Liberte Austin’s Hunting Digest: A Death in the Family, Slaughtering is Dangerous And A Fifth Ave. Redneck


After being bullied on social media, a fellow hunter and outdoorsman took her own life. The abrupt death of this young lady, only 27, didn’t soften the hearts of those attacking her for her outdoors pursuits.  The verbal assaults on her social media pages continued, with the anti-hunters celebrating her death. Her social media pages have since been taken down.

Huntress Melania Capitan Commits Suicide amid Threats from Animal Rights Activists

Capitan was from Catalonia, Spain, but had lived in Huesca for the last three years.

The Daily Mail reports that 27-year-old Capitan gained fame among outdoorsmen and women by “sharing her hunting tactics,” photos, and stories of her daily life.

Some animal rights proponents reacted to the suicide by applauding Capitan’s death. One person commented, “You have done a favour to humanity! Bye Bye,” while another said, “She was so bitter that she had to pay her hate killing innocent animals, thank God she killed herself, the only good thing she did lately.”

You can’t fix stupid and reasoning with such ignorant hatred is pointless. So sad for the family of this woman that have to mourn the death of their daughter while others praise it.

Compared to the US these fines don’t seem harsh enough.

Two Almaguin men among four facing almost $10K in hunting fines –

Court heard that on Oct. 19, 2016, Bradley Morris of Listowel and Evan Pleasance of Durham [Canada] became aware of a moose that was near Stisted Road, in Sprucedale.

They obtained shotguns, located the moose, then shot and killed it. Neither man had a licence to hunt moose. Lorne Hack of Sprucedale assisted with removing the moose from the bush and transported it to the residence of Kenneth Leeder of Emsdale, where the moose was butchered . . .

Morris and Pleasance pleaded guilty and were each fined $2,000 for hunting moose without a licence and $1,500 for making a false statement to a conservation officer. In addition, they received a two-year hunting suspension.

Hack pleaded guilty and was fined $1,000 for possessing unlawfully-killed wildlife and $500 for transporting unlawfully-killed wildlife. Leeder pleaded guilty and was fined $1,000 for possessing unlawfully-killed wildlife

The headline reads “Police kills an moose with a shotgun in the street.”  This moose most likely was involved in a B&E (breaking and entering) or perhaps a D&D (Drunk and disorderly). I dunno, seems fishy to me. I want to see the body cam video to ensure the Moose’s rights weren’t violated. (Click here for a list of police jargon)

You really have to trust the person with whom you hunt. You may think you know them to be a safe, cautious and responsible hunter — and then be shocked to learn you don’t know them at all when they’re full of adrenaline.

I’ve seen grown men fight over who should take a shot at an animal that popped up suddenly during a hunt. Hunting on unknown low fence ranches, with thousands of acres, in the middle of nowhere AND with strangers maybe not the best idea, but boy is it fun!

Man accidentally shot in head during possible hunting trip –

Authorities were called to Springs Rd, Parawa, almost 40km west of Victor Harbor. at 3.45pm on Sunday amid reports a man had received a “serious wound to the head”.

Detectives are investigating how the man came to suffer “life-threatening” gunshot wounds but the man had been at an area of native forest popular with deer hunters.

Police believe the incident is not suspicious and are treating the shooting as an “accident”.

The man, who has not been named, is in a critical condition in the Flinders Medical Centre after he was flown from the Fleurieu Peninsula.

The fact that Donald Trump Jr.’s a trophy hunter doesn’t endear him to conservationists. Well, the ones too ignorant to realize that hunting in all its legal forms protects both land and wildlife. And the lands and wildlife of people living in developing countries. In this, the British press are particularly stupid.

‘There’s no sport in that’: trophy hunters and the masters of the universe

Donald Trump Jr, the president’s eldest son, goes hunting with his bow most weekends and is referred to by his friends as the “Fifth Avenue redneck.” He has targeted elk and mule deer at home as well as “15 or 16 species” in Africa, where he has been pictured grasping a severed elephant’s tail and holding a dead leopard with his brother, Eric.

Last year, Donald Trump Jnr said the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) “should be encouraging American hunters legally and ethically hunting abroad, not hindering them.” He also called for wolves to be culled in the US west, claiming they deprive hunters of moose.

