Liberte Austin’s Hunting Digest: Deer Season Marathon Edition

People need to be aware that walking in the woods during hunting season can be dangerous. And if you do, wear orange . . . Woman killed in hunting accident in Hebron

A 34-year-old woman was killed in a hunting accident Saturday morning in Hebron on the first day of deer hunting season.

She was pronounced dead at the scene, a heavily wooded area 200-300 yards off Greenwood Mountain Road in the Oxford County town, according to John MacDonald, spokesman for the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. The shooting happened around 10 a.m., he said.

Authorities have identified the shooter as a 38-year-old man who was part of a small hunting party that included at least one other person. He was being interviewed by the Maine Warden Service.

MacDonald said officials are still trying to determine exactly what the woman was doing in the area. Wardens say they don’t know whether she was hunting or in the woods for another reason, the Sun Journal reported.

Imagine walking in the woods and seeing dead deer everywhere. And we don’t mean the ones that you’ve shot . . . Disease kills hundreds of deer before hunting season starts

Deer in East Tennessee are being ravaged by a virus weeks before firearm hunting season opens.

The recent outbreak of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease, which is transmitted by small flies, is concerning hunters in Tennessee because of the damage it is doing to the white-tailed deer population.

“Usually we mow a lot of crops down there at night so the deer come out into the fields when they get used to the tractor. There weren’t any deer, so I just made the dreaded walk one day and just found them dead everywhere,” sportsman and farmer Ben Gamble told USA Today.

“I walked the creek one day and found about a dozen in a 300 yard walk, and that answered all my questions. That was all I needed to see,” he continued.

The disease, which is spread through biting midges and other tiny biting insects, is common for deer to get, says Mime Barnes, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency information and education officer. What isn’t common is the number of deer the virus has killed this year – the highest number since 2007.

 

Hunters aren’t only conservationists but can be crime scene investigators as well. I may just pack some sterile booties and plastic gloves in my hunting pack this year . . . Hunting for leads to missing persons during hunting season

Deer hunting season is a busy season for Georgia DNR game wardens like Jeff Billips.

“Lots of hunters. Lots of activity.” …

 

Sometimes they stumble upon the closure families and investigators have been searching for.

“Over the course of my career, we have had several occasions where hunters have made reports of finding remains that were missing persons or victims of crime, that is not uncommon.”

One example is New Year’s Eve, two young boys in Jenkins County found a 23-year-old who was reported missing in Statesboro nine months before.

I feel for this guy. I know the feeling of getting skunked one year then having a herd of 30 deer parked on my front yard the next. Venison is like crack and instead of antlers and bushy tails we see steak and jerky walking around . . . Illegal deer hunter ticketed: ‘I couldn’t help myself,’ he told DEC officers

“On the evening of Oct. 17, ECOs Steve Shaw and Ryan Kelley received a phone call from a concerned citizen in the town of Moreau stating that he had witnessed a man in a vehicle driving up and down a driveway and then heard a single gunshot.

Shortly thereafter, the caller saw lights in a wooded area. All of the activity occurred approximately one hour past legal hunting hours. When the ECOs arrived to investigate the complaint, they located an antlerless deer hanging in a tree near the front door of a nearby residence. A man at the residence was questioned by ECOs about the specifics of the deer taking.

He initially stated that he had shot the deer legally a few hours earlier behind his place of employment, but ultimately admitted to taking the deer on the property involved in the complaint. He stated that, “I didn’t even see a deer last season and the temptation was just too much for me. I couldn’t help myself even though I know what I did was wrong.”

Hunting is like playing the lottery, some people are just luckier than others . . .First-time hunter, 45, bags trophy buck with first shot

While most deer hunters devote years to bagging the buck of their dreams, Michael Zavala dropped a trophy with his first shot — that is, his first shot ever at a deer.

“I’ve wanted to hunt since I was a little boy, and this was my first opportunity,” said Zavala, 45, who moved to Eastern Washington recently from Southern California and bought property in the Nine Mile area.

“It’s the biggest mule deer buck I’ve ever seen come through our (Deer Park) check station in more than 20 years I’ve been around,” said Dana Base, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist based in Colville. “We’ve probably had mule deer bucks with wider racks, but not with that many points. It was an 8 by 7.”

This deer was just pissed off that joggers had blocked his path. And for that he lost his life! I hope they at least turned him into jerky . . . Aggressive Mule Deer Gores Two Men After Interrupting a Marathon

 

“Officer Wood received a report from a man who was participating in a marathon in the Porcupine Bay area over the weekend. The subject stated a mule deer buck entered the roadway where the people were running. The buck acted in an aggressive manner and began chasing some of the runners.

Two men who were manning a water station tried to chase the buck away but it turned and began attacking them. Both men were gored by the buck (one on the hand and the other on the leg). The buck was shot and a local hunter was allowed to tag and take the deer. Both injured people had to seek medical treatment at the Davenport Hospital.”

