Ruger Introduces the Ruger Precision Rimfire Rifle

Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. (NYSE-RGR) is proud to introduce the Ruger Precision™ Rimfire rifle. Bringing the big-gun experience to the rimfire world, the Ruger Precision Rimfire is a scaled down version of the Ruger Precision Rifle® and maintains the same ergonomics, trigger and manual of arms as the larger centerfire rifle. The Ruger Precision Rimfire is the ideal long-range shooting trainer and go-to rifle for your next rimfire match. The Ruger Precision Rimfire features a molded, one-piece chassis and adjustable buttstock assembly manufactured from glass-filled nylon for strength, stiffness and stability, offering a solid foundation for accuracy each and every shot. The innovative Quick-Fit adjustable Precision Rimfire stock allows the rifle's length of pull and comb height to be quickly and easily adjusted for proper fit over a wide range of shooter sizes, outerwear and shooting positions. Indicating marks molded into the chassis help you quickly return to a previous position. To make the .22 LR chambering feel more like 6.5 Creedmoor, Ruger engineers designed the Big-Gun adjustable bolt throw technology. By simply removing a spring clip, shooters can change from a rimfire 1-1/2" bolt throw to a short-action centerfire 3" bolt throw, reducing the chance of short-stroking the bolt in competition. Identical to the Ruger Precision Rifle, the oversized bolt handle makes for positive bolt manipulation. The rifle's 18" target barrel is cold hammer-forged from 4140 alloy steel to create ultra-precise rifling for excellent accuracy. The 1/2"-28 thread pattern allows for easy pairing with the Silent-SR® suppressor or other muzzle devices. The 15" hard black anodized aluminum, free-float handguard features Magpul® M-LOK® slots on all four sides for improved scope clearance and easy mounting of M-LOK-compatible rails and accessories. The popular Ruger Marksman Adjustable™ trigger has a pull weight range of 2.25 to 5.0 pounds; the adjusting wrench is conveniently stored in a buttstock compartment on the rifle. Ruger's own AR-pattern pistol grip and safety selector allow for maximum control and access to the 45 degree, reversible safety selector. The Precision Rimfire ships with one, 15-round BX-15® magazine or two, 10-round BX-1 magazines. For increased long-range elevation capabilities, the rifle is topped with a 30 MOA Picatinny scope base. For more information on the Ruger Precision Rimfire or to learn more about the extensive line of award-winning Ruger firearms, visit Ruger.com or Facebook.com/Ruger. To find accessories for the Ruger Precision Rimfire and other Ruger firearms, visit ShopRuger.com or your local independent retailer of Ruger firearms.

Ruger is releasing an extension to their very successful Precision Rifle line, this time in a much cheaper caliber. The .22lr rifle uses existing 10/22 magazines, which is great for gun owners since that means spares are immediately available and dirt cheap. MSRP: $529.

From Ruger’s press release:

Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. (NYSE-RGR) is proud to introduce the Ruger Precision™ Rimfire rifle. Bringing the big-gun experience to the rimfire world, the Ruger Precision Rimfire is a scaled down version of the Ruger Precision Rifle® and maintains the same ergonomics, trigger and manual of arms as the larger centerfire rifle. The Ruger Precision Rimfire is the ideal long-range shooting trainer and go-to rifle for your next rimfire match.

Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. (NYSE-RGR) is proud to introduce the Ruger Precision™ Rimfire rifle. Bringing the big-gun experience to the rimfire world, the Ruger Precision Rimfire is a scaled down version of the Ruger Precision Rifle® and maintains the same ergonomics, trigger and manual of arms as the larger centerfire rifle. The Ruger Precision Rimfire is the ideal long-range shooting trainer and go-to rifle for your next rimfire match. The Ruger Precision Rimfire features a molded, one-piece chassis and adjustable buttstock assembly manufactured from glass-filled nylon for strength, stiffness and stability, offering a solid foundation for accuracy each and every shot. The innovative Quick-Fit adjustable Precision Rimfire stock allows the rifle's length of pull and comb height to be quickly and easily adjusted for proper fit over a wide range of shooter sizes, outerwear and shooting positions. Indicating marks molded into the chassis help you quickly return to a previous position. To make the .22 LR chambering feel more like 6.5 Creedmoor, Ruger engineers designed the Big-Gun adjustable bolt throw technology. By simply removing a spring clip, shooters can change from a rimfire 1-1/2" bolt throw to a short-action centerfire 3" bolt throw, reducing the chance of short-stroking the bolt in competition. Identical to the Ruger Precision Rifle, the oversized bolt handle makes for positive bolt manipulation. The rifle's 18" target barrel is cold hammer-forged from 4140 alloy steel to create ultra-precise rifling for excellent accuracy. The 1/2"-28 thread pattern allows for easy pairing with the Silent-SR® suppressor or other muzzle devices. The 15" hard black anodized aluminum, free-float handguard features Magpul® M-LOK® slots on all four sides for improved scope clearance and easy mounting of M-LOK-compatible rails and accessories. The popular Ruger Marksman Adjustable™ trigger has a pull weight range of 2.25 to 5.0 pounds; the adjusting wrench is conveniently stored in a buttstock compartment on the rifle. Ruger's own AR-pattern pistol grip and safety selector allow for maximum control and access to the 45 degree, reversible safety selector. The Precision Rimfire ships with one, 15-round BX-15® magazine or two, 10-round BX-1 magazines. For increased long-range elevation capabilities, the rifle is topped with a 30 MOA Picatinny scope base. For more information on the Ruger Precision Rimfire or to learn more about the extensive line of award-winning Ruger firearms, visit Ruger.com or Facebook.com/Ruger. To find accessories for the Ruger Precision Rimfire and other Ruger firearms, visit ShopRuger.com or your local independent retailer of Ruger firearms.

The Ruger Precision Rimfire features a molded, one-piece chassis and adjustable buttstock assembly manufactured from glass-filled nylon for strength, stiffness and stability, offering a solid foundation for accuracy each and every shot. The innovative Quick-Fit adjustable Precision Rimfire stock allows the rifle’s length of pull and comb height to be quickly and easily adjusted for proper fit over a wide range of shooter sizes, outerwear and shooting positions. Indicating marks molded into the chassis help you quickly return to a previous position.

To make the .22 LR chambering feel more like 6.5 Creedmoor, Ruger engineers designed the Big-Gun adjustable bolt throw technology. By simply removing a spring clip, shooters can change from a rimfire 1-1/2″ bolt throw to a short-action centerfire 3″ bolt throw, reducing the chance of short-stroking the bolt in competition. Identical to the Ruger Precision Rifle, the oversized bolt handle makes for positive bolt manipulation.

Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. (NYSE-RGR) is proud to introduce the Ruger Precision™ Rimfire rifle. Bringing the big-gun experience to the rimfire world, the Ruger Precision Rimfire is a scaled down version of the Ruger Precision Rifle® and maintains the same ergonomics, trigger and manual of arms as the larger centerfire rifle. The Ruger Precision Rimfire is the ideal long-range shooting trainer and go-to rifle for your next rimfire match. The Ruger Precision Rimfire features a molded, one-piece chassis and adjustable buttstock assembly manufactured from glass-filled nylon for strength, stiffness and stability, offering a solid foundation for accuracy each and every shot. The innovative Quick-Fit adjustable Precision Rimfire stock allows the rifle's length of pull and comb height to be quickly and easily adjusted for proper fit over a wide range of shooter sizes, outerwear and shooting positions. Indicating marks molded into the chassis help you quickly return to a previous position. To make the .22 LR chambering feel more like 6.5 Creedmoor, Ruger engineers designed the Big-Gun adjustable bolt throw technology. By simply removing a spring clip, shooters can change from a rimfire 1-1/2" bolt throw to a short-action centerfire 3" bolt throw, reducing the chance of short-stroking the bolt in competition. Identical to the Ruger Precision Rifle, the oversized bolt handle makes for positive bolt manipulation. The rifle's 18" target barrel is cold hammer-forged from 4140 alloy steel to create ultra-precise rifling for excellent accuracy. The 1/2"-28 thread pattern allows for easy pairing with the Silent-SR® suppressor or other muzzle devices. The 15" hard black anodized aluminum, free-float handguard features Magpul® M-LOK® slots on all four sides for improved scope clearance and easy mounting of M-LOK-compatible rails and accessories. The popular Ruger Marksman Adjustable™ trigger has a pull weight range of 2.25 to 5.0 pounds; the adjusting wrench is conveniently stored in a buttstock compartment on the rifle. Ruger's own AR-pattern pistol grip and safety selector allow for maximum control and access to the 45 degree, reversible safety selector. The Precision Rimfire ships with one, 15-round BX-15® magazine or two, 10-round BX-1 magazines. For increased long-range elevation capabilities, the rifle is topped with a 30 MOA Picatinny scope base. For more information on the Ruger Precision Rimfire or to learn more about the extensive line of award-winning Ruger firearms, visit Ruger.com or Facebook.com/Ruger. To find accessories for the Ruger Precision Rimfire and other Ruger firearms, visit ShopRuger.com or your local independent retailer of Ruger firearms.

The rifle’s 18″ target barrel is cold hammer-forged from 4140 alloy steel to create ultra-precise rifling for excellent accuracy. The 1/2″-28 thread pattern allows for easy pairing with the Silent-SR® suppressor or other muzzle devices. The 15″ hard black anodized aluminum, free-float handguard features Magpul® M-LOK® slots on all four sides for improved scope clearance and easy mounting of M-LOK-compatible rails and accessories.

The popular Ruger Marksman Adjustable™ trigger has a pull weight range of 2.25 to 5.0 pounds; the adjusting wrench is conveniently stored in a buttstock compartment on the rifle. Ruger’s own AR-pattern pistol grip and safety selector allow for maximum control and access to the 45 degree, reversible safety selector.

The Precision Rimfire ships with one, 15-round BX-15® magazine or two, 10-round BX-1 magazines. For increased long-range elevation capabilities, the rifle is topped with a 30 MOA Picatinny scope base.

For more information on the Ruger Precision Rimfire or to learn more about the extensive line of award-winning Ruger firearms, visit Ruger.com or Facebook.com/Ruger. To find accessories for the Ruger Precision Rimfire and other Ruger firearms, visit ShopRuger.com or your local independent retailer of Ruger firearms.

Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. (NYSE-RGR) is proud to introduce the Ruger Precision™ Rimfire rifle. Bringing the big-gun experience to the rimfire world, the Ruger Precision Rimfire is a scaled down version of the Ruger Precision Rifle® and maintains the same ergonomics, trigger and manual of arms as the larger centerfire rifle. The Ruger Precision Rimfire is the ideal long-range shooting trainer and go-to rifle for your next rimfire match. The Ruger Precision Rimfire features a molded, one-piece chassis and adjustable buttstock assembly manufactured from glass-filled nylon for strength, stiffness and stability, offering a solid foundation for accuracy each and every shot. The innovative Quick-Fit adjustable Precision Rimfire stock allows the rifle's length of pull and comb height to be quickly and easily adjusted for proper fit over a wide range of shooter sizes, outerwear and shooting positions. Indicating marks molded into the chassis help you quickly return to a previous position. To make the .22 LR chambering feel more like 6.5 Creedmoor, Ruger engineers designed the Big-Gun adjustable bolt throw technology. By simply removing a spring clip, shooters can change from a rimfire 1-1/2" bolt throw to a short-action centerfire 3" bolt throw, reducing the chance of short-stroking the bolt in competition. Identical to the Ruger Precision Rifle, the oversized bolt handle makes for positive bolt manipulation. The rifle's 18" target barrel is cold hammer-forged from 4140 alloy steel to create ultra-precise rifling for excellent accuracy. The 1/2"-28 thread pattern allows for easy pairing with the Silent-SR® suppressor or other muzzle devices. The 15" hard black anodized aluminum, free-float handguard features Magpul® M-LOK® slots on all four sides for improved scope clearance and easy mounting of M-LOK-compatible rails and accessories. The popular Ruger Marksman Adjustable™ trigger has a pull weight range of 2.25 to 5.0 pounds; the adjusting wrench is conveniently stored in a buttstock compartment on the rifle. Ruger's own AR-pattern pistol grip and safety selector allow for maximum control and access to the 45 degree, reversible safety selector. The Precision Rimfire ships with one, 15-round BX-15® magazine or two, 10-round BX-1 magazines. For increased long-range elevation capabilities, the rifle is topped with a 30 MOA Picatinny scope base. For more information on the Ruger Precision Rimfire or to learn more about the extensive line of award-winning Ruger firearms, visit Ruger.com or Facebook.com/Ruger. To find accessories for the Ruger Precision Rimfire and other Ruger firearms, visit ShopRuger.com or your local independent retailer of Ruger firearms.

