A Day in the Life of a .357 Revolver – Content Contest

(This post is an entry in our spring content contest. If you’d like a chance to win a Beretta APX pistol, click here for details.) 

By Jon Tracy

Hi! My name is Maggie. I know that’s not a very exciting name, but I’m not a very exciting gun. I don’t like to talk about my looks, but if you must know, I’m a stainless steel Ruger Service Six with walnut grips. Some people might call me plain, but to be honest, my mom always told me that looks were superficial, and that people should respect me for what’s inside. So there’s that. She also told me that one day, I’d find someone who loved and respected me for being who I am…and guess what? I did!

His name is Jon. He’s really nice; I think you’d like him. Jon carries me all day in a very comfortable leather holster on his right hip. I used to ride in a Kydex one, but Jon told me that I’m a classy gal and I deserve a classy ride, so he got me the leather one. Told you he was nice!

A little about me; I was born in 1976; in fact, the side of my barrel even says “Made in the 200th Year of American Liberty”. It makes me feel patriotic, and I love the fact that I was born in a place that understands and respects me. I can shoot .357 and .38; I’m not a picky gal, but I have to say, I kind of like the kick that a .357 has. I’m the kind of lady that can pack a punch, you know?

I did have another guy before Jon; he was a State Trooper and he carried me for many years. I don’t remember a lot of that (I was pretty young at the time), but I’m told he passed away kind of suddenly. It makes me a little sad to know that I couldn’t save him from illness; I had his back for years, but sometimes there’s nothing that can be done. His wife wanted to make sure that my next owner was someone that would respect my heritage and take good care of me, so she gave to me to Jon.

Anyway, enough about my early years. Today I got to go to the range! It’s my favorite place in the world; green grass, blue skies, the gentle “ting” of bullets bouncing off steel plates…there’s really no place like it. I got quite a workout in, but I have to say; even after 200 rounds, I wasn’t even breaking a sweat. My double action trigger was clicking along like the day I was made, my no-snag sights were dead accurate, and my walnut grips gave Jon a perfect grip all day. I love when I’m able to work the way I’m supposed to!

When we got home, Jon made sure to clean me right away. “A clean gun is a good gun”, my mother always used to say! Tomorrow I get to ride in my comfy leather holster again, and I’ll have Jon’s back, all day, no matter what. I hope he never needs to use me, but if he does, I’ll be ready.

Before I went to bed in the safe with my other friends, I looked around and realized that even though there’s lots of guns here, there’s none quite like me. I come from a special place, from special people, and I have a personality all my own. I’m Maggie the Magnum, and there’s nowhere else I’d rather be.

comments

  1. avatar Ryan says:

    You’re a real looker Maggie, great story also.

  2. avatar Jon Tracy says:

    She is, in fact, a bit of a beauty, lol.

  3. avatar Walter, NOT The Dude says:

    ??
    Great twist to story telling.
    Great gun to tell the story.
    Jon’s a lucky guy.

    1. avatar Kjk says:

      What was the twist?

      1. avatar Ryan says:

        I believe he is referring to the story being told from the perspective of “Maggie” the gun.

        1. avatar Hannibal says:

          M Night Shyamalan, is that you?

  4. avatar skiff says:

    Ah, a Tyler grip, how retro! I have one on my J frame and my Colt Cobra too.

    1. avatar Jon Tracy says:

      Super old school. I wanted to keep her in the condition I got her in, you know? The Hogue grips are real comfy, but there’s something about the originals…

  5. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

    Weird, but I like the rev olver love.

    1. avatar BLoving says:

      Literary personification, taken to an extreme. Clever and cute.

      1. avatar Gov. William J Le Petomane says:

        It’s OK to love your re volver, just don’t LOVE your rev olver, at least not if she’s loaded. That could get you in a world of hurt.

        1. avatar jwtaylor says:

          Chef don’t judge.

  6. avatar Rimfire says:

    Not so weird, just a comfy story from a good gun told to the group, lol. I never saw anyone present the history and experiences of a revolver like that before. Kudos to the author.

    A totally innovative way to tell a story. Loved it.Was it special? hell yes!!

    1. avatar Jon Tracy says:

      Thanks! Much appreciated!

  7. avatar AR says:

    Maggie, what do you call that foundation “garment” on the front of the grip? How is it attached?

    Once I had a small .357 revolver that cracked my middle finger on the recoil of a full house load as the rear of the trigger guard snapped back. I sorta solved it with a rubber grip that curved up and around to the back of the trigger guard.

    This piece looks much more svelte than a chunk of Hogue.

    1. avatar Guidoc says:

      Probably a Tyler “T” Grip.

  8. avatar James VanTress says:

    Well done.

  9. avatar Crowbar says:

    Enjoyed the article. Maggie is fine!

  10. avatar PROUD chicano says:

    If she ever does catch you with your 22 tell her you only plink her but you’ll always love her sweet trigger the best. Even if it’s a little bit more grippy these days.

  11. avatar Mark Kelly's Diapered Drooling Ventriloquist's Dummy says:

    “I did have another guy before Jon; he was a State Trooper and he carried me for many years. I don’t remember a lot of that (I was pretty young at the time), but I’m told he passed away kind of suddenly. It makes me a little sad to know that I couldn’t save him from illness; I had his back for years, but sometimes there’s nothing that can be done. His wife wanted to make sure that my next owner was someone that would respect my heritage and take good care of me, so she gave to me to Jon.”

    Sniffle. Sniffle. I’m NOT ashamed to admit that THAT part brings a tear to this 6’3″ 192lb tough prick’s eyes.

  12. avatar LHW says:

    Nice, interesting work.

  13. avatar Fort Cannon says:

    Great story told from a different aspect. I would surmise that “Maggie” belonged to a former Connecticut State Trooper as they were issued the commemorative models in 76. They went from a 38 spec Colt, as I recollect, so there was an instant love of a firearm that could penetrate a car door. The grip adapter came in plastic and aluminum it was before the cheaper molded grips today. It was adequate and the guns given to the Troopers were quite accurate, if they were not they were whisked back to the company (In Connecticut then) and refurbished or replaced. Ruger was marketing for the LE market and the competitor was S&W up the road. Jon is a lucky guy, “Maggie” rocks. I have a sister to Maggie and when she locked a loaded she is a service of six. She is built like a Sherman Tank and can take any load through I can hang onto. Good Story. Maggie and her sisters were set aside for the Beretta 92F in 1983 one of the first departments to abandon the wheel gun for an Auto..

    1. avatar Art out West says:

      Were state troopers officially issued short barreled revolvers? This one looks like a 2.75″ version. I had the impression that this was the deceased trooper’s personal off duty weapon, not his service revolver. I figured troopers would have carried at least a 4″ version.

      The Ruger Six series revolvers are great guns. Last year, I picked up a 4″ stainless Security Six, and it is now one of my favorite handguns. The GP100 and SP101 are great guns as well, but I think the Six is the Goldilocks revolver. It’s not too big, and not too small. It is just right for a .357 mag.

      1. avatar Fort Cannon says:

        My guess would be this was not for road service – nor issued as he would probably not retained possession of it, although some did. If he worked in a bureau, or carried it for off duty it could have been an issued item. He might have just liked it and bought it for personal use. No matter, Jon is the new master.

    2. avatar Jon Tracy says:

      You are correct, sir. CSP uses the Sig 229R now, which is a fine gun, but doesn’t quite have the personality, you know?

  14. avatar Ed Rogers says:

    Great effort, thanks!!!

  15. avatar kevin says:

    So did the first owner get killed? Does the gun has PTSD? I’m so confused!

    In general, inanimate objects that talk are weird. Let’s leave them to the kids’ TV shows, where weird is normal.

    And unless you’re a private in Full Metal Jacket, don’t name your gun and don’t make it female. Cleaning “Maggie” out with a chamber brush is just creepy.

    1. avatar Fort Cannon says:

      I guess you took an amusing story to a new level, beneath mine. Nobody knows the previous owner’s story. I think the author was trying to win a contest and humanized the subject to give it character.

  16. avatar Omar L Lewis says:

    LIKE THOSE RUGERS …NEED A 357. ALL MINE ARE 38.S …

  17. avatar Ed says:

    Well thought out and presented. Great story.

  18. avatar Jim says:

    If my S&W 686p could talk it would say: Let me out of this safe!

  19. avatar Jeffy56 says:

    Very good story! I have her cousin born about the same time, .357 Black Hawk convertible, 7 inch barrel. When my eyes were good, 4 – 5 inch groups at 100 yards. Ya, the front sight covers all that space.

  20. avatar Deepak gp says:

    Vary nice

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