Bump Fire Ban Bill Bye-Bye Leaves Gun Rights Advocates Rooting for the ATF Over the NRA

NRA Veep Wayne LaPierre calls for additional regulation of bump fire stocks (courtesy youtube.com)

It looks like the NRA is winning the battle against the bump fire ban bill. We hear House Speaker Paul Ryan won’t be bringing it to the floor for a vote. That’s the good news. The bad news . . .

The NRA and its legislative supporters continue to insist that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives should add the plastic firearms part to items regulated by the National Firearms Act — despite the fact that the ATF [rightfully] ruled that bump fire stocks are not machine guns. Or a device that turns a rifle into a machine gun.

As I’ve argued numerous times, green-lighting the ATF to regulate bump fire stocks off the market is a stupendously bad idea.

As my Rhode Island cronies would say, the ATF is not a friend of ours. Or of the United States Constitution. Or of the Second Amendment.  Or of Americans who believe that federal agents should obey the law.

ATF agents in Waco, Texas (courtesy spin.com)

This they’ve proven at Waco and Ruby Ridge. By supplying Mexican drug thugs with weapons during their Fast and Furious anti-gun smuggling gun smuggling black bag job. By creating a multi-million-dollar secret slush fund. By exploiting a mentally damaged teenager in Wisconsin. By setting up “stings” that inspired gun thefts by paying sky-high prices for stolen guns. Etc.

Giving the ATF power to interpret law according to prevailing political whims — rather than insisting they follow the law as writ — is like giving a first grader a cup of Nitro Cold Brew and expecting them to sit quietly through mass class. Once unleashed, the ATF will use their power to regulate firearms, firearms parts, ammunition and gun sales as they see fit.

In short, the NRA’s “answer” to the public outcry to rid the country of a piece of plastic used in a single if [horribly] spectacular crime put gun rights on a slippery slope to California-style oblivion. Provided that is, the ATF plays ball.

Our sources inside the Bureau say the agency mucky-mucks are dead set against reversing its ruling on bump fire stocks. I think they’re dreaming, drunk on their own power, underestimating the pressure they’re going to face from both parties, the President and the media.

But I hope the ATF does stick to their proverbial guns. Which puts me — and anyone who cherishes their natural, civil and Constitutionally protected right to keep and bear arms — in the uncomfortable position of supporting the ATF naysayers against the NRA.

And one more thing. If the ATF balks at the NRA’s “answer” to the bump fire stock furore, the “problem” will not go away. Republicans running to reelection need to take bump fire stocks off the table before they go to voters, who support a bump fire ban. So the President will set a dangerous precedent by issuing some kind of Executive Order outlawing them, or Congress will return to a legislative solution.

As Simon and Garfunkel wrote back in the day, anyway you look at this we lose. Thanks to a spree killer named Stephen Paddock. And the NRA? You tell me.

comments

  1. avatar Leighton Cavendish says:

    “ATF should be the name of a convenience store”…saw that one time and loved it…even though I do not smoke…
    Let people buy what they want…but make them take personal responsibility and do serious jail time if they abuse their rights….

    1. avatar Andrew Lias says:

      I throw a quart or two of it in my car now and again, it leaks it out.

      1. avatar Haškɛnadɨltla says:

        Call me a conspiracy nut if it makes you feel better but why has Harry Reid and his cabal been so quiet all through this tragedy??

        1. avatar Geoff PR says:

          What can they do? They have no Aces to play, no magic tricks at all.

          Oh, and ‘Dingy Harry’ Reid *did* call for UBCs shortly after, even tho the nutjob passed ’em…

    2. avatar TXGunGal says:

      I don’t support banning Bum Fire or anything else that makes killing feral hogs safer and more efficient here on Texas farms and ranches.
      Murder, whose criminal behavior created this despicable mayhem was a “rabid” left wing nut case. I do believe his purpose was to kill 2nd Ammendment. So from the fires of hell, nothing would make me as happy as him learning he failed!

      1. avatar Leroy Jenkins says:

        You don’t have to make crap up, there’s no conspiracy in Vegas to push XXXX value, just a miserable, evil, douchebag punishing happy people, for not being miserable too. No more, no less.

        There’s no vast right, er, left wing conspiracy.