comments

  1. avatar Bfitts says:

    Shut up and take my money!!!

    1. wish it was legal in ny

      1. avatar Bfitts says:

        A .22lr bolt action isn’t legal?

        1. avatar Snatchums says:

          Threaded barrel?

        2. avatar ATFAgentBob says:

          Magazine capacity, buttstock, threaded barrel, and pistol grip all make it illegal not the caliber…. Gotta love that SAFE act goodness.

        3. avatar Anon in Ct says:

          Dude – it’s a BOLT GUN – all those awful AW rules don’t apply. They’ll need a NY/CT package with just a 10 round mag, but otherwise it should be 50 state compliant.

          Happily, my pre-2013 standard capacity mags will work!

        4. avatar Davis Thompson says:

          It’s totally legal. Prohibitions only apply to semi-autos.

      2. avatar raptor jesus says:

        It is legal in NYS.

        None of the “evil feature” restrictions apply if it is not a SEMI AUTOMATIC WITH A DETACHABLE MAGAZINE.

        This is how we get full bore ARs in NY (albeit with only 10 rounds) – pin the mag and use the Mean Arms or Bear quick loader through the ejection port. Viola.

      3. avatar Anonymous says:

        There is a 10-round version and the features test doesn’t apply to bolt guns for NY…

        1. your right , bolt actions are ok for now , but it does look scary , and that is the problem with ny

        2. avatar raptor jesus says:

          Looking scary isn’t a problem with every part of the state except the NY Metro area. None of the police upstate enforce the SAFE act. I have been to the range repeatedly with people toting 30 round mags, pistol grips, etc

        3. avatar Hannibal says:

          You’re the only who didn’t bother to actually do more than immediately assume the gun was illegal because it ‘looked scary’ though so…

      4. avatar RandallOfLegend says:

        it is legal in NY. Because it’s a bolt action you can have all the gizmos. If it was semi-auto it would be banned.

  2. avatar mike oregon says:

    Right handed only? Now I’m a persecuted minority, Down with Righty!!

    1. avatar Ragnar says:

      I’m with you Mike. Ruger, along with many other companies, are losing out on a lot of money by ignoring 10% of the population.

      All we ask is; if you make a bolt-action rifle, than please make a left-handed version.

    2. avatar JoeVK says:

      I’m a lefty who shoots righty. I have no idea why, I’m just weird like that. I do a few things left handed, a few things right, and a few things with either hand. Writing is firmly in the left-only category, while shooting is in the right-only, although I’m hoping to get it in the “either hand” category.

    3. avatar Don from CT says:

      I keep waiting for a full sized LH Ruger Precision Rifle.

      Still waiting

    4. avatar VerendusAudeo says:

      I’m rather disappointed with Ruger not making a LH friendly precision rifle. They would corner the market overnight.

  3. avatar pewpewpew says:

    If it’s considerably more accurate than ruger’s other bolt action rimfires, and at a reasonable price, i might just buy one of these. Not holding my breath on the accuracy though.

