avatar Ralph says:

      Where the government fears the people – you have mass murder of the people by the government.

  28. avatar Pg2 says:

    Wrong question. Why does the Government fear gun owners?

  29. avatar Nanashi says:

    02/19/1942

    1. avatar Brandan says:

      @Nanashi, good pull. And yet FDR has largely received a pass on that most egregious violation of American civil liberties and is still treated as a saint by the left. Could you imagine how history would have treated such an action via the pen of a Republican president? Fun fact, one of the few to publicly speak out against Executive Order 9066 was a member of the GOP, Colorado governor Ralph Carr:

      “They are as loyal to American institutions as you and I. Many of them have been born here–are American citizens, with no connection or feeling of loyalty toward the customs and philosophies of Italy, Germany and Japan…. I am not talking on behalf of Japanese, of Italians, or of Germans as such when I say this. I am talking to … all American people whether their status be white, brown or black and regardless of the birthplaces of their grandfathers when I say that if a majority may deprive a minority of its freedom, contrary to the terms of the Constitution today, then you as a minority may be subjected to the same ill-will of the majority tomorrow.”

      1. avatar tiger says:

        Herbert Hoover sending tanks to run off WW1 vets is equally as bad as FDR’s sins.

  30. avatar Pg2 says:

    When you have Government health agencies that support and partake in experimentation on children, asking for trust is a tall order.

  31. avatar Red Storm says:

    “I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States and against all enemies, foreign or domestic….” Emphasis on domestic! That was part of the oath when I joined the Army. Just saying !

    1. avatar tiger says:

      And Men who took that same oath put down the Bonus March of 1932 by force. In the case of Patton & MacArthur; men they had led in battle just years before.

  32. avatar sound awake says:

    “Wooten’s 18-page report discussed some of what he witnessed during his three-year investigation, such as a BLM agent’s “kill list” featuring people who had committed suicide while under investigation by the agency, BLM agents and officials referring to the Bundys as “retards” and “douche bags,” agents bragging about “grinding” a Bundy family member’s face into gravel, and lead prosecutor and Nevada’s acting U.S. Attorney Steve Myhre’s “preferred ignorance” of investigation details that would benefit the Bundys’ defense case.

    Former Special Agent Dan Love, who was in charge of impounding Cliven Bundy’s cattle in 2014, conducted “the most intrusive, oppressive, large scale and militaristic trespass cattle impound possible” against Bundy’s ranch against the direction of the U.S. attorney’s office, according to Wooten. The Bundys’ defense strategy accuses the BLM of using overly-aggressive and threatening tactics.”

    http://dailycaller.com/2017/12/18/report-fed-agency-committed-militaristic-operation-against-nevada-rancher/

  33. avatar sound awake says:

    Weaver Awarded $3.1 Million from US Government

    The following was pieced together from printed reports of Ruby Ridge, a Prime Time Live show detailing the events of Ruby Ridge, and the Weaver and Harris transcripts of the trial.

    While admitting no wrong, the US Government settled suits filed by the Weaver family over the killing of his 14 year old son and his wife by federal law enforcement officials at Ruby Ridge in Northern Idaho. The payment settles claims filed by Weaver and his two daughters. The original claims totaled $200 million. The Justice Department released a statement on the day they agreed to the settlement that said in part: “The settlement reflects the loss to the Weaver children of their mother and brother. By entering into a settlement, the United States hopes to take a substantial step toward healing the wounds the incident inflicted.”

    https://www.firearmsandliberty.com/ruby2.html

  34. avatar sound awake says:

    On about August 24, 1992, the fourth day of the siege on the Weaver family, FBI Deputy Assistant Director Danny Coulson, who was unaware that Vicki Weaver had been killed,[109] wrote a memo with the following content:

    Something to Consider

    1. Charge against Weaver is Bull Shit.
    2. No one saw Weaver do any shooting.
    3. Vicki has no charges against her.
    4. Weaver’s defense. He ran down the hill to see what dog was barking at. Some guys in camys shot his dog. Started shooting at him. Killed his son. Harris did the shooting [of Degan]. He [Weaver] is in pretty strong legal position.[110]