        1. avatar Mercury says:

          There absolutely is a conspiracy to cover up what exactly went down in Vegas. If you don’t recognize that then you haven’t seen or read a single firsthand recording or account, or even read the analyses of any alternative commentators. The only people ignoring all the inconsistencies with the official account and the FBI activities that scream “coverup” are the major news outlets and the people who only get their information from them.

          Look, the “everything is a conspiracy” crazies come out every time there’s a mass murder, but this time they’re right (about the fact that there is a conspiracy of some sort, not the exact details. Some of their hypotheses get pretty outlandish.) What the FBI says happened in Vegas just doesn’t add up and they’ve been destroying evidence because they know it.

    3. avatar Garrison Hall says:

      The ATF has already ruled that there’s no legal justification for prohibiting bunp-stocks. Any new “ruling” will almost certainly wind up in court for just this reason. At best the NRA’s position is a distraction, a shiny object that draws the we-gotta-do-something-right-now gun control hysteria away from passing new gun-control legislation. Gun Controllers would love to make changing triggers on an AR15 a felony offense. That, too, would certainly be challenged in court but it’s a lot harder to challenge a law than a bureaucratic ruling.

  2. avatar Noishkel says:

    If nothing else the anti’s can’t hold onto their moral outrage for so long.

    That said, expect state level attempts to have them banned. The tide has been turned it seems, but don’t expect this fight to be over.

    1. avatar Mark N. says:

      They’ve been banned for years in California. I’m not sure, but I think binary triggers are as well.

      1. avatar kevin says:

        yes binary triggers are banned here in CA also.

        1. avatar kevin says:

          PENAL CODE
          SECTION 32900-32990

          32900. Except as provided in Chapter 1 (commencing with Section
          17700) of Division 2 of Title 2, any person in this state who manufactures or causes to be manufactured, imports into the state,keeps for sale, or offers or exposes for sale, or who gives, lends,or possesses any multiburst trigger activator is punishable by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year or imprisonment pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170.

          16930. As used in this part, a “multiburst trigger activator” means either of the following:
          (a) A device designed or redesigned to be attached to a semiautomatic firearm, which allows the firearm to discharge two or
          more shots in a burst by activating the device.
          (b) A manual or power-driven trigger activating device constructed and designed so that when attached to a semiautomatic firearm it increases the rate of fire of that firearm.

    2. avatar The Punisher says:

      As it should be. States should be able to do things and not have the fedgov interfere. This is true “federalism”. But that’s not what anybody wants. States disagree on gay marriage, welp, better get big bro fedgov in there to sort it out for everybody. States disagree on abortion, better call fedgov. Marijuana? Fedgov can solve that! Hey, we oughta force every state to recognize every other state’s concealed carry permit!!! Better call in the fedgov boys to force that edict.

      Now, all of that said, it is extremely foolish and ridiculous that in the 21st century we are still having to deal with tyrannies such as this. Why do we continue to believe that governments can and should solve anything? Where is the proof that they’ve ever done anything – ANYTHING – to make things better? Why do we allow them to decide what is contraband?

      And this – in spite of thousands of years of evidence of millions dead at the hands of various regimes, countless lives and resources wasted over pointless wars, untold numbers of wealth stolen and redistributed.

      And yet we ask for this!?!? We are truly insane!

      One can be guilty of an act of Commission and one can also be guilty of acts of Omission. Failure to do something that one knows is right and just or failure to do something that lets something evil and heinous to occur.

      Citizens of a nation or state that let departments such as the ATF, FBI, CIA, Congress, Executive, Supreme Court, etc. continue to be funded and exist – that is national guilt for willful acts of omission. We only have ourselves to blame because we will neither do what is necessary to outright stop this insanity nor will we refuse to obey and instead choose to peacefully withdraw from it.

      We have the government we deserve.

      1. avatar pwrserge says:

        No, that’s retarded. Federalism is not a reason to let states ignore the CotUS. The CotUS sets the ground rules. For example, the 5th amendment becomes meaningless if state police are allowed to ignore it and beat a confession out of you.

        1. avatar TactiCool says:

          Well said!

        2. avatar TyrannyOfEvilMen says:

          Congratulations! You win the Internet.

          Of course, even as untrusting as the founders were of government, they never would’ve thought in a million years that residents of any given state would let their own state governments treat them as slaves.