  4. avatar David says:

    MSRP $529!

    1. avatar sean says:

      So that means $350 or so in the real world.

      Yes, I am interested in this.

  5. avatar Indy Jones says:

    while this is cool and all, what’s the effective range of 22lr? i always thought it was 50ft or so. is a precision rifle really necessary at such a range?

    1. avatar JeffR says:

      Most benchrest competitions are done at 50 yards but some guys do 100 yard and even 200 yard competitions. With standard velocity rounds, they start to drop quite a bit after about 75 yards, and you need a 20 MOA rail to shoot much beyond 100 yards.

    2. avatar strych9 says:

      It’s generally considered to have a max effective range of ~150 yards with real world effectiveness at ~80-100 yards.

    3. avatar TomD says:

      I can pretty reliably hit clays @ 235 yards with my FV-SR and CCI SV. It will teach you to read the wind well, suppressed is great for trigger control/flinch control since it is so quiet, not to mention it is cheap as hell to shoot. Headshots on woodchucks work well at least out to 180 yards or so. They’re honestly a ton of fun.

    4. avatar Jim says:

      We have a 22LR precision match in the area (greater Triangle/Triad NC area) that goes out to 300 yards. I run a 22 match out to 150 yards, and I think there are a couple more in the state at similar distances. You can learn most of what you need to shoot centerfire at 1000 yards with 22LR at 250-300 yards.

      1. avatar Mark N. says:

        Having shot a steel target at 200 yards just eyeballing the hold over, which I think was about 2-3′, the hold over at 300 must be massive.

        1. avatar Jim says:

          Yep. Hence the 30MOA rail.

      2. avatar Howard Casey Key says:

        Where in north carolina is a 22lr shoot Jim I would love to know

    5. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

      There are competitions at 200 yards for .22 LR’s.

      I’ve shot a couple of such matches with my Winchester 52B, with globe/aperture sights. It’s a lot of fun – 1000 yard centerfire challenges at closer ranges and lower cost.

  6. avatar ATFAgentBob says:

    Magazine capacity, buttstock, and pistol grip all make it illegal not the caliber…. Gotta love that SAFE act goodness.

  7. avatar Old Guy in Montana says:

    30 MOA on a .22lr rifle…what next…mounting a Vortex PST Gen II 5×25 FFP scope for prairie dogs that are really waaay out there??

    1. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

      Heck yeah! Plugging away in dog towns is a whole lotta fun.

      Aside, I’d love to see them offer this in .22 Mag!

      1. avatar Old Guy in Montana says:

        Meh, if it works for you then go for it. That is what I use the .17 HMR and .204 Ruger for. In my experience, the .22lr works well up close and personal for prairie dogs and ground squirrels…not at ranges where I would need an additional 30 MOA built into the rifle. If you get one let us know how it shoots…I ‘bin wrong before.

  8. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

    A detachable magazine?

    I don’t think Anschuetz or Walther have anything to worry about here…

    1. avatar Matt P says:

      Why is a detachable mag an issue?

      1. avatar Em says:

        Well you see, if you gave the Ruger a fixed magazine, it would suddenly compete directly against $1000-4000 target rifles from Germany. But since it uses detachable magazines, it competes directly with other ~$500 bolt-action rimfires…Or something like that. I don’t get it either.

      2. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

        Detachable magazines negatively affect accuracy – believe it or not. The same is true in centerfire rifles.

        Further, there is little provision for globe/aperture sights on this rifle. The shroud over the barrel isn’t the place to mount sights – you want to mount them on a receiver or barrel.

        Ruger’s idea of “precision” in this rimfire rifle is sort of a Princess Bride thing – “You keep using that word – I don’t think it means what you think it means…”

        1. avatar Em says:

          I honestly don’t see how a detachable magazine would negatively affect accuracy vs a fixed magazine. Seems to me that a closed bolt is a closed bolt and the bullet is long out of the barrel by the time that the “fixedness” of the magazine has an effect on the rifle. (obviously speaking of accuracy. I have no doubt that box magazines add another variable to the overall reliability of the platform.)