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_Ridge

  35. avatar sound awake says:

    Weaver was ultimately acquitted of all charges except missing his original court date and violating his bail conditions, for which he was sentenced to 18 months and fined $10,000;[1] credited with time served, Weaver spent an additional 4 months in prison.[citation needed] Kevin Harris was defended by attorney David Niven and was acquitted of all charges.[73]

    The surviving members of the Weaver family filed a wrongful death suit for $200 million. In an out-of-court settlement in August 1995, the federal government awarded Randy Weaver $100,000 and his three daughters $1 million each. The government did not admit any wrongdoing in the deaths of Sammy and Vicki.[120][121] On the condition of anonymity, a DOJ official told the Washington Post that he believed the Weavers probably would have won the full amount if the case had gone to trial.[63]

    The attorney for Kevin Harris pressed Harris’s civil suit for damages, although federal officials vowed they would never pay someone who had killed a U.S. Marshal. In September 2000, after persistent appeals, Harris was awarded a $380,000 settlement from the government.[127]

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_Ridge

    THE US FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WAS SO FAR OVER THE LINE THAT NOT ONLY COULD THEY NOT SEE THE LINE WITH A 10 FOOT LADDER AND A PAIR OF 10X32 BINOCULARS BUT THEY ALSO HAD TO PAY A US CITIZEN THAT KILLED A US MARSHALL $380,000

  36. Two words…
    Ruby Ridge

  37. avatar Don says:

    Because the government and their armed enforcers (the cops, and military) are the only thing that is going to take away your rights and confiscate your property by force.

  38. avatar Chris T from KY says:

    The government is afraid of blacks. Then the government became afraid of Mormons. Then the government became afraid of Italians.

    Why do government school teachers need grenade launchers and tanks??? Why are they afraid of school children???

    Athens Tennessee revolt
    The mulford Act
    Ruby Ridge
    The Branch Davidians
    The Bundy Ranch
    400 years of racist gun control laws.
    The pulse night club
    Kate Steinle
    Carol Bowne
    Benghazi, they also asked for help from the government.

    I have many reasons why I don’t trust the government.

  39. avatar Nelson says:

    History: got #DEMOCIDE much?

    xD

    http://www.hawaii.edu/powerkills/MURDER.HTM

    You can literally add-up ALL the murders committed by all the NON-state murderers in the entire history of the world, and their kills won’t even come close to the INDUSTRIAL, MASS-MURDER committed by govtS.

    That, is why.

    You’d literally have to be a worthless govt terrorist, neocon, RINO, commie SJW statist to delude otherwise.

  40. avatar Sam I Am says:

    Question: Why doesn’t any breathing, thinking person fear government (incompetence, inefficiency, tyrannical propensity, and so on)?

    1. avatar Raoul Duke says:

      They fear inconvenience, utterly incapable of taking care of themselves, and honestly believe the government protects them!

      Oh and the “it can never happen here” effect cause “‘Murica’, we are a ‘free’ country so it will never be like Nazi Germany!”. That is the saddest part that our schools have brainwashed these morons to think that the Nazi regime is the only tyrannical government to exist so they only recognize that as such. They have whitewashed all other “evil” regimes except maybe the South during the Civil War as the most evil governments on Earth ignoring all the other terrible ones like the Communists.

      To put it simply, people are morons!

  41. avatar Survivordude1090 says:

    I don’t “fear” the government. I just understand that at the end of the day, the macro-social entity that is the Government of the United States of America DOES NOT GIVE ONE DAMN ABOUT ME. To the government, I’m nothing more than a number on a spreadsheet with corresponding tax revenue figures. The moment I start screwing with those numbers is the moment they send black helicopters, SWAT teams, and tanks after me, capture me, force me to pay, then send me to jail for twenty years. As long as I pay my taxes, the government is content. Every other time, they don’t care what happens to me. Hell, if someone were to murder me, the government sees that someone who ended a stream of money, and will punish in a way that’s most cost effective . It not about justice. It’s all about money.

    The police have no obligation to protect me. People want me dead or enslaved for simply existing. It’s me (or you) against the world. The government has no interest in helping.

