Liberte Austin’s Hunting Digest: Creative Poacher Punishment, Lucky Coyotes and a TSA Surprise

Judge orders Texas man caught poaching to spend weekends during deer season in jail

courtesy cbsaustin.com

Texas is getting creative on punishing poachers and it’s awesome. . . Texas man who poached white-tailed buck will have to spend every weekend of hunting season in jail

A man who poached a white-tailed buck on private property will have to spend every weekend of the deer hunting season in jail for the next five years, Texas Parks and Wildlife officials said.

A Grayson County district court judge ordered the sentence for 34-year-old Whitesboro resident John Walker Drinnon. The sentence begins Dec. 30. He will also be prohibited from buying a hunting license while he’s on probation, the department said. …

He pleaded guilty in October to taking the whitetail deer without landowner consent, the department said. As part of his sentence he was ordered to repay $18,048.10 in restitution for the deer.

Alberta has 2,500 cougars: Biologist says hunting them is ethical and legal

Why is this even a question? . . . Alberta has 2,500 cougars: Biologist says hunting them is ethical and legal

An investigation into the hunt of a large cougar by a television show host in Alberta has determined it was legal, says the province.

Steve Ecklund, host of the outdoor show The Edge, bragged about hunting the big cat in early December. He triggered outrage online when he posted several photos of him holding the dead cougar and another of him making a stir-fry from the meat.

Environment officials said Thursday that they investigated after receiving complaints from the public about Ecklund’s hunt of the male cat in an area between Rocky Mountain House and Drayton Valley in east-central Alberta.

The S.C. Department of Natural Resources announced Thursday that the reward is part of the state’s Coyote Harvest Incentive Program, according WSPA. DNR officials said 16 coyotes have already been tagged and released this year, Fox Carolina reported. Another eight coyotes released in 2016 have not been caught yet either. Hunters must save the carcass for verification to get the free hunting license, Fox Carolina reported.

Ahhhhh, it’s like a coyote Easter egg hunt. . . Killing one of these animals will get you a lifetime SC hunting license

State officials are offering a complimentary lifetime hunting license to those who kill one of 24 tagged coyotes in South Carolina.

The S.C. Department of Natural Resources announced Thursday that the reward is part of the state’s Coyote Harvest Incentive Program, according WSPA.

DNR officials said 16 coyotes have already been tagged and released this year, Fox Carolina reported. Another eight coyotes released in 2016 have not been caught yet either.

Hunters must save the carcass for verification to get the free hunting license, Fox Carolina reported.
Coyotes first appeared in South Carolina in the Upstate in 1978 and have spread statewide every since, WSPA reported. They impact deer and small game populations.
A Sacramento County man entered a no contest plea Tuesday to charges of poaching a huge blacktail deer in Sacramento County.   John Frederick Kautz, 51, of Lodi, was charged with possession of an illegally poached deer and falsification of deer tag reporting information, both misdemeanors, following a three-month investigation.   Kautz illegally killed the trophy-sized buck on private property in Wilton in December 2016, two months after the deer season closed in the area. The deer had an antler spread of 31 inches with four antler points on one side and five on the other, which is an unusually large size for this part of California.
Sounds like a deer conspiracy. I want to know who this man’s taxidermist is. Cheater, cheater, pumpkin eater. . . Massive Poached California Deer Leads to Trophy Penalty Enhancement
A Sacramento County man entered a no contest plea Tuesday to charges of poaching a huge blacktail deer in Sacramento County.
John Frederick Kautz, 51, of Lodi, was charged with possession of an illegally poached deer and falsification of deer tag reporting information, both misdemeanors, following a three-month investigation.
Kautz illegally killed the trophy-sized buck on private property in Wilton in December 2016, two months after the deer season closed in the area. The deer had an antler spread of 31 inches with four antler points on one side and five on the other, which is an unusually large size for this part of California.
Kautz transported the illegally killed deer across state lines to Nevada to have the deer head mounted by a taxidermist. Kautz was also working through the process of scoring the trophy class buck to have it entered into the Safari Club International hunting record book.

continent.   There are plenty of concerns about how wise it is to carry hunting rifles into densely populated cities to shoot canines. But beyond the risks to innocent bystanders and the debate over whether growing urban coyote populations even pose a serious threat to humans, there’s one critical fact that we must keep in mind when deciding if we should hunt urban coyotes: Doing so will likely just make the problem worse.   According to the Times: Some carnivore ecologists argue, though, that moving the hunt into cities will be self-defeating. They say it replicates the very tactics that have allowed coyotes to prosper despite a concerted onslaught against them. In an adaptation that biologists call fission-fusion, when coyotes come under pressure from hunters, their packs split up into lone animals and pairs, they start producing much larger litters, and they migrate into new areas.Coyotes are notorious for rapidly adapting to changing circumstances.