          And, all that said:

          What products do Anschutz and Walther make that even come close to competing with this gun?

        2. avatar Edward Franklin says:

          I assume that’s why the vast majority of precision rifles these days have detachable magazines then? To actively hinder their own accuracy for no reason? This thing isn’t targeting Anschutz rifles because that’s a tiny market to chase, Ruger probably sells more rimfire rifles in a month than Anschutz sells in a year or more.
          Personally I’ll likely buy one simply because it’s a neat analogue to the larger RPR.

        3. avatar Lance F says:

          Is it possible to get globe/aperture sights for my Win. 67?

        4. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

          Just because some marketing dweeb in an office calls it a “precision rifle” doesn’t make it a ‘precise’ rifle.

          If detachable magazines had even no net effect on accuracy, you’d see the benchrest folks using them, as there are times they’d like to get a string of fire downrange between gusts of wind, as quickly as possible. There’s a reason why you see some benchrest rifles with “load left, eject right” porting on them – so they can single-load and shovel the rounds through as quickly as possible.

          Once more, I have to admonish TTAG readers to get their heads out of their tacti-kewl sand, and look at what the “old fat white guys” have been doing for decades in precision/accuracy. Want to know what the record for single-loading benchrest rifles has been?

          About 0.009″, set back in 1973.

          It was recently broken by a shooter in Texas who threw down a group of 0.0077″ – both of these were at 100 yards.

          In order to compete effectively in benchrest shooting, your rifle better be capable of throwing down an honest, 5-shot 1/4″ group. Most magazine fed rifles, regardless of whether they’re semi-auto or bolt action, won’t do that. 1/2″ – maybe. 1/4″ Not reliably.

          Part of the issue is that in order to get groups this small, you start to worry about the neck tension on your cases, and you want the neck tension to be very uniform (along with everything else about your load). You want the bullet to be launched into the chamber throat as perfectly aligned as possible. This means your bullets will be a bit looser in the case than factory loaded ammo, and you want to gently load them into the chamber straight-in.

          Feeding out of some magazines is going to use the bullet to guide the round into the chamber, possibly pushing the bullet ever so slightly off-center. It might not seem like much, but there’s a reason why so many shooters turn the necks of their cases, and have their chambers cut to have “tight necks” so that they can get the bullet perfectly centered on the bore axis when they launch it. When you start trying to close up your groups under 1/2″, you start having to do these things – because the easy improvements to close up your group size have been done.

        5. avatar Dyspeptic Gunsmith says:

          re: Winchester 67 and globe/peep sights.

          I don’t think it would be worth the money to put a globe/aperture sight setup on a 67. On a 52 or 75, yes, on the 67… no.

          But you could put on a peep sight, and there was one made for the 67/68/69, and I’ve seen it on one Model 67. This is a link to an expired sale of one such sight on eBay; I’m using this link because it has some of the nicer pics I can find:

          https://www.ebay.com/itm/Winchester-No-96-B-67-68-69-Vintage-Complete-Rear-Wheel-Peep-Sight-/253307218129?rmvSB=true&nma=true&si=FHFUqyj111o1hstcmsO4CB0kZTo%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

          A set of globe/aperture sights can cost $350 and up. A simple peep & front post setup is far less expensive…

        6. avatar Herpus D. Derpus says:

          Legitimately you seem to be hung up on the name of the rifle and don’t seem to grasp the entire market it’s built for. Did you do the same for the RPR because it’s not a 45lb rail gun you bolt to a table?
          This rifle is a miniature version of the RPR so people who have one can have a trainer of sorts, or so folks can buy a somewhat more accurate Ruger American Rimfire that mimics the larger and more expensive RPR. Sure, benchrest rifles do this and they do that in their quest for accuracy and that is well and good, but you’d be fooling yourself if you think Ruger is going to spend the time making a 12lb version of the Precision Rimfire with a single shot receiver and globe sights so a vanishingly small market of people can buy it, different markets and different rifles, and Ruger knows which one will make more money.

          So while you talk about TTAG readers needing to pull their heads out of their sand prehaps you should do the same because you can’t seem to figure out this isn’t a bench queen that is generally about as useful as a football bat. If it bugs you so much that Ruger doesn’t rigidly follow your naming conventions then prehaps you could send a letter to Ruger to implore them to change the Precision Rimfire and RPR to the Ruger Somewhat More Accurate But Not Benchrest Accurate Rifle, or RSMABNBAR.

        7. avatar Herpus D. Derpus says:

          The world record rifle that made the 0.0077 group for those wondering. Certainly a rifle that would be a real wonder for anything outside of living on a bench. Can’t see why Ruger didn’t build this instead, sure it would sell tens of units.
          http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2013/08/inside-look-at-world-record-0077-group-the-gun-and-ammo/

    2. avatar RICHARD KENDALL says:

      Well, my Ruger Precision Rimfire shot .145 groups yesterday. Far better than the best my Anschutz ever did. Sold my Anschutz.

  9. avatar Wiregrass says:

    I dunno. My rimfire matches are 3 position shoots, not benchrest. Just doesn’t look as practical for that as a good ‘ol 10/22 with the right barrel, trigger and stock.

    1. avatar RICHARD KENDALL says:

      My 10/22 Compact, bone stock except for the upgraded Ruger trigger group, shoot..21 inch groups at 50 yards with Lapua Center X. They are fine rifles, and probably better for non bench competition than the Precision Rimfire. But…I do love the accuracy from my new Precision Rimfire. It is a well made piece of machinery.

  10. avatar tiger says:

    Sigh………. More tacticool hardware?

  11. avatar Matt o says:

    I have a pws summit t3 build that I love, I feel like this would make a great friend for it.

  12. avatar Saul R says:

    This thing has to shoot. If it can’t shoot with the better CZ’s and Savages, there’s no point. But if it shoots, the chassis helps. The adjustable comb and LOP are good features. You can put a 30 MOA mount or replacement stocks on other rimfires but it helps that it’s part of the package here for a MSRP not much higher than the better CZ’s and Savages.

  13. avatar Huntmaster says:

    It comes down to one thing. Is it real, or is it a pretender? I would like to think that Ruger was serious.

  14. avatar Greg says:

    The owner’s manual for the RPR is already up on Ruger’s website. I was thinking about building a 10/22 with a chassis, but this at less than $500 would be cheaper than cobbing together the components.

    For the 10/22: $200 for 10/22; $250 for 10/22 chassis, grip, buttstock, forend; $30 for MOA rail, and $70 for trigger work would make the 10/22 project a $550 rifle (without a barrel upgrade) , where this RPR would come in around $400-$450 with a barrel already threaded for a suppressor and a trigger to adjust to 2.5lbs.

    This seems to have a better barrel lock-up system, and with the handguard is free floated. I think I’ve made my decision.

    1. avatar JohnB says:

      Already on sale for pre-order – 375 at Tombstone and 399 at Sportsman Outdoors

      1. avatar RICHARD KENDALL says:

        I saw the same thing. Went into Tombstone, and they had no idea where that came from. They had none available for sale or pre-order. Got mine from Lone Wolf for $399. Took 3 days to get it.

  15. avatar Howard Casey Key says:

    Whatabout iron sights for high school kids that shoot compat it in peep sights type of sights

  16. avatar racer88 says:

    I will definitely get one as a cheap / fun analog to my brand new (Christmas) RPR in 6.5 Creedmoor.

    Just like the M&P 15-22 analog to a full-size AR-15. Love my 15-22! I bet I’ll love the RPR-22, too.

  17. avatar Adam says:

    So is this the new “Liberty Training Rifle”?

  18. avatar RICHARD KENDALL says:

    Picked up mine today. No chance to shoot it yet, but it is a very well made piece of machinery

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