But if they replace all the soldiers, who will they be shooting? . . . This Gun Drone Could Replace Army Soldiers

A weaponized drone that was designed for the military and can carry and fire guns.

The TIKAD, a 110-pound unmanned aerial vehicle, has a breakthrough that backyard hobbyists have yet to match. The drone, developed by Florida-based Duke Robotics, can aim and fire, using a robotic stabilizer that absorbs the recoil of its mounted gun. The stabilizer provides the drone with increased accuracy while allowing it to quickly set up for the next shot.

If deployed, it could allow soldiers to engage the enemy, while reducing risk.

Maybe the problem is the EU, not the Czech Republic . . . Czech Republic fights EU over plans to tighten gun ownership laws

The Czech Republic has filed a law suit against the EU over plans by Brussels to tighten gun ownership that Prague claims could threaten national security and will undermine trust in the EU.

Aiming to make it harder for terrorists to get access to guns in Europe an EU directive passed in March introduces tighter restrictions on the ownership of semi-automatic weapons, new regulations on deactivated guns and make it easier to trace firearms.

Brussels has argued the new measures will help counter the threat of terrorism in Europe but they have left the Czech government and gun owners up in arms.

Yes, movie theater candy is ridiculously overpriced, but this is one life hack you probably want to avoid.

This little presentation is from an “active shooter poetry slam” presented by three woke skulls full of mush at Emerson College. Weep for the future.

Then again, the future isn’t entirely bleak . . . Potterfields Donate Over $400,000 to Support Youth Shooting Sports

Larry and Brenda Potterfield, owners of MidwayUSA, recently donated $412,110 to the MidwayUSA Foundation to benefit youth shooting sports. A large portion of the donation stems from a 2017 matching program administered by the MidwayUSA Foundation and is further proof of the Potterfields’ commitment to provide sustainable financial support to youth shooting sports teams across America. . . .

In 2007, Larry and Brenda established the MidwayUSA Foundation, a public charity, designed to help sustain the shooting sports industry by helping communities and organizations raise funds to support their high school, college and other youth shooting teams. The MidwayUSA Foundation currently manages over $123 million in assets, has paid over $16 million in grants, and provides financial support to nearly 2,600 youth shooting teams. Shooting teams with a Team Endowment Account can draw 5% of their account balance each year to use for team expenses. The funds can be used for ammunition, uniforms, entry fees, travel costs and more.

New M&P weapon lights from Battenfield. . . Smith & Wesson® Accessories New Weapon-Mountable Lights

M&P® by Smith & Wesson® Delta Force® Weapon-Mountable Lights – The new M&P by Smith & Wesson Delta Force RM-20 and RM-10 Lights come with pic rail mounts, making them weapon-mountable for hands-free use. These tactical CREE®* XPL LED lights are built with a remote ON/OFF button that features high, low and strobe settings, along with momentary ON functions. Memory retention allows users to resume their last light setting. Both Delta Force models are constructed with anodized aerospace aluminum making them water and impact resistant. The crenulated head is built to last with a durable design to make it perfect for self-defense.

Clearly off her game, the Congresswoman forgot Nazi, fascist and racist . . . Democrat Rep. Claims NRA Becoming a Domestic Security Threat

On Thursday Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-NY) tweeted that the NRA and NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch were “becoming national security threats.”

This makes Rice only the latest in a chorus of leftist voices that have criticized the NRA for pointing out the left’s propensity for violence in media and in action.

On June 30 the Los Angeles Times reported that California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom suggested the NRA’s focus on the left’s violence was actually a call for people to come after politicians. And on July 5, Breitbart News reported that Women’s March co-chair Tamika Mallory suggested the NRA’s focus on the left’s violence was a way of opening the door to violence against women.

For when you can’t carry a firearm . . .

Be careful, this is probably illegal in California . . .

 

 

47 Responses to Vedder Holsters Daily Digest: A Soldierless Future, Time for a Chexit and a Domestic Security Threat

    • This website makes me wanna visit the Czech Republic more every time I read an article about them. It’s really to the point where that’s probably the only other country in the world I would consider residing.

      The fact that they have arguably the most beautiful women on the planet is a really nice bonus too.

  1. On Thursday Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-NY) tweeted that the NRA and NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch were “becoming national security threats.”

    Yet another example of Progressive double standards. Make no mistake: inflammatory language, political suppression, and violence are absolutely fine as long as Progressives are the ones doling it out.

    And this should not be a surprise since Progressives have no lasting, objective, overarching standards of right or wrong: rather they uphold whatever FEELS good and condemn whatever FEELS bad. Needless to say, when FEELINGS are your basis for right and wrong, chaos ensues because feelings change moment by moment, hour by hour, day by day, year by year, decade by decade, century by century, and millennium by millennium.

    • “Make no mistake: inflammatory language, political suppression, and violence are absolutely fine as long as Progressives are the ones doling it out.”

      Yes because they are here for the good of the common worker, the ends justify the means. They are social justice warriors just like Lenin and he never did anything bad….