Why not? You know you want one. It’s the modern age after all and you will be the envy of all your friends . . .Cabela’s Comfort Max 360° Original Blind Chair

Set up this chair in your blind and you’ll sit comfortably while waiting and instantly be in position when it’s time to take a shot. Because it silently swivels a full 360°, you can effortlessly turn to shoot out any side of your blind. Strong Dura Mesh fabric provides day-long back support and cool breathability.  Swiveling, large “duck” feet on each leg provide added stability and keep the chair from sinking into soft ground. Heavy-duty 22mm and 16 mm steel tubing keeps it stable and ensures season after season of use. Easily folds down for convenient transport or storage. Imported.

comments

  1. avatar jwm says:

    Disease spreads thru the deer population like that because of over population. Instead of hunters thinning the herd and increasing the chances of good health for the remaining deer the disease decimates the deer population.

    Anti hunters must harbor a secret lust to see all wildlife wiped out.

    1. avatar M1Lou says:

      I never saw so many deer until I got to TN. I have them eating right outside of my office window all of the time.

      1. avatar Shotgun Sam says:

        I live near the Nine Mile area where that trophy buck was taken. Lots of large bucks around. But also lots of Hollywood celebrities and rock stars living in the area. So one usually needs to own land in that area just like the California transplant who got the buck. So before all you pack your bags and head to the great redoubt, you better have deep pockets. This place is invite only. No point in the deer hanging out with the riffraff hunters in the nearby national forest when you can eat well in the organic gardens of the Hollywood offgriders.

  2. avatar Darkman says:

    Killed my first deer at age 9. 50 years ago with a H&R 22 single shot. did it to put food on our table. Hunting was a way of life in my youth. What we didn’t catch or kill we had to grow. Hugh garden and orchard along with bee hives. Lived in a house with no running water or toilets. Carried water in the house from a picture pump by the back porch. Heated it for baths on a wood cook stove where we cooked our meals. Life was hard. Chores to do livestock to tend to. Life was hard but we lived well. Killed dozens of deer, rabbits, squirrels, ducks and various other critters to eat. Shot them with mainly a 22 rifle a 410 shot gun and 12 ga shot gun. Later on I acquired a old Marlin 3030 for some work completed. We never concerned ourselves with the law when we shot or fished for our food supply. It was always the way we survived. All these years later I find myself returning to those old ways of life. Taking what my family needs to survive and nothing more. Hunting Fishing trapping raising a garden and raising a few pigs and chickens. Guess it may be a second childhood. All I do know it’s not as hard as I remembered it being. These things I’ve always believed were and remain the rights of all citizen to do in regards to their choice of lifestyle. Living Simply and Free of the Governments Tyrannical Meddling.

  3. avatar Curtis in IL says:

    “Wardens say they don’t know whether she was hunting or in the woods for another reason…”

    You would think the presence of a rifle, or the lack thereof, would answer that question.

    1. avatar Marus (Aurelius) Payne says:

      Maybe she was hunting via pheromone control. You know, you stand there emitting the right scent, the deer walks up to you and then you just break it’s neck.

      Was her last name Prefect, by chance?

  4. avatar Juice says:

    When you’re deer hunting, you should be striving for humane, precise shots placed in the vitals. Who are these jackasses mistakenly shooting human beings? You have a high powered rifle in your hands and there’s a supermarket not too far away full of meat. Please don’t shoot at everything that moves while you’re up in your stand. I have a couple issues with the 4 Rules of Gun Safety, but not with the one that says “Be sure of your target and what’s behind it.” If you can’t positively confirm you’re looking at a deer, don’t shoot. Hell, don’t even point your rifle at it.

    I’ve taken my share of deer, with a nice 10-point buck in the mix. You don’t have to just blast away.

  5. avatar 1919a6 says:

    I hunt and carry for defense. I also have a bit of a prejudice against hunters because I own 200 acres of land and am tired of hunters that have the attitude of “I bought my license and can go wherever I want” Most are good and ask before they hunt.
    What I never understood is if I’m responsible for every round I fire in self defense, then why am I not held to the same level of the law when hunting?

  6. avatar Rocky says:

    I once heard something about “Know your target, and what’s beyond it” or some such.

    1. avatar FedUp says:

      The “what’s beyond it” part might give rise to negligence charges (or no charges if the woman was on property she didn’t belong on and the hunter had good reason to believe nobody was there), but if the woman was the target the minimum charge should be manslaughter in the first degree.

  7. avatar Joe R. says:

    H I L A R I T Y (not this article Liberte, it was pretty good)

    TTAG HAS A SIG SAUER AD ON THE ‘MAIN PAGE’ and I wanted to view it / clicked on it /

    N O T H I N G.

    But the ghosted / gotcha ads [it must be “wrist day” workout trying to avoid them] seem to track your mouse cursor. W T actual F.

  8. avatar Rincoln says:

    Am I the only one amazed that a mime spoke?

  9. avatar ProfessorManque says:

    If you find any remains I sincerely hope its of folks out looking to kill deer with weapons and erroneously terming that a sport and posing smiling with the deer corpse… we need to see more deer killing hunters and feasting on their steaks… seriously yall are sad and sick, in a decent world youd be sent to prison via the psychiatric hospital… youre legitimated adult versions of the sociopathic adolescent who grabs a cat by the tail and dashes its brains out… you really should take a look at what youre doing…

    1. avatar Scoutino says:

      Look, vegan macaque!

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

button to share on facebook
button to tweet
button to share via email