          Then again, none of them ever met a 21st century Californian! 😉

      2. avatar LarryinTX says:

        Let me ask you a question, here. Why wasn’t the RTKBA simply included in the 1st amendment? The answer is that the standards were different. 1A dictates that “*Congress* shall make no law …”, clearly restricting the fed.gov from interfering with those rights while allowing interference by states, counties, cities, whatever. 2A’s restriction is “shall not be infringed”, ie by ANYBODY, state, county, city, freaking anybody! If you passed 10th grade English, that should be immediately obvious. Yet, all “interpretations” for about 200 years are directly opposite that really clear reading! Utah is free to declare Mormon the state religion and to allow multiple wives to anyone. But CA is NOT free to outlaw machine guns. Nor is Bumfuck, SD. If you can READ, you can see the advance of tyranny. SCOTUS can “interpret” all they want, but their perfidy is pretty clear.

        1. avatar B-Rad says:

          Well, that’s…not smart.

          Under that logic, why is there a 3rd amendment, 12th amendment. They’re enumerated as different ideas, because that’s how the Articles of Confederation were defined, and the Magna Carta, the daddy document to the Constitution.

        2. avatar barnbwt says:

          Oh yeah, B-rad, despite countless revisions and debate ahead of both drafting & ratification, there is absolutely no meaning behind the absence of any mention of Congress (explicitly the law-making arm of the federal government) in the second amendment, nor is there any reason it is starkly more broad and clear in its language than the other amendments. The right of the people to regulate their militias shall not be infringed.

          Now, one could argue that it’s because those guys knew that fedgov arms besides Congress could infringe plenty (and had), but they didn’t refer to the States or Fedgov as far as the limitations portion of the sentence (just reference that the States were to be the foremost beneficiary of this unrestricted right of the people)

  3. avatar Vitsaus says:

    Waiting for the NRA Kool-Aid drinkers to come in and explain how this is actually pure genius and not capitulation that opens the door to a frightening amount of new restrictions

    1. avatar HRFDEZ14185 says:

      I agree with you. I am an NRA member, but this is bullshtein in a chef salad. If the NRA continues with this attitude, I won’t be getting my membership renewed.

    2. avatar Haškɛnadɨltla says:

      👍👍👍

    3. avatar Ing says:

      This is actually pure genius!

      Well, I don’t know about that…it could be genius or pure crap or something in between. We’ll see how it plays out in the time ahead.

      As much as I hope the NRA is pursuing some secretly brilliant strategy we can’t yet fathom, I don’t have much faith that it’ll turn out well. This whole thing stinks.

      1. avatar MarkPA says:

        So, we all think that a war/battle/scrimmage is something that can be choreographed like a ballet. That’s a pretty foolish notion.

        My conjecture is that the NRA’s management thought this move was tactical and politic; get the issue off the floor of Congress and into the smoke-filled laboratories of the ATF.

        ATF would – they anticipated – likely announce, after a very long deliberation, that they were correct in concluding that a bump-fire stock was not a regulate-able artifact. And, moreover, that it won’t be easy to draft sensible regulation that will prohibit “bad” accessories without infringing on “good” accessories. Congress is free to try; but, ATF warns how difficult this will prove to be.

        Meanwhile, lots of other issues will have come and gone. Who knows, there might be a sex scandal in Hollywood that captures the nation’s attention! Stranger things have happened.

        Did NRA’s management seem conciliatory? Yes, it did. But, it’s NRA’s Board of Directors that defines NRA policy; and, LaP/Cox might be in line for a public reprimand. In any case, NRA’s lobbyists can always tell their favorite Congress-critter that they tried to find a compromise, but the members [voters] wouldn’t stand for it. Ultimately, as a membership organization, the NRA must bow to the wishes of its members [voters].

        So, this bump-stock concession might be the first slip down the slope that the Anti’s may point to; and we respond, “Ya, but it didn’t happen”. I.e., there was no concession that made it into law; no precedent set.

        In 18 months we will have elected a new Congress; perhaps we will see a new justice on SCOTUS. There may be new litigation that cites DC v. Wrenn. And, maybe there will be few in the media that will be able to explain what a bump-stock is.