    1. avatar Raoul Duke says:

      This guy gets it!

  42. avatar John says:

    I don’t fear the long arm of the law as is, but I do fear how unstable Congress is.

  43. avatar neiowa says:

    “Hello this is CBS with some questions about guns”

    WHAT response (honest) if any do you think will be provided.

  44. avatar Chip in Florida says:

    Why do they always project their insecurities onto others? Why is the question pinned on ‘fear?’ Why does me owning a tool have to equate to fearing something?

    1. avatar Sam I Am says:

      Because gun owners wear no identification tab. That means you may be walking around with your hidden 2A tool one day and simply snap and go on a shooting spree. The anti-gun crowd cannot separate you from the crowd, and avoid being around you when you do snap. The anti-gun gang believe themselves to be both nice people, and reasonable people. They reasonably fear the unknown character that may just end their lives in a blink.

      1. avatar Ansel Hazen says:

        “That means you may be walking around with your hidden 2A tool one day and simply snap and go on a shooting spree.”

        Odd that such events are done by people who aren’t responsible law abiding gun owners. What the anti-gun crowd can’t admit is that the Stephen Willeford’s of the world make everyone safer. I’m sorry anti’s are afraid but it’s their own damn fault.

        1. avatar Sam I Am says:

          Fear can be a powerful motivator. Why do we allow the gun grabbers a monopoly? We should fear eternal battle over constitutionally protected RTKBA. We should be fearful that all our advances can be overturned by mere legislation or court ruling. We should be fearful that anti-gunners own the media, the entertainment and the education system. We should fear not being able to make our case to enough people such that any attempt to tamper with the second amendment should spell political doom.

  45. avatar DrewR says:

    I do not fear the Government, I certainly don’t trust them. Anyone confused as to why hasn’t been paying attention at any point in the last 10,000 years or so.

  46. avatar David Thompson says:

    Two words: Andrew. Cuomo.

  47. avatar Aaron M. Walker says:

    Did we just have Senate inquiries not to long ago about CIA/NSA, and other “Shadow Ops-Rogue government agencies ” violating the US Constitutional-Bill of Rights by Spying on American Citizens!!!! Hello!!!! And Now, Fake News from all the Major Corporate News media agencies as well!!! Hello!!! We’re still all living in Dangerous times…Ready to go off the deep end suddenly at a moments notice!

  48. avatar RMS1911 says:

    Most people carry for the rightful concern over violent democrats assaulting them.
    Most of the violent inmates in prison are democrats.

  49. avatar Timothy says:

    I fear getting in a car crash, so I purchase insurance. I fear tickets, so I don’t break driving laws (too much). I fear kitchen fires, so I have a fire extinguisher. I fear government overreach, so I own guns and participate. I fear divorce, so I don’t cheat on my wife. I fear being homeless and having my kids grow up in a cardboard box in the rain, so I have a job.

    None of these fears are crippling me with insecurity and anxiety. All are things and hundreds more than I care to list are things that I can prevent or mitigate.

  50. avatar adverse5 says:

    I don’t fear the government. Why does the government fear legally, so far, armed citizens?

  51. WHY?
    THE OBVIOUS ANSWER IS KNOWLEDGE OF HISTORY: THOSE WHO ARE IGNORANT OF HISTORY INVARIABLY ARE DOOMED TO ALLOW THE REPEATrf SUFFERING; THAT BY ALLOWING THE OF DANGERS OF THE PAST TO BE REPEATED OVER AND OVER AGAIN.

    HUMANS BY THEIR VERY NATURE ARE EVIL AND THUS CORRUPT AND THUS GOVERNMENT IN EVERY FORM IS CORRUPT, THE DEGREE OF CORRUPTNESS THE ONLY VARIABLE.