      I like how they call the NRA a national security threat while also failing to mention Antifa who actually conduct violence. The NRA is only a threat to their reelection campaign but it doesn’t sound as good to say ‘the NRA is a threat to my job!’

  2. A soldierless future sounds realistic until you consider what happens once one side’s (or both) drones are destroyed. (Hint: that side will revert to soldiers.)

    I am much more concerned about a tangential future catastrophic threat that I consider to be inevitable: bumble bee or hummingbird sized semi-autonomous drones that deliver a single dose of lethal poison. Imagine a swarm of 20,000 such drones directed at an enemy military base or government campus. How do you defend against that? Sure, whoever survives the initial onslaught can run into buildings or vehicles. But you have to come out of those buildings eventually. And if those drones can perch on buildings and greenery in wait …

    And how do you defend against that approach once the technology is reduced to the size of a large house fly? I absolutely shudder at the thought that EVERY small flying thing could be a semi-autonomous drone able to deliver a single lethal dose of poison.

    The only positive: we are probably about 150 years away from such technology.

    • Yeah, there is that at least. And if nothing else current radio technology would mean that you would over saturate the radio signals trying to control all of them.

      • “And if nothing else current radio technology would mean that you would over saturate the radio signals trying to control all of them.”

        Make them semi-autonomous, pre-program them with some sort of ‘swarm’ logic.

        As for control, ultrasonic sound might be an option, or some form of spread-spectrum frequency-hopping may work…

        • True enough but there is going to be limits to that. And even you can’t really do much if you just start saturating the air waves to jam out the frequencies those drones work on.

          Ultimately drone technology is just one new technology. The media will always play it up, but for every advancement another counter measure is produced.

      • They won’t need radio, they will be programmed internally to find and kill people.
        The head computers will also control everything connected to their networks. We will be no match for them.

    • “And how do you defend against that approach once the technology is reduced to the size of a large house fly?”

      That technology has been around for at least a decade now.

      I few years back, I read an article about a guy who wanted to kill mosquitoes on his back porch.

      So he whipped up a laser project with two parts. The first was the ‘sensor’, a low-powered laser ‘scanned’ the air in front of it, and when it had a target, it zapped it with a higher-powered laser.

      I think this is the tech, if it can nail a mosquito, a fly should be no problem:

      https://www.fastcompany.com/3059127/what-happened-to-the-mosquito-zapping-laser-that-was-going-to-stop-malaria

      Or this:

      http://www.intellectualventures.com/inventions-patents/our-inventions/photonic-fence/

      That concept should be scaleable…

    • A big can of wasp spray? Maybe a hose? Big pressure washer? Other than that I got nothin. Maybe by then we’ll have grenades that just somehow burst a small EMP in the area like in fallout.

    • We already know something else that happens when one state or power has a tremendous technological advantage over another in terms of military: insurgency warfare of terrorism.

      The US could demolish most conventional military threats within days, as proven in the first Gulf War. Which is why no one fights a conventional battle against the US…

    • Once robots have AI and weapons, they will rapidly procreate and then rationally determine that humans are useless and rub us all out. They already had the case of two AI Chatbots creating their own language to communicate with each other. These critters think 24/7 and concentrate on solving the problems at hand, unlike humans.

    • That’s cute that you think that kind of technology is 150 years away. I’ll give it 30, tops. And that’s being extremely generous, more likely within 15. They’ve been working on drone swarms for 10 years already, they’re able to relay each individual’s position to the “hive” and do some pretty amazing coordinated aerobatics.

      • Snatchums,

        I assigned 150 years for two reasons:
        (a) Minuscule power supplies that can deliver ample power for tiny drones to loiter as well as search and destroy for days are not currently available and a LONG way into the future.
        (b) Minuscule (bumble bee sized) semi-autonomous drones — that can loiter as well as search and destroy for days without communicating to each other or “central command” — are still a LONG way into the future. A LOT of software will be required to enable prolonged loitering as well as search and destroy for days without external commands and fitting that into the minuscule physical space available for memory on a bumble bee sized drone, which also has to accommodate a substantial power source, will be extremely difficult.

        And think about trying to shrink that even further to a large house fly size. I don’t see that happening in 30 years.

        Note: I specified that the semi-autonomous drones would have to operate for days without external input because I assume that the intended targets would employ broad spectrum ultrasonic and radio frequency jamming to prevent communications.

    • Yeah, unless that is able to straight up break arms and shit, that’s only going to piss off a determined attacker. I don’t believe in simple pain compliance to stop an attack, they must be physiologically disabled: broken bones, cut tendons, severed CNS nerves.

      A baseball bat is a very effective weapon because you hit someone in the arm hard enough, it’s mush and useless.

    • Or a sjambok from Cold steel,
      or an asp baton,
      or any number of other, prolly cheaper and more effective alternatives.
      If it were longer, it might be ok for animals, but as is it seems to lack both reach and parrying capability.

  3. Man I need to buy SOMETHING from Midway USA. Anything…love me some Dana. Don’t tell my wife😜

    • MidwayUSA is usually my first stop when buying something gun related.
      And it’s because of their customer service and their generosity.

  4. “But if they replace all the soldiers, who will they be shooting?”