    4. avatar Hank says:

      I’m not an NRA member because I hate their willingness to compromise. That said, when these stocks came out I thought to myself “what could possibly go wrong?” It was a problem waiting to happen. Now, if some restrictions are bound to happen I think a narrow ruling by the ATF (spit) would be better than some vague nebulously worded act of congress that will be open to endless reinterpretation by future Democrat administrations. Because that’s what they do, use language that opens the door to broader and broader definitions. Besides, idiot congressmen are the last folks I’d trust to define what’s what when it comes to guns.

      1. avatar Robert Farago says:

        What “narrow ruling” might that be? Seriously, how do you thread that needle when bump fire stocks don’t turn an AR into a machine gun?

  4. avatar Defens says:

    Here’s one possible scenario:
    Bump fire bill comes off the table.
    NRA points finger at ATF, saying – They are the evil bastards that should have outlawed this bastard child of a machine gun when it was first conceived!!
    ATF reviews previous decision – stand firm that they have no authority to ban it.
    Public outcry ensues.
    Pro-Gunners join with Anti-Gunners to declare – What a useless agency! We must do something!
    “National Conversation” is held – anti- and pro- gunners decide that the ATF, being useless, should be done away with.
    No suitable substitute agency is found – NFA has no one to enforce it, so it is repealed as well.
    Much rejoicing occurs among the gun culture. Sad pandas on the other side.

    1. avatar Jon in CO says:

      You’re a great fiction writer. Have any other works?

      /sarc

      If your scenario plays out, to the t, or close to it, I’m coming to you for lottery numbers.

    2. avatar kevin says:

      you lost me at “National Conversation”. There are no conversations in this country anymore.

  5. avatar Joe R. says:

    The push back should be 500%. Slide Fire Manufacturing should sue for wrongful interference.

  6. avatar Joe R. says:

    At least the whole situation has really polarized the parties. The NRA outed itself as being against gun owners. Republicants proved they are worse than just not giving a crap.

    It needed to happen.

    1. avatar TexTed says:

      Sometimes I am amazed at the breathtaking stupidity on display by the so-called 2A supporters.

      Just have a little perspective: 20 years ago, concealed carry didn’t exist. Today, it is legal in all 50 states.

      Campus Carry, the bane of all liberals, is legal in more states than ever.

      Open carry is legal in more states than ever.

      We’re actually discussing, and there’s even a bill pending, to remove silencers from the NFA, for crying out loud! That wasn’t even imagined or dreamed of 10 years ago.

      Hillary promised Australia-style gun confiscation, universal background checks, and called half the country “deplorables”. Hillary is not president today. Why? The NRA. The NRA went all-in on Trump before almost anybody. They put all their weight, and all their capital, into defeating Hillary and getting Trump elected. Why? Gun rights, first and foremost.

      There’s a world of difference between saying “I don’t agree with the NRA’s position on the ATF” and “The NRA outed itself against gun owners.”

      Freedom is finally breaking out, all over the place. The landscape is a hundred thousand times more favorable for gun owners today, than it was 20 years ago. Hell, 20-ish years ago America’s favorite rifle was BANNED, for cryin’ out loud. Now you can buy ’em for $400 at wal-mart.

      No, the NRA is not perfect. No, they don’t score a home run at every single at-bat. No, they don’t score a touchdown on first down every time they touch the ball. But dammit, they’re mopping the floor with the antis. And this “anti-NRA” bent some people on this site are parroting is sickening.

      1. avatar hrfdez says:

        Well Teddy, it takes stupid to recognize stupid, so carry on dweeb! If you don’t respect opinions, then you are a hypocrite Teddy!

      2. avatar Nanashi says:

        LaPierre Laval officially stated the NRA’s support for continuing the NFA and Hughes Amendment (the second LaPierre himself claimed its end as the the NRA’s top priority. Which is it?).

        I’m not a battered spouse. The NRA is not my friend and it never has been.

      3. avatar HP says:

        Nice to see that someone else actually gets it. The NRA has been invaluable.

  7. avatar GunzGunzGunz says:

    If Jesus really loves us, he would open the machine gun registry. But that’s not going to happen. So Jesus doesn’t love us.

    1. avatar Andrew Lias says:

      Agreed, I would think that even if they weren’t banned bumpfire stock makers would largely go out of business if it weren’t for the Hughes Amendment.

      1. avatar LarryinTX says:

        Of course. Buying a select fire AR would be like $30 more than a semi, a bumpfire stock adds some $450, why would you go that route?

  8. avatar Andrew Lias says:

    “Lets give the ATF more regulatory power that is not really accountable to anyone.” Said no 2A lover EVER. This is the pinnacle of bad ideas.

  9. avatar st381183 says:

    Hear Paul Ryan won’t bring HR3999 to the floor from whom? Prob won’t bring it to the floor only because it was poorly written. I’m sure a much better written bill is being drafted right now. I want to hear from Mr Ryan that no anti 2A legislation will be introduced by Republicans in a public setting, not a wink wink nudge nudge setting.

  10. avatar Ton E says:

    Robert you should know that James Yeager says we should back the NRA leadership and the joint statement Wayne LaPierre and Chris Cox put out. Without the NRA we wouldn’t have our rights!!!!!

    1. avatar TactiCool says:

      Once you mentioned that idiot James Yeager, you lost the argument.

      And yes, without the NRA we will still have the Constitution. I am an NRA member, but come on, I am also a free thinker, not a Kool Aid drinker.

      1. avatar Ton E says:

        Nah uh! You must be a hillary voter!!

  11. avatar fiundagner says:

    let’s look at this from a slightly different perspective. I don’t think this is the game they are playing or even a variant of the game But let’s consider it. Assume the ATF does get the green light to reclassify bump fire stocks as machine guns. Having determined that they are not machine guns and several years ago does that give us standing in a court of law when all of a sudden bump fire stocks become machineguns and unregistered onEs at that? That means that those are machine guns that are in civilian hands and were manufactured after 1986. So couldn’t that be taken through the court system and eventually up to the Supreme Court to possibly deregulate machine guns and overturned the Hughes Amendment and possibly even the NFA. what could it possibly green like the manufacturer of machine guns as long as it is done privately? or and this is a complete long shift does it not possibly give us a lever to take the ATF apart entirely if all of a sudden they can regulate something into a felony

  12. avatar dwb says:

    ATF wont touch bump fires with a McMillan TAC-50 from 2 miles. If they rescind their opinion, what the heck are they going to do with literally thousands of unregistered machine guns? Please turn them in? Please register them? If they open the registry to non-LEO for new machine guns, then what about all those other new machine guns made since, ahem, 1986?

    Haha, good luck with that.

    The NRA knows this. By coming out “for” regulation of bump fires but against specific bills because they are overly broad, they hit the sweet spot. By the time the ATF gets around to reviewing it, we hold congressional hearings, and more bills are written for the NRA to reject as overly broad, cooler heads will have prevailed and we will be well into election year. Nothing gets done in an election year. NRA knows this as well. Or maybe we get a deal – national reciprocity and deregulation of silencers and SBRs for a suitably limited registration of a piece of plastic along with all other new machine guns since 1986.

    The media push for this has already died. My “gun control” alerts from the NYT have dwindled from 3 per day down to 1 in the last week. A few months from now after Christmas we will be back to “whats a bump fire stock again?”

    This was a positively brilliant strategy.

    1. avatar Vitsaus says:

      Trouble is, the NRA has a well documented history of using our rights a bargaining chips, and selling out one type of gun owner to save another. This seems to fit that pattern quite well. Maybe you’ve never read American Rifleman issues from the 1960s where they had article condemning everything from foreign made inexpensive pistols, to military surplus rifles.

  13. avatar sound awake says:

    the nra has clearly demonstrated that it doesnt fully understand things like:

    what SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED means

    or…

    withholding comment until all the people are buried and some facts are known

    or…

    dont talk gun control when the president and the senate majority leader and the speaker of the house all have an r behind their name

    these are all not good things to not understand

  14. avatar Rimfire says:

    Are these bump fires serialized ? How about the dealer just runs these on 4473 form instead. No harm done for us but may placate the anti folks in Congress and those pesky Governor types tooJust throwing this out there to chew on, don’t crucify me.

    1. avatar Brian says:

      As serialized as barrel shrouds and pistol grips.

  15. avatar Rimfire says:

    Regarding old Wayne L. It’s time for him to ride off into the sunset. His day has come and gone. We need someone younger and more”relatable to today’s shooter. Dana Loesch comes to mind.

  16. avatar stateisevil says:

    Robert, I really question your political acumen, if you think that more than a minute fraction of people will decide to not vote Republican because said Republican did not vote for a bump stock ban. I can tell you unequivocally that will not happen, especially 13 months from now.