    Politicians and Bureaucrats being human and thus with their attendant propensity for evil and consequently of corruptness; and yet again the only variable being the degree of corruptness, i.e. evil.
    Jeffrey Snyder’s “A Nation of Cowards” presents in minute detail the basic weakness present in we humans that allows ourselves to be susceptible to government tyranny.
    Jeffery Snyder rather lengthy and thus comprehensive study sets forth an easily understood basis for mankind susceptibility allowing us to be duped into becoming what is nothing more than the subject, the slaves of rogue government under the always inherit laws/registration conjured up by lawmaker in their continues gave of ‘one-upmanship; this latter game that lawyers play observed first hand over our 35 years of investigations done for clients and their attorneys; this game of one-upmanship played with whatever laws serve their intended purpose.
    Our Creator, Our Triune God provided us with HIS TEN COMMANDMENTS; each simplified to degree that each is simple and thus easily understood.
    If you have ever been in your local law library you if you are attentive can easily observe the shelves of books of laws and if astute know that they constitute only a minute number; a whole building required in our nation’s capital to house the tooms of volumes of laws that are added to daily.
    Among those almost unlimited number of laws can be found one or more laws that allow the provision of another law under with an action is being brought.
    Only Christians and only a few Christian at that understand and appreciate that be it only a limited extent the gross adverse ‘contribution’ that the Sadducees and Pharisees, the lawyers of that day and time, who were guilty of fostering on the Jewish people of that day . . . although they were the evil tool* utilized in the crucifixion of our Lord Jesus Christ; our Heavenly Father, our Creator utilizing these evil ones to provide each of us who have ever lived or who will live with the only means available to receive the Grace, the Unmerited Favor, that through the Blood Sacrifice on the Cross of Calvary of His Only Son, Jesus Christ.
    *Footnote: In our modern day and time Our Triune God continues to utilize the evil ones among us to accomplish His Purposes, they thought admittedly an abomination at the very least, they are useful in the final analysis in finally serving as an unknowing tool in accomplishing finally a noble end.

  52. THE PRIMARY REASON FOR ALWAYS BEING ARMED IS TOTALLY OBVIOUS EXCEPT TO THOSE THAT MIGHT BE ‘BLISSFULLY IGNORANT’; THAT PRIMARY REASON BEING THE ABILITY TO DEFEND ONE’s SELF, I.E ONE’S FAMILY AND LOVED ONES FROM GOVERNMENT. THAT TRUTH HAS BEEN REPEATED VALIDATED OVER THE MILLENNIUM OF OUR HISTORY HOWEVER A MAJOR PROBLEM IS THE IGNORANCE BY THE MULTITUDES OF THAT HISTORY.
    THE BRITISH MARCHED TO LEXINGTON AND CONCORD TO ACCOMPLISH WHAT?
    TO CONFISCATE POWDER, LEAD, LEAD BALLS, AND FLINTS ALONG WITH THE WEAPONS WITH WHICH THEY WERE USED: THE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION THAT WERE THE TOOLS THAT WOULD CONSTITUTE AN EVER PRESENT THREAT TO THEIR ABILITY TO SUPPRESS, TO SURROGATE THE COLONIST TO THE STATUS OF A VASSEL STATE ON WHICH THE MONARCHY PREVAILED.

  53. avatar tiger says:

    Why do we fear the Government?”
    Answer: I watched them shoot 1,000 rounds into a row home. Drop a bomb of c-4 on said home; then they let the home & 62 others burn down & kill 11 people.

    I also remember Waco & Ruby Ridge.

    1. avatar Sam I Am says:

      And then came the third American revolution, right?

  54. avatar oliver says:

    Question of the day, “Why does the government fear gun owners?”

    There, fixed it.

    1. avatar Sam I Am says:

      Question of the Day: “WHEN does government fear gun owners?”

      “Fixed” it again.

  55. avatar Roy F. Wilt says:

    I guess that it started with the British in the 1700’s!!!!!!!!!!!!!!? Since 1900 over 200 million people have been Murdered by their Governments! Why don’t we trust our Government? Hell! We trust NO Government! Most of the effort to take our weapons are by people who would like to kill us if we decide that we don’t agree with them!!!!!!!!!!

  56. avatar Model 31 says:

    this lady who did nothing wrong in a majority of other states

  57. avatar Johnny108 says:

    “Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force; like fire, a troublesome servant
    and a fearful master. Never for a moment should it be left to irresponsible action.”
    -George Washington, in a speech of January 7, 1790

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