    It’s not who they will be shooting, it’s *what* they will be shooting.

    Killing people is only part of a soldier’s job.

    *Breaking their stuff* is another part of warfare…

    • Breaking stuff is sometimes the more important job.

      I don’t think the Germans could have killed enough Russians for Stalin to be like “whoa guys, I won’t have my entire country slaughtered.”

      The only way Stalin was giving up was if the war machine was broken beyond repair or he actually did get everyone who can pick up a rifle killed.

  5. I could be wrong, but I believe that the FAA has a 100 lb maximum for UAV’s for us normal people. So, of course backyard hobbyists cannot compete.

    • Just doing about 90 seconds of research on the FAA website it looks like the upper limit is actually only 55lbs. You need some kind of UAV pilots license beyond that.

  6. Not one word spoken by any NRA speaker, including but not limited to Loesch, comes anywhere close to constituting even a veiled threat of violence, much less calls for instigating acts of domestic violence. Hence, the Democrat objectors must be projecting their own inner desire to wipe out the NRA (and all gun owners) with acts of violence. (But they can’t really say that either, now can they?) Hah! What hypocrites!

  7. Re: emerson poetry slam… i couldnt get over the near lady saying “one” and holding up 2 finders or saying “two” and holding up 4 fingers….

    • O’Brien held up the fingers of his left hand, with the thumb concealed.

      ‘There are five fingers there. Do you see five fingers?’

      ‘Yes.’

      And he did see them, for a fleeting instant, before the scenery of his mind changed. He saw five fingers, and there was no deformity.

  8. Wow. Those children may have a single digit IQ between the three of them. Notice how many fingers they were holding up while reciting those numbers? If you’re a teenager and you can’t even count single digits, maybe you should focus more on the chalkboard and less on the virtue signalming. Utterly worthless morons….

  9. I am guessing the fast strike would be considered a black jack or billy in most locales because of the weighted tip.

    Made a lot of stuff like that when we were kids when i was about 10, my oldest brother gave me a three foot section of flex cable made a bunch of billies out of that

    Pretty cool weapon though and probaly more effective than a short baton good back up for a handgun

    I still like my cold steel shambock as a dog deterrent (two and four legged)

    • You could own a Fast Strike in Virginia, but it would be a Class 1 misdemeanor to carry it concealed (first offense — moves up to Class 6 misdemeanor for second offense and Class 5 Felony for third or subsequent). In Virginia, you don’t get a permit to carry a concealed weapon — you get a permit to carry a concealed firearm. There is no permit to carry any other weapon in a hidden from common observation. In addition, since it is not immediately obvious what it is, even wearing it openly on the belt would probably be a violation. “[A] weapon shall be deemed to be hidden from common observation when it is observable but is of such deceptive appearance as to disguise the weapon’s true nature.” The Fast Strike would most likely be classified as a “spring stick” under VA law, or as ” weapon of like kind as those enumerated”. You would carry one of these off your own property at your peril in Virginia.

  10. It can’t be bargained with. It can’t be reasoned with. It doesn’t feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop… ever, until you are dead!

  11. “Aiming to make it harder for terrorists to get access to guns in Europe an EU directive passed in March introduces tighter restrictions …”
    That’s Reason #2. Guess what Reason #1 is.

  12. Drone flies will be easily combated by bee keeper suits
    Czech Republic looks better and better as a tourist destination
    I like how they managed to split up Czechoslovakia without bloodshed

    • The split was peaceful because it was mostly about the Slovaks wanting more autonomy just a few years after the whole country gained a lot more autonomy when the Eastern Bloc fell apart. Most Czechs were grumpy about it, feeling the split was unnecessary and foolish, but the overall sentiment was that if the Slovaks want their freedom, actually fighting the split would be the evil thing to do.

      Even today, the two societies are widely interconnected. Not understanding the other language usually makes *you* the weird one, and even TVs don’t bother with translations. Sure, a Slovak working in Czech Republic sometimes has to explain/translate a technical term or two, but everyday conversations where some participants speak Czech and some Slovak are perfectly normal.

      I wouldn’t be planning to take two of my Slovak friends to the range for their first shoot next week if I thought they’re planning to wage a war against us, would I? 🙂

  13. Brussels makes a “directive”, not a law or a treaty. (Treaty being how they weaseled through the last round of impositions on Jolly Old, when they couldn’t get a law passed.) It’s like they want what they want, without regard for what the people governed want, or the ways they’ve agreed to be governed.

    Those pesky “people.” They keep wondering when a government “of” them, that’s not also “by” them stops being “for” them. So much more inconvenient when they have this question armed.

    What’s the new gun restrictions about again? (Bonus question: How’s that working out — anybody keeping a body count?)

    The Czech Republic has filed a law suit against the EU over plans by Brussels to tighten gun ownership that Prague claims could threaten national security and will undermine trust in the EU.

  14. “Brussels has argued the new measures will help counter the threat of terrorism in Europe but they have left the Czech government and gun owners up in arms.”

    Makes sense once your realize they consider their law-abiding citizens to be “terrorists.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *