By Bud Johnson

My father taught me to shoot when I was little. The Marine Corps built on that foundation. When I left the Corps, I became a mechanical engineer. All of which left a legacy of love for precision shooting.

While I have a lifetime of experience with rifles in calibers from .17 Remington Fireball to .50 BMG, I’d never shot a rifle with a Spanish-made barrel. So I jumped at the chance to precision test the Bergara B14 HMR (Hunting and Match Rifle) in 6.5 Creedmore.

 

Without accessories, the Bergara B14 HMR weighs-in at 9.15 pounds. It measures 41.5 inches in overall length and features a five-round AICS box magazine. The 22-inch 5/8-24 threaded barrel is perfect for mounting a suppressor.

The B14 HMR’s stock is molded with a mini chassis for consistency, with four QD flush cups. Unfortunately, those cups aren’t flush mounted. They provide otherwise avoidable inconsistencies along the stock surface.

Three quick detachable sling swivel studs are also mounted in the stock, with two on the muzzle end to accommodate both a sling and a bipod.

The stock features an adjustable cheek piece. The molded stock has enough adjustment options to accommodate shooters of almost any size and shape.

One downside, the stock is the same width as the forend. While that might not make a great deal of difference for hunting, the forend should be at least 2.25 to 3.00 inches wide for match shooting.

I removed the rear sling swivel in front to allow smooth movement on a Caldwell rest, to enable uninterrupted recoil for testing.

The B14 HMR’s receiver accepts 700 Remington short action rails and scope bases. I fitted the rifle with a Leupold 6.5-20x 50mm Long Range scope — a known quality (hence a good fit for this testing). Bergara sets the B14 HMR’s adjustable trigger at a consistent, crisp pull weight of three pounds, 13 ounces. I let it be.

This particular Bergara B14 HRM had already sent a lot of rounds downrange, so I gave it a good scrubbing. I did the same before ammunition changes. I fired two shots before data collection, except when I was using a LabRadar chronograph. I shot all group and chronograph testing rounds from a Caldwell front rest and a rabbit ear rear rest. I fired all shots over 250 yards from a pre-loaded bi-pod with no rear rest.

So . . .

Although it’s a little heavy, the B14 HMR’s crisp trigger broke cleanly. I shot the rifle to 600 yards with Federal ammunition in 12 miles-per-hour wind. Federal 140 HP performed extremely well. From a 10-shot string, the average velocity was 2753 fps; the extreme spread 68 fps; the standard deviation 28.9.

That’s a higher SD than I like, but the Federal ammo shot like the SD was a lot lower. I don’t have the ballistic coefficients for this bullet, but they are similar to a 140 grain Berger VLD hunting projectile.

 

I shot the target above at 100 yards. The two holes on the right represent my first group. I moved .5 MOA left and .25 MOA up to achieve a .26 center-to-center group (.276 outside-to-outside) group. That’s an exceptional result for a previously used rifle — or any rifle shooting factory ammunition.

Here are the elevations for the Federal:

250 yards       +2.5 MOA
500 yards       +10.00 MOA
600 yards       +13.75 MOA

Next up: Hornady’s 140 ELD Match ammo.

I shot four shot groups at the above target at 100 yards from the Caldwell rest. The average speed was 2733 feet per second, the extreme spread 40 feet per second and the standard deviation 17.0.

I put the B14 through its paces to 1000 yards with the Hornady ammunition in a seven mile-per-hour right to left wind. With a 100-yard zero the following elevations:

250 yards       +2.5 MOA
500 yards       +10.00 MOA
600 yards       +12.75 MOA
750 yards       +18.00 MOA
1000 yards     + 26.5 MOA

Bottom line: Bergara has built impressive accuracy into a rifle billed as a combination hunting/match gun, at a very competitive price.

Specifications: Bergara B14 HMR

Caliber: 6.5 Creedmoor
Overall Length: 41.5 inches
Barrel Length: 22 inches
Twist: 1 in 8
Magazine Capacity: 5 rounds (AICS compatible)
Weight: 9.25 pounds
Length of Pull: 12.25 to 14.5 inches
MSRP: $1150

 

Ratings (out of five stars):

Accuracy: * * * * *
This is a surprisingly accurate rifle, especially at the price point. While it tended to scatter if shooting more than five rounds without being allowed to cool, if this is indicative of the quality of Spanish rifles and barrels, color me impressed.

Reliability: * * * * *
Zero problems, as you’d expect from a quality bolt gun.

Appearance: * * * * 1/2
It’s an attractive rifle that looks as good in the woods as it does on the range.

Ergonomics: * * * *
Excellent customization options to fit any shooter. Though slightly on the heavy side (and who isn’t?) the trigger is crisp and breaks cleanly. The narrow forend and non-flush QD mounts keep the B14 from perfection here.