  17. avatar Jay in Florida says:

    For my 2 cents worth on this whole bump fire kerfuffle.
    Id like to believe the Feds will just let it go to the states and let them deal with it as they see fit. ATF wont change their minds Id like to believe. If they do try to make it a regulated tax stamp part. They will be in the courts for years.
    Nothing should be banned. But this little of any use item is going to be sacrificed one way or another. Eventually.
    Me they can make a criminal if they like. I don’t own a bump fire stock but do have belt loops, rubber bands and still have 10 fingers.

    1. avatar Brian says:

      I think that is what the ATF is worried about. If they reclassify them as machine gun parts, that means they’d have to open up the MG registry to allow those who own bump stocks/aftermarket triggers, etc. to register with the NFA. Imagine then, the people who would make true full auto setups to sell while the registry is open so people can register those parts.
      THAT would be a true nightmare for the gun grabbers.

      1. avatar Jay in Florida says:

        Make it a part of the 4435 form or whatever number that is?? Just a NICs check item.
        No matter what they the ATF or Congress does. I don’t want to see other modifications thrown under the bus. The bump stock and binary triggers as a $3-400 item would and should just disappear on their own if regulated.
        But not banned.
        Anything anyone does to ban any item. Will just make noncompliant criminals out of me and hundreds of thousand possibly millions of otherwise law abiding folks. Im not willing to give up any now legal property I own under any circumstances.

  18. avatar MLee says:

    You guys are overthinking it. Keep it simple!!! While the the shit-storm rains down, the NRA threw it in the ATFs lap. They were smart to not publicly defend something rather unknown, unpopular and for the most part, disposable. I mean, who really gives a rats ass about those things anyway? The shooting had the potential to be a catastrophic gun-rights tragedy for us gun nuts, where if we had president pant-suit in the ovarian office, we’d be in deep doo doo. California dried prune DiFi would be telling us to “turn em in”

    Let the smoke settle and lets hope that if they want to do something with bump-fire, we get something juicy in return.

    1. avatar Ton E says:

      How cute he believes it’s about just bump fire stocks. Prior to it being known a bump fire stock was used the anti gunners were calling for expanding background checks and gun control. It’s foolhardy to believe that it’s only about bump fire stocks or that the NRA is horse trading for progun legislation which they made no mention of.

      1. avatar MLee says:

        How cute. You’re still overthinking it.

  19. avatar former water walker says:

    And here I am in Illinois concerned my sh#t state will ban EVERYTHING semiautomatic. I’m not concerned one whit if machine guns are legal. Pardon me but DJT was elected in part because of the NRA. Yeah they should have repeated Newtown in strategy. We’ll see what goes down but I don’t forsee dropping the NRA for the little guys…

  20. avatar Rick Judd says:

    The. NRA are turn coats. Go GUN OWNERS OF AMERICA. and 2ND AMENDMENT FOUNDATION – NO COMPROMISE. Republican turn coats better watch what they are saying. It will come back to bite you in the ass come election day.

  21. avatar John in Ohio says:

    Just the NRA, RF. Unless it is proven that Paddock carried out a plan in order to increase infringement on the right to keep and bear arms, he isn’t to blame for what government and the NRA do. That is on them! Being a murderous scumbag would be on him. It’s no different than the left trying to blame gun owners or guns when a shooting happens. Let’s try to keep blame assigned where it belongs.

    If individuals who truly know the difference between privileges and rights look closely at how the NRA has conducted business and continues to do so, they will come to the same conclusion; the NRA is not really a friend of inalienable individual rights. It consistently advocates for privileges in the place of rights. The organization is comprised of usurpers, enslavers, fools, and unwitting accomplices. The NRA is not a turncoat organization. It has always favored privileges over rights.

    I hear a common argument that it is the most powerful political lobby we have. The problem is that they will never, ever, ever push all the way for the recognition of the un-infringed inalienable right of the individual to keep and bear arms. The stronger they become, the more likely we will only see privileges in place of the exercise of rights. Eventually, those of us who understand the real right to keep and bear arms will have to fight the NRA and their privileged stance. The very organization that people want to make stronger is our future enemy. SMH

    Great article, RF. Keep fighting the good fight.

