If you own a Jeep Wrangler you know there aren’t many places to stash a handgun. The glove compartment will hold what laughably passes for an owner’s manual nowadays, but not much more. The compartments in the console could hold a medium-sized gun and a magazine or two, but it wouldn’t be very convenient to get to if you’re in a hurry.

You can install locking drawers that mount under the front seats of the 4-door Wrangler but they’re only good for securing a (smallish) weapon and they can’t be installed in the 2-door Wrangler. If you want your weapon readily available without carrying on your person while you drive, Condition Zero has a solution.

Condition Zero makes a variety of weapon mounts for Jeeps and ATVs, plus a pistol clamp mount and rifle mount that should work in a variety of vehicles. I have a 2-door Wrangler JK, so I bought their pistol mount designed specifically for that model. They also make a mount for the 4-door Wrangler that looks similar, but has a slightly different installation.


The mount itself is powder-coated steel and comes with self-adhesive Velcro for mounting the included holster. The holster has a snap strap to secure the gun. That black embroidered bag is for you to use to cover your weapon if your state prohibits openly carrying one in a vehicle. Only one thing didn’t come with the mount: installation instructions.

I called Condition Zero about this and was told they didn’t include an instruction sheet because no one ever reads them and besides, it’s so easy to install. Then they described the procedure for me. That was fine, unless you’re visually-oriented like I am.

Fortunately there’s a Wrangler forum where a poster installed the 4-door version and documented the process with pictures. However, there are some minor differences with the 2-door version.

To install in the 2-door, you’ll need something to pry with, an 18mm socket and ratchet (and possibly a breaker bar and/or impact wrench), a T30 Torx driver, and (optionally) a torque wrench.

The first step: pry off the plastic lid on the trim covering the seat mount bolt at the front of the driver’s seat next to the console. Then you need to remove the mounting bolt using the 18mm socket and ratchet. However, if your seat was mounted by the same gorilla who mounted mine, you’ll find the ratchet useless.

I ended up using an impact wrench to remove mine. Whatever you have to use, remove that bolt and set it aside for later. Then use the T30 Torx driver to remove the two screws that hold the plastic cover in place. You won’t be reusing this cover, but you may want to hang on to it so you can replace it should you ever decide to remove the gun mount.

The bracket fits on top of the seat bracket base using the bolt you removed earlier. The on-line instructions have you installing the holster after bolting down the mount but I found it easier to install the holster with the bracket out of the Jeep before attaching it to the seat mount.

Rather than putting the self-adhesive Velcro on the holster then sticking it all in place as shown on line, I stuck the Velcro to the mount then attached and secured the holster to the Velcro. Be careful if you do it this way though, because when the adhesive on the Velcro sticks to the mount, it’s staying there. If you stick it to the wrong sides to orient the holster properly, you’ll have a hard time removing it.

Once the holster is secured to the mount, you just bolt it in place. You can either crank the bolt down as hard as you can, or reinstall it to factory specs at 45 lb.-ft.

And that’s it. The mount is handy, but doesn’t interfere with driving or shifting in and out of 4WD. The holster easily holds my GLOCK 17, so it should be able to handle most any hand gun you want to use.

Specifications: Condition Zero Pistol Mount, 2 Door Jeep Wrangler JK

Item Number: 6005
Price: $115.00

Ratings (out of five stars):

Design: * * * * *
Designed specifically for the Wrangler JK. As such it keeps a gun handy, but doesn’t interfere with the operation of your vehicle.

Ease of Installation: * * * * 1/2 
One-half star deducted for difficulty in removing the seat mounting bolt (admittedly not Condition Zero’s fault) and for not including installation instructions. Condition Zero should at least provide a PDF the buyer can print out if they don’t want to include one with the kit. Installation is a breeze except for these two small glitches.

Quality: * * * * *
The powder-coated bracket and nylon holster both appear to be quite durable. The black finish blends in well with the Wrangler’s interior and the mount isn’t very noticeable when looking into the vehicle.

Overall Rating: * * * * *
The only complaint I had was the lack of written instructions. Otherwise the mount is unobtrusive yet keeps the gun readily at hand. Highly recommended.