Overall: * * * * 1/2
The B14 HMR performs to a very high standard, especially for the price. It’s an excellent hunting rifle. With a little work, it could be truly match-ready, too.

22 Responses to Gun Review: Bergara B14 HMR (Hunting & Match Rifle) in 6.5 Creedmoor

  1. What are the features of the bolt, lugs, gas venting, etc?
    For the MSRP it looks like you get a fine rifle.

  2. My understanding is a 400 yard target reduced for 25 yards, shot at 100 yards. Which I guess would make it a 1600 yard target? I agree with everyone else, everything about the math of this article is a wreck.

    • Not being a rifle guy this is beyond confusing to me. seems like it went from a MOA gun at 250 yard to a 5MOA gun at 500yds. Doesnt make sense in my pistol shooting mind

      • The numbers are a wreck, because some people don’t know the difference between elevation and group size.

  3. I was thinking there has got to be a few mistakes. Why does the rifle shoot 1 MOA at 250 yards, then the group does 2 MOA at 500 yards, then even a larger circular area probable beyond that??

    • Bbl made in Spain with a thru plant cost of $25 to $100. I had a Savage 308 that went from sub moa at 100 yds to 12″ at 300yds.

  4. house cleaning due to redundancy? none of the deleted comments seemed particularly critical. well, other than mine.

  5. I’m starting to think Bergara may be in a future buy.
    I’m liking the accuracy of these things.

  6. Woah, what happened to my comment? There was nothing critical about what I said, I merely asked at what range was the rifle actually shot at? Did the author shoot the rifle merely at 100 yards or did he actually shoot it out at 1000 yards?

    This is the confusing part… “I put the B14 through its paces to 1000 yards with the Hornady ammunition in a seven mile-per-hour right to left wind. With a 100-yard zero I achieved 2.5 inches at 250 yards, 10.00 inches at 500 yards, 12.75 inches at 600 yards, 18.00 inches at 750 yards and 26.5 inches at 1000 yards.”

    I wasn’t critical of the author, the gun, or anything really I just wanted clarification…

    I’ve been reading this website almost daily now for 3 years on my lunch break. I normally recommend it to people as being fairly straight forward… Why delete my comment? Thats kind of dumb… And even though the article was edited, it still doesn’t clearly state if the rifle was only shot at 100 yards or 1000 yards.

    • I came back to see if there were any changes or additional comments too. Mine was deleted as well, I was critical of the author’s statements in reference to MOA not changing with distance, but rather being an angle measurement. If was clear a mistake was made, I addressed it in a tactful manner, and my comment was deleted.

      ED: Comments are not deleted for content, only flames. Your comment may have been stuck in the filter. Or disappeared down some black hole of which I know not. I apologize for this, and checked the filter to release it. Alas, it wasn’t there. Again, sorry. But rest assured that it’s no holds barred around here — save flames (ad hominem attacks), racism and other nastiness.

      • This is not a once – in -a- while occurrence, TTAG has deleted many comments of mine and entire articles from the likes of Sara Tipton (about not voting) and Firearm Concierge (about voting for the Hillary because it was better for business.)

        Forgive my skepticism, I don’t trust just anyone.

        • And it’s slipping in quality in other ways as well.. I may just delete my short cut to this web page.

        • Slipping in quality?! Say it ain’t so! You don’t want to see more cargo pocket dumps? What about irresponsible gun owners (that aren’t actually the owners of the guns?) /sarc

  7. Yeah the writing on this article is almost incomprehensible. VERY unclear what ranges this guy was shooting at what targets and what results he was getting. Also, no mention as to the size (ie # of shots) of his groups? Lot of difference in a 3 shot sub-moa group vs a 5-shot, for instance. Then theres the lack of any other real discussion about the gun itself… basic list of features and thats it. How’d it feel? Details about action/magazine, what other calibers/configurations is it available in? Hows the build quality?

  8. The target photos look like Appleseed targets.

    At Appleseed we teach 1 minute of angle (MOA) = 1 inch at 100 yards. (I know it is 1.04 inch) So 1 MOA would form a 1 in diameter circle at 100 yards.

    Since the angle progresses in a linear fashion, it forms a 2 inch circle at 200 yards, 3 at 300, 4 at 400, etc.

    I think I got the gist that the rifle can shoot accurately and produce respectable groups.

    I applaud the effort and appreciate the work that Mr. Zimmerman put into the article.

  9. I would like to know the group sizes at 500-1000 yards. I unlike others understand 26.5 MOA at 1000 yards is the adjustment in elevation not group size. It is heavy for a dual purpose rifle but it is competitive with the Tikka ctr, Savage Predator Hunter, Remington 700 Magpul, etc. I enjoyed the review.

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