Yeah, I’m not sure if I want to see hunters stalking coyotes in public parks. Strange men with guns in public places can be mistaken for bogey men and get shot by mistake by concealed handgun carriers. . . Hunting Coyotes in Cities Only Makes Coyote Populations Grow
Cities have a coyote problem. As the New York Times reported on Tuesday, hunters are increasingly trying to manage the urban coyote populations that have merged with human communities as the latter has spread throughout the continent.
There are plenty of concerns about how wise it is to carry hunting rifles into densely populated cities to shoot canines. But beyond the risks to innocent bystanders and the debate over whether growing urban coyote populations even pose a serious threat to humans, there’s one critical fact that we must keep in mind when deciding if we should hunt urban coyotes: Doing so will likely just make the problem worse.
According to the Times: Some carnivore ecologists argue, though, that moving the hunt into cities will be self-defeating. They say it replicates the very tactics that have allowed coyotes to prosper despite a concerted onslaught against them. In an adaptation that biologists call fission-fusion, when coyotes come under pressure from hunters, their packs split up into lone animals and pairs, they start producing much larger litters, and they migrate into new areas.Coyotes are notorious for rapidly adapting to changing circumstances.

comments

  1. avatar jwm says:

    Quail season ends at the end of January. Then I will have the full camo, make up, e caller and rifle out for yotes. If they increase their litters under hunting pressure then they are a very renewable resource.

  2. avatar Hank says:

    That’s a damn big cat.

  3. avatar BLoving says:

    Never hunted coyote, either urban or otherwise…
    As I understand it: any hunter crafty and stealthy enough to have a prayer of getting one needn’t worry about being spotted by a mere human… our species does not have senses and instincts like that – let alone the yanks with their noses stuck to their phones 24/7.

    1. avatar Specialist38 says:

      They are wary, but greedy. Patience and stillness are more important than camoflauge. 22 mag does the job within 50 yards, 223 out to a 100 for me. I don go past 100.

  4. avatar Blurb says:

    I’m going to assume that stir-fry was heavily seasoned.

    1. avatar Philthegardner says:

      EXACTLY MY THOUGHTS! To be fair, I’ve never eaten that type of predator meat but ‘ve heard enough about it and smelled it to not even consider eating it.

    2. avatar Specialist38 says:

      I have eaten African lion. If Cougar is similar, i would rather eat my boots.

    3. avatar Red in CO says:

      Why do you guys say that? Is big cat meat significantly different from other kinds of meat? (This may be a dumb question, but I have absolutely zero knowledge of the subject if that wasn’t obvious)

      1. avatar TrappedInCommiefornia says:

        From what I’ve heard/read, carnivore meat is generally not very good.

  5. avatar Matthew the Oilman says:

    Wait, you used the N.Y.T. as a source for the urban coyote hunting study. Pravda wasn’t available? I am not saying hunting in a urban environment is or is not a good thing, but the Times should never be used as a source with out independent verification.

  6. avatar Lance F says:

    I have taken many deer through the airlines, and never had a problem. They were packaged and frozen though. At least one head with antlers was on one flight so I could do a European mount.

  7. avatar Wabs says:

    That cougar is big enough to take down more than an average count of 1 deer or elk a week. Let’s see that means 8 a month x 12 =96 deer /elk a year saved. Even half that saved sounds good. It’s also a known fact that the cougars and wolves kills just because they can, and not just for food. At least the cats know how to do the killing faster by way of neck attack. I do not like either animal. I believe theires enough ways for wildlife to balance out without them.I do not hunt.

    1. avatar Wayne Reimer says:

      I live within an hour of where this cat was taken, and spend a lot of time in the bush IN that area as a member of a Search and rescue team. The cougar population up here has gone crazy the last few years; one small town (2000 population) had to tranquillize and remove 27 of them from within the town in the last year; a local rancher lost 17 head of horses to a female with two cums in a five month period nearby. !0 years ago, coyote numbers were the menace; now it’s cougars. I’ve seen more than a dozen of them this year alone, and there are a LOT of big cats. Eklunds Tom is a healthy size, but not by any means huge…there are plenty around this size and bigger. They make me way more nervous than bears do. Bears will generally beat feet when they hear or smell you, cats won’t. With the amount of pressure their increasing numbers have placed on the ungulate populations, they are getting hungry, and starting to prey more on livestock and domestic animals..a big concern.

      1. avatar tsbhoa.p.jr says:

        “a local rancher lost 17 head of horses to a female with two cums in a five month period”

        supply and demand. sounds like damn good ~pu**y~.

  8. avatar Big Bill says:

    If you’ve ever eaten at a Chinese restaurant…
    (for the humor-impaired, that’s a joke.)

  9. avatar The Rookie says:

    Cougar stir-fry?

    That…does not sound tasty.

  10. avatar DJ says:

    I knew a guy that knew a trapper in Ca. who had eaten the back straps from a bobcat. He said that those tasted good…

  11. avatar Jim Bullock says:

    “But police Lt. David Gordon told the Las Vegas Review-Journal that Transportation Security Administration agents held the man at McCarran International Airport late Tuesday to confirm the validity of the Utah hunting tag.”

    What does this have to do with terrorism?

    I didn’t know cougar carcasses were explosive. Maybe they only go boom with a pressure switch? Or the guy & his friends might hijack the plane with “claw cutters.”

    Where’s the terrorism charge against this guy? He was on the “watch but don’t stop” list? Existing warrants? Known terrorist affiliates?

    Post a disaster their existing surveillance, screening, and counter measures didn’t stop, we give them limited additional mandates they insist they need or it’ll happen again. They also pinky-swear this stuff will only be used to “keep us safe” from terrorists blowing up airplanes.

    Then, when they find anything they think is weird they hold you however long they feel like & check with everybody else in the country to see if there’s maybe something they can charge you with. It’s like driving in New Jersey.

    But what do you expect from an “administration” that notes they took ~4,000 guns from citizens who are not terrorists last year, and area all excited that they’ll be doing the same thing next year. So, people who are only “criminal” but not really, as they don’t go to jail, because of the TSA’s rituals.

    It’s like imposing on people who haven’t done anything wrong is the point. (Which it is. The press if for their sponsors, Bloomie & his ilk, to show that if you can’t get em one way, here’s another.)

    1. avatar ozzallos says:

      Srsly dude. I would be wondering why your cat isn’t on ice instead of being left to decay as a biological hazard for your fellow passengers to encounter, thanks for asking. That said, I’ll bet it more went like this–

      “Shit, what’s that in the bag?”
      “Beats the fuck out of me. Check it out.”
      “Okay. Holy shit, it’s a cat!”
      “A cat? Like Garfield?”
      “No, dumbass, a huge fucking cat!”
      “Is it alive?”
      “Looks pretty dead to me.”
      “Whoa. Okay. You think the airlines are okay with this?”
      “Last I checked, our SOP didn’t have a section for huge fucking cats.”
      “Alright, stop being a dick. I’m calling up the airlines.”
      -several minutes later-
      “Hey guys, what– Holy shit, that’s a huge fucking cat!”
      “That’s what I said, sherlock.”
      “Don’t they normally put these things on ice?”
      “Yeah, kinda. What do you want done with it?”
      “Uhh… fuck, that’s a good question. Is it, um, leaking?”
      “Dude, you want to move it around to check?”
      “Ah, right. Is this shit even legal?”
      “Look, we just look for bombs. Give us an up or down here.”
      “Ah, right… Let me make a few calls first…”

      And away we go.

  12. avatar M. Atkinson says:

    Asians have been eating cats and dogs for centuries, can’t be that bad, of course I have never tried either one, I would give it a try though.

  13. avatar Chris T from KY says:

    I know there is a increasing problem of wild animals in cities. But I can’t bring myself to click on a NYT web site. I simply don’t trust what they say on any subject.

  14. avatar KeeboardKommando says:

    Mmmm…ate plenty of cougar kitty in my younger days. That’s good eatin’.

  15. avatar John Fritz HMFIC says:

    A man who poached a white-tailed buck on private property will have to spend every weekend of the deer hunting season in jail for the next five years, Texas Parks and Wildlife officials said. …

    So is this a felony conviction then? Not many days total served to complete sentence but > one year. Guess if it is he won’t have to worry about breaking any hunting laws any more.

    Or about cleaning any guns.

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