21 Responses to Condition Zero Pistol Mount for Jeep Wrangler: Gear Review

  1. Wranglers are a pain to put guns into and the new ones are just a pain to have.

    No matter how many gun mods you make to the vehicle you’ll never get that traction control button in front of the stick to do anything. Ya gots to remove the center console and install a switch to actually turn that crap off which is really annoying, at least on the ones that are a few years old because the traction control SUCKS.

    For rifles the best I found was the Big Sky Sky-Bar double rifle rack.

  2. I’d give the design only two stars for the very reason they include a cloth cover. Some states have more stringent requirements for a closed container. A better idea would have been a solid steel box that could be secured to prevent theft while at the same time providing quick access perhaps through a quick release mechanism.

  3. Can’t install an under-seat safe on a two door JK Wrangler? I beg to differ.

    For one, on 2010 and older models you can do it no problem.

    For two, on 2011 and newer models, for some reason, they added a bunch of useless bars under the seat for some reason. The solution? Angle grinder!

    I wasn’t apprehensive in the least, and on my two door 2012 I’ve been rocking the gun safe for at least a good four years. I will say my seat has no electronics however other than the ones needed to determine if a seat-belt is plugged in or not.

    As for fit of the safe: I have been able to get my Gov’t size 1911 in there WITH my Glock 19. I do have to take the mag out of the 1911 however (a Wilson Combat with an aluminum base pad, which sticks out a tad). I suspect if the 1911 was any taller it may not fit; it’s just enough room (with normal profile sights and no well extension of any sort) that I can take it in and out.

    Personally, I think if you plan (or need) to store your handgun in your car on a regular basis you should have something that’ll take a little more effort to break into than a plastic glove box or console. I got mine because I couldn’t, in good conscience, leave my gun in a Jeep with a soft top that can be broken into by someone with a sharp stick or the rare know-how of how to operate a zipper. If they had the gall to get in that far they’ll pop open the glove box and arm rest with ease and get what’s inside.

    • I have a lock box mounted under both my front seats. It is a 4 door though. I keep a Ruger GP100 with 6 inch barrel plus 4 speed reloads under the passenger seat. Plenty of room. The box under the driver seat is for my carry gun if if I need to leave it for any reason. I also have the holster mount. Works great!

      I live in SD and I like to take the top and doors off in the summer. I have received some interesting looks by folks from California, Illinois as well as a few other less free States. They see my pistol in the holster mount at stop lights occasionally. They almost seem mortified.

  4. The problem with car holsters is that in the high stress of an emergency situation, there is a good chance you will exit your vehicle and forget your gun. Even with a routine trip, its easy to forget if you have your mind on other things.

    In those cases, not only do you not have you gun, its left in the car, vulnerable to thieves.

    If you want easy access to a gun while seat belted, add a gun in an ankle holster to your belt carry. They work great in the car.

    • Fair point. I never seem to be able to get my pats leg up high enough to draw a firearm out of my ankle holster in a quick manner. I’ve practiced but never could get it done right. I also have short legs with an odd length inseam but don’t want to spend the money to tailor my jeans.

      For me, the holster mount works.

    • If you have the right body type and the car is built/adjustable to fit you, a shoulder holster is a great option in a car. Especially for older folks who might not be able to reach their ankle quickly.

  5. Seeking opinions –

    Would having an empty holster mounted like that in a vehicle be an encouragement or deterrent to crooks looking into parked vehicles to potentially break into?

    • Considering that the State of New Mexico changed their laws on carrying in an establishment that serves alcohol specifically because of criminals targeting cars for theft because they contained a gun, I would say it increases the risk.

      New Mexico didn’t care until the Santa Fe County Sheriff became a victim then suddenly it mattered.

  6. I got a tuffy under front seat box for my 4 door for Xmas. Waiting for good weather to install.

    I have one of the tuffy trunks that I’ve had since August. Works great for top down trips with guns in the back. I did have to modify it a bit to maximize the space. It’s not huge back there but I did the fnh 3 gun championship with it with no issue.

  7. $115 what a wast of cash. I own a Jeep JK and carry a Glock 22 at all times. It fits in the center council holstered just fine, 2 mags also. If I am on a long trip I will carry cross draw on my left hand side. It is more comfortable and easier to draw while seated if need be.

    Save the $115 and get yourself a good rain cover for when you have