  22. avatar Sian says:

    Easy check:

    Set up 500 targets 400 yards downrange. These are standard targets with vital zones marked.

    Shooter with a bumpstock has 10 minutes and 1000 rounds to hit as many as he can. He must fire long bursts.

    Repeat the test with a standard scoped semi-auto and a shooter of the same skill level.

    See how many are wounded/killed in each test.

    Bumpfire stocks do not make a rifle more deadly. They just make it louder.

  23. avatar kenneth says:

    “like giving a first grader a cup of Nitro Cold Brew and expecting them to sit quietly through mass class.”
    That one’s good, but this one’s better:
    “Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey and car keys to teenage boys.” -P. J. O’Rourke
    Well said, Mr. O’Rourke!

  24. avatar Calin Brabandt says:

    I resigned my membership in the rights-compromising NRA for good and will send the money to GOA. The NRA has a long proven and end game loss-assured strategy of compromise (since 1968)!

  25. avatar Mad Max says:

    “Republicans running to reelection need to take bump fire stocks off the table before they go to voters, who support a bump fire ban.”

    By election day, Republican/conservative voters won’t (support a ban).

  26. avatar ATFAgentBob says:

    Dude y’all know we ain’t about to reverse decision right? I mean seriously NO federal agency is gonna do something like that and look super incompetent and super stupid in front of God and everybody. We love our bloated budgets and slush funds too much to do something like that! Want proof? Look at the F35 and Osprey programs, they threw untold billions down those money pits just to try to make em work because they said they could and they already paid for em.

  27. avatar KP says:

    Federal law defines a machine gun as “any weapon which shoots, is designed to shoot, or can be readily restored to shoot, automatically more than one shot, without manual reloading, by a single function of the trigger.” This definition includes the frame or receiver, any part or combination of parts designed and intended, solely and exclusively, for use in converting a weapon into a machine gun, and any combination of parts from which a machine gun can be assembled (26 USC § 5845(b), 27 CFR §§ 478.11 & 479.11

    The point I’m trying to make is that machine guns are very strictly regulated (for obvious reason) by the government and you cannot convert semi-automatic weapons without incurring extreme consequences.

    What this latest lunatic did was demonstrate that you can legally purchase external components (bump stocks and 60-100 rd. magazines) to modify legally purchased weapons to effectively mimic a SAW which gave him the ability to continually hose a large target with sustained fire. He had enough knowledge to know that overheated barrels would be his weak link so he brought several similarly modified rifles that he could swap out to inflict as much carnage as possible in the shortest amount of time.

    What remains to be explained is how the form, fit & functionality of a bump stock got by the ATF for approval and how a combination of aftermarket parts could effectively nullify a law.

  28. avatar BierceAmbrose says:

    Why does legislation banning bump fire stocks not say “bump fire stocks” in it?

    It’s almost like they’re crafting the wording for the maximum possible power-grab off what they say they are trying to do. Naaaah.

    1. avatar Kenneth G Maiden says:

      To leave the door open for Pelosi, Schumer, Feinstein. They, or other TRAITOROUS rats will regain power at some point.

  29. avatar Thor 90 says:

    They should just repeal the Hughes Amendment already then no one will care if they’re classified as machine guns cuz they can still legally buy them they just need extra paperwork and it’s $200 extra and that will actually prevent crazy people from getting them cuz all the extra paperwork

  30. avatar Kenneth G Maiden says:

    To be honest, I don’t give a rats ass about that plastic gimmick bump shit stock. Don’t have one, don’t want one, don’t need one. However, If you do, that’s ok by me. Now, do I want to put trust into a government agency? OH hell NO. The abuse and lack of any meaningful oversight drives me to that opinion. Think Fast and Furious. Anyone in prison?

  31. avatar Ken Cates says:

    Here’s the deal…as most AR shooters already know, you can “bump-fire” any semi-black rifle or AK by sticking your finger through the trigger guard and hooking it through your belt loop. So a Slide-Fire piece of plastic isn’t the issue. Murderous NUTS and possibly some related Govt Cover-up of this mass shooters motivation is why this all happened. As a former ATF Special Agent I can tell you that ATF MANAGEMENT/Leadership needs oversight. The working agents are good Americans. ATF senior leadership does the bidding of DOJ heavies.

  32. avatar ozzallos says:

    Winning after nearly giving it away, you mean?

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