Junior is seemingly attempting to fashion a new type of “hunter” – invoking the spirit of Roosevelt while posing with big game body parts and viewing public lands as sites for shooting and mining and not much else.

“We have to make sure we’re heard,” he told Petersen’s Hunting. “Lately, we’ve been a forgotten group. I want to change that now and forever.

“And we are going to do whatever we can to make sure that any kind of Trump presidency is going to be the best since Theodore Roosevelt for outdoorsmen, for hunters, for our public lands, and for this country as it relates to anything in the great outdoors.”

Bully for Donny Jr.!.

Hunters in Africa have to eat to survive. The conditions and their tools aren’t the best. Not to mention the heat which accelerates decomposition.

Above we see a hunter cleaning an elephant. I can’t even imagine how long that takes. They’re using bare hands and dirty tools and I’m sure they don’t have deep freezers and orca coolers back at home.

Truth be told, any meal, even an infected one, is better than nothing in some parts of Africa.

Hunting-related pathogen exposure not just for adult males

The researchers found that hunting techniques used in the [African] villages included communal and individual hunts. Hunters relied on nets, snares, traps, guns, and dogs.

Descriptions of communal hunts included the ways children were involved, as well as how women played a role, for example helping to flush pray into nets, for instance. Boys often started hunting both alone and in groups from around age 7, and were motivated to do so due to pressure from their family and lack of access to other food, the researchers found.

Animal carcasses were always handled with bare hands, and both men, women and children were all involved in preparing and cooking meat, over a fire. Reasons for hunting were complex, and included a need for food, crop protection, income, and social importance.

With all the do-gooders in the world helping to bring clean water, electricity, communications and schools to the developing world, wouldn’t it be great if there was a group helping hunters to know how to clean their kills, supplying them with the proper equipment?

Don’t get me wrong: I’m pretty sure native Africans could out-hunt any westerner with their bare hands. However, due to their circumstances they have to clean and preserve their meat without modern technology.

Any thoughts on how you could preserve and clean meat in the wild without the aid of technology and basic luxuries like clean water? If anyone reading this with the means to carry out such a plan is interested, hit me up below.

Speaking of dirty water, I just received and started using the Sagan water bottle. Go buy one for you and those you love that spend time outdoors. This bottle can literally save your life.

The Sagan Journey™ Filtered water bottle removes bacteria, virus and giardia. Filters 250 gallons of water. 24 fl oz capacity.

The Journey™ Water Bottle with Filter is a filtered water bottle for everyday use, all outdoor adventures, survival and emergency preparedness. The Journey™ Water Filter removes bacteria, virus and giardia. Makes any non-salt water source safe, drinkable water. Sagan water filter test results have been performed by independent water laboratories. The best water filter you can buy for your personal water bottle.

 I have yet to go fill mine with dirty pond water but I will definitely do it and take one for the team. Updates and diarrhea log soon.

If Dr. Vela were my dentist I might actually enjoy my dental visit. Instead of talking through a suction tube about the weather we would be swapping deer stories. I wonder if instead of a goody bag full of toothpaste and floss I would get some doe urine and scent blocker instead? A girl can dream.

Hunting heritage on display in Alice

The 800-square-foot space now houses 40 whitetail shoulder mounts, 12 mule deer, and four African animals. Each sparks a memory and tells a story. Most of the mounts were done at Randolph’s Taxidermy. Fred Randolph estimates his work on the collection represents about $35,000.

Marcos Garcia, a longtime antler scorer who measured all of Vela’s deer, but is not certified by Boone & Crockett, estimates the whitetail collection alone represents roughly 6,000 antler inches. If you do the math, you’ll notice these are not all 170-200 class bucks.

This is not important to Vela. And to believe it should be, misses the point of this heritage collection.

comments

  1. avatar Jim B says:

    In Africa the natives preserve the meat they don’t eat right away by drying it in the sun making what is called biltong. They can butcher a large animal and have in drying very quickly. Fresh meat is often distributed which can be a festive occasion when there is a lot to distribute.

  2. avatar Geoff PR says:

    “Any thoughts on how you could preserve and clean meat in the wild without the aid of technology and basic luxuries like clean water?”

    Salt?

    Although NaCl may be expensive where they are…

    1. avatar jwm says:

      Cut it in thin strips and sun dry it. They got sun there.

      1. avatar Geoff PR says:

        The ability to maintain an edge on a knife able to really thinly slice may be problematic out there…

        1. avatar Geoff PR says:

          The primitive folks probably use rock they find for sharpening…

        2. avatar jwm says:

          National Geographic did a pictorial essay on a Professors attempt to process an elephant that died at a zoo using only stone tools like the ancient ones had.

          He got the job done. people living in the bush and with numbers helping ought to be able to keep a few knives sharp and working.

        3. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

          I was blown away watching the skinners go to work in camp. A rather large flatish Rock nearby being used to keep an edge on the knives. Oh, and spit.
          Not bad edges on their blades.

        4. avatar Hank says:

          Obsidian is about as sharp as you can get.

        5. avatar Geoff PR says:

          Obsidian or, something they can flake off easily like flint is rather sharp…

        6. avatar Jim B says:

          The people in Africa are not as primitive as some people seem to think. I have been to North Africa, East Africa, Southern Africa, and West Africa and believe me they don’t have any problem keeping an edge on knife or making biltong (dried meat) out of game. Nothing goes to waste. They even eat the entrails and hooves. Preserving the meat from game animals is not a problem for the people there just as it wasn’t for us before canning and refrigeration. I am not sure where Ms Austin was hunting where it was but I have never seen the people in need of a Kenmore chest freezer in Africa. I suppose it would be nice but not necessary.

          If you don’t believe they can keep a knife sharp the next time you’re in the bush in Tanzania ask one of the boys guarding cattle in the middle of nowhere if you can look at his spear called an assegai. They are sharp as a razor. You can see why they are not afraid to go after lions with one. They are a hell of a weapon.

          Remember that the meat from game is often shared not unlike here except with a lot of accompanying singing and dancing. I once shot three cape buffalo in a single day (long story) and the party went on all night. I suspect everyone in the village had buffalo for breakfast, lunch and dinner. The rest was dried. Often they put pepper on it to keep the flies off. I have done that too with caribou in Alaska much to the exasperation of the butcher.

    2. avatar Matt S says:

      Make jerky out of it.

      1. avatar tiger says:

        Elephant jerky? Ok, for the first five pounds. Do you want 900 pounds though?

        1. avatar F bomb says:

          Better than letting it rot.

        2. avatar The Gray Poseur says:

          I suspect those African folks are a little further along than us westerners give them credit for. That’s a dirty little secret the trophy hunters don’t want the rest of us to know.

        3. avatar cpc says:

          You do want 900 pounds if there are 900 other folks in the area.

        4. avatar jwm says:

          I’ve never had elephant jerky. I might want the whole 900 pounds.

    3. avatar BLoving says:

      Humans have been preserving meat by drying it or smoking it since shortly after we swung down out of the trees.
      Just because you dried it doesn’t mean you have to eat it that way – Make a stew out of it with some garden veggies or foraged plants to help stretch scarce resources.
      As I recall, a friend of mine who used to guide on the continent years ago said that when a big kill was made by a tourist hunter, the hunter would be asked if they wouldn’t mind sharing the meat with the local villagers in exchange for some free/cheap labor processing the carcass. The answer was usually “of course” and those folks would have that carcass stripped to the bone and distributed to the village in what seemed like minutes. So, no… I don’t think preservation is a really big problem.

    4. avatar BLoving says:

      Mankind has been preserving meat via drying or smoking since shortly after we swung down out of the trees, but just because you dried the meat doesn’t mean you need to eat it that way – Make a stew with it and some foraged or home grown veggies.
      A friend I worked with years ago who worked as a guide on the continent told me it was customary for the nearest villagers to come offer to help process a large kill in exchange for the meat (which the tourist hunter often didn’t care about anyway) – after the client replied “of course”, those folks would have that carcass stripped to the bone in what seemed like minutes and distributed to the eager folks that had magically appeared outside the camp where none had been minutes before.
      So no, I don’t think preservation is much of a problem.

      1. avatar bLoving says:

        I hate you, phone… i distinctly clicked “Post Comment” already…

      2. avatar Lance F says:

        I have lived in the African bush ( central Africa) for 6 years. Anywhere there is electricity there are deep freezers. Also knives and files are everywhere, but a rock will do in a pinch to sharpen your knife. Salt is dirt cheap in the bush.

  3. avatar ActionPhysicalMan says:

    I went deer hunting with my step grandfather once. He shot at sounds and when my father chastised him he claimed that ‘that is how you flush the deer out so you can see them’. We went back to the car and never went anywhere with him again. It was a long time ago, late ’70s, but I am pretty sure he never got a deer.

  4. avatar tiger says:

    The 27 club claims yet another. Sad Melania did not come here instead of Crapbook. She might have found someone positive to talk to? As for the Moose? The Moose was just reaching for ID and looked like a suspect Moose.

    1. avatar Matt in FL says:

      Furtive movement.

      1. avatar ActionPhysicalMan says:

        Small explosive device in breast pocket.

  5. avatar Tim says:

    I’m very sorry the young lady took her own life and I mean no disrespect, but any adult who would commit suicide due to social media ‘bullying’ already has other more serious issues.

    1. avatar Outwardhound says:

      Other reports indicate the cyber bullying over hunting was not the reason for her decision.

    2. avatar BLoving says:

      This.^
      Yeah, seemed to me the young lady had other problems besides dealing with a bunch of douches on the internet – surely she was old enough to have learned how to ignore stupid people or to control the comments on her page.

  6. avatar rt66paul says:

    Hunting wolves to save the moose for hunters is not exactley a great idea. Wolves take advantage of the weakest animals, that way they are good for a species. They take down the hurt, the old, and the weak. While they do take down calves, a species will have more births if needed and the female is ready to mate soon after losing her calves.

    On the other hand, trophy hunters usually look for the best example of a mature male. The one they want has a big rack and is a big male. This is what is wanted to keep the population healthy and strong. Yes, the younger males can grow up to be a like speciman. While the females are not usually hunted(until the professional wildlife management decide they are too numerous), there is no restriction against the wolves going after them. Again, the wolves go after the weakest, so the females who may have a cripple leg or a defect(who might pass it on or raise calves in a substandard way), are not part of the gene pool.

    Wildlife management must be able to keep track of these trends, wolves could be hunted after conditions that favor them, say kills that are too easy due to sickness in the big game population, would expand thier population so much that they would regularly come after domestic cattle.

    There has to be a balance here. The hunting out of the wolves in the Yellowstone region did not help the genepool of the big game animals, now the tide is turning.

    I suburban and urban areas, the dogooders will say that coyotes, bobcats and black bears were there first and we can’t hunt them. I live in a community that was orchards and in the last 60 years has become suburban. As it is against the foothills and there are some wild areas in the middle of town, the dogooders say to leave coyotes alone. We get bobcats, black bears, but mostly coyotes roaming in the city, you see them even in the day. They are not afraid of humans and have tried to take small children. We can not leave the doggy door open at night, because they wait for smaller dogs and cats – they will even use a female in heat to draw males out of the house. Everyone knows someone or has had an animal snatched themselves by these wild animals(hawks get them, too).

    We need to get these animals back in the wilds and those that live off of our pets need to be euthanized. Not managing wildlife in the city is just asking for rabies and overpopulation of urban wild animals. There are many more of these predaters and other vermin(rats, possums, raccoons, skunks, mice) in the suburbs per sq mile than ever in the wild.

    1. avatar Hank says:

      I love the “they were here first argument.” Let’s apply that to humans and kick everybody out of everywhere.

    2. avatar Joseph Quixote says:

      Yeah sure wolves were beneficial to Yellowstone. Tell that to any rancher, hunter or guide in Wyoming, Montana or Idaho and you might get spit on at best. Have you studied what wolves have done to the moose in Yellowstone? How about the Elk herds reduced by tens of thousands, so bad that they won’t even issue hunting licenses in many herds because to few cow elk are having calfs. The only predator who benefited was grizzly bears because they are still the toughest kid on the block and often take and eat wolf pack kills. Wolves are enviromentalists dreams because they take hunters and free men out of the wilderness. They don’t realize that hunters and fishermans licenses keep the wild, wild. Tourists with cameras don’t put money back into the system to preserve wildlife, only hunters and fisherman. Sooner or later a wolf pack will kill some jogger or treehugger and then they will blame the person. Stop being led by the leftist press on wolves. The states should have freedom to do as they want including issuing many licenses to keep wolf numbers at a minimum.

  7. avatar Charlie says:

    ‘The headline reads “Police kills an moose with a shotgun in the street.”’

    An moose? I know english is medium difficult for foreigners, but “An Moose”? Jesus!

    Charlie

    1. avatar jwm says:

      It was shot with an shotgun using an slug. 🙂

      1. avatar F bomb says:

        I think maybe you are being a little harsh about the “an”. There are spelling and grammar mistakes in TTAG articles all the time. Including this one.

        1. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

          Generally, the rule is, if the following word starts with a vowel, it’s “an”.
          If the following word starts with a consonant, it’s “a”.
          A chair. Not an chair.
          There is leeway, of course. “A elephant” works as well as “an elephant”. But “an elephant is more grammatically correct.

          Thus endeth the lesson.

        2. avatar F bomb says:

          I know the “a” vs “an” rule. Maybe you need a lesson in reading comprehension. Your response has NOTHING to do with my comment.

    2. avatar IdahoBoy says:

      It was obviously a frame-up by police. Moose don’t have opposable thumbs. How the hell are moose supposed to even hold a shotgun, much less pull the trigger?

      There’s no way that moose had a shotgun when they shot it.

      1. avatar jwm says:

        Is that the moose that bit your sister?

    3. avatar Martin B says:

      It is an oft used theatrical flourish in speech , to place “an” in front of a consonant, especially if it begins with an “h” which is frequently aspirated. Of course, you sound like a douche doing this in public, but some people just want to mimic Shakespeare. Try not to be an tool.

    4. avatar Scoutino says:

      What was the moose doing there with a shotgun I will never know!

  8. avatar Matt in FL says:

    I have never heard of Orca coolers. Clearly Yeti has better marketing.

    I want to buy an Orca instead, just to support the underdog. They look functionally identical.

    Also those University of Florida Chasers are handsome.

    1. avatar Matt in FL says:

      Also, Orca made in the USA. So there’s that.

      1. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

        Another good brand is RTIC. I got in when they were crown funding. Got a smoking deal on a 65 quart cooler. As good as Yeti.
        And I think they’re out oh Huston.

    2. avatar Geoff PR says:

      “Also those University of Florida Chasers are handsome.”

      Meh, real tailgaters don’t care how warm the booze is.

      Then again, I have seen string trimmer gas engine powered blenders out there for booze Slurpees…

  9. avatar UnPC Aussie says:

    The Muppet down here in South Australia was about in the head with a .22lr and the cops are looking at attempted murder charges for the rest of the group so deer hunting seems like a spurious reason to be out and about in that story…

  10. avatar Peter says:

    Yeah, too bad about the hunter girl, such a waste of life for no real reason. I was really angry when I read about it the first time, angry on those sick bastards who helped to push her into that dark place from which it seems she wasn’t able to climb out on her own. It’s always sad to see someone take their own life, especially a young, beatiful, inteligent person with all of things still in front of them. I guess someone hit her in a soft spot with carefuly prepared load, probably someone who knew her personaly and the pain was just too overwhelming for her to cope with it alone. It seems that was the thing which pushed her over the edge, no one to share her pain with. She was apperantly living by her own with two dogs on a farm, and no pet can be a substitute for another human being, especially in times of hardship. 😐

  11. avatar Fort McHenry says:

    Why couldn’t they just taze the eight hundred pound animal? Moose Lives Matter.

    1. avatar Tom in Oregon says:

      Agreed.
      They must not have watched the vids from Taser’s own web site where they hit a 2,000 pound brahma bull and put it right down.
      Course, it was pissed beyond belief when the 5 second ride was over…

    1. avatar IdahoBoy says:

      Lifestraw is 1000 liters lifespan before filter replacement. Sagan is 250 gallons. Six of one, half a dozen of the other.

      Sagan is $64.99 on Amazon Prime, LifeStraw with a two stage filter is $38.95. Looks like LifeStraw for the win.

    2. avatar uncommon_sense says:

      Dcj and IdahoBoy,

      Please note that LifeStraw does NOT eliminate viruses.

      Thus, if you are filtering water from a forest stream that cannot possibly have human fecal matter, you are probably fine. If your water source could have human fecal matter, LifeStraw is inadequate.

  12. avatar Lance F says:

    I see some 120 and 130 class deer on that wall! Good for him!

  13. avatar Joe R. says:

    Melania Caitan didn’t happen to bad mouth the clintons lately, did she?

  14. avatar anonymoose says:

    I will hunt any human I catch hunting me or my friends! You have been warned! lol

  15. avatar Louis says:

    “Updates and diarrhea log soon”.

    I’m pretty sure diarrhea log is an oxymoron.

  16. avatar Aaron says:

    OK, somebody explain to me why a person ever commits suicide over “social media bullying”???

    you can bully ’em back. or turn it off.

    seems to me that it’s the easiest type of bullying to avoid.

    but what do i know, i haven’t logged into my facebook account for years, because i really don’t care about what you had for dinner on vacation or what cute thing your dog just did.

    1. avatar Jeff says:

      I deleted my facebook acct years ago. Not because I was bullied, but because I got sick of hearing about all the minutiae of my family and friends lives. The final straw was my daughter asking facebook which of a list of tattoos she should get, and my other daughter saying “all of them”. That was enough for me.

      I know a few people that take any remotely criticizing attitude and blow it completely out of proportion. They are all, in my opinion, marginally functional. I could see someone stricken with that disability, coupled with perhaps a shortage of real friends, plus some drugs or alcohol ( which is a drug after all ) that would lose all hope very quickly.

      Then I think of my grandmother, who died after a protracted fight with cancer. I remember that I was happy for her, to the mortification of the rest of my family. I was young, but recognized that she had been in pain my whole life. She never tried to let it show, but it was always there. When she died, I felt that she was no longer in pain, and that made me happy. Apparently I was the only one that felt that way.

      In the end, this girl was tortured and defeated by her own fears. There’s little a family can do to prevent this sort of thing from happening. We can only learn from this and realize she is at peace now. If you have sensitive friends or family, keep an eye on them, learn their “tells”, stay involved with them. But understand that this affliction they have can spiral out of control at any moment, can be triggered by the slightest glance, and overwhelm them before they can call for help.

  17. avatar Michael Lewis says:

    Question regarding her death…did she make a clean kill of herself? Or did she muck it up so that she took time to bleed out in agony, knowing that her life’s juices were draining away just like so many of her victims?

    1. avatar tiger says:

      I think most here will back me in saying, you are one sick SOB.

    2. avatar jwm says:

      Karma, dude. It’s real and it bites hard. You just earned it’s full wrath. I hope it’s not your mother or some other innocent that has to pay the fine for you.

      Unless your whole family is like you. Then here’s praying for a meteor.

    3. avatar Hank says:

      Not sure. Maybe you should find a medium, and ask the spirits of all the dead liberals that offed themselves after Trump’s epic win.

    4. avatar Erik says:

      Did Harambe use to touch you in your secret place? Because you’re weird, you smell because you’re fat and nobody likes you.

  18. avatar J says:

    Imagine that. A country (UK) with no real wilderness to speak of, where everyone is a clueless urbanite spouting off their ignorance for the world to see……..cant say im suprised…

  19. avatar kmeisner says:

    Sorry but this whole post reeks of Chelsea Handler coming out against anyone who finds racism funny. You can’t be a cyberbully calling people libtards and then complain about cyberbullies just because one of your hot conservative totally unsnowflake-like SUPER HARD CORE hunter friends killed herself! Suicide is always sad and if you’re actually upset about cyberbullying you should practice that mantra bish! Also learn how to write better since that’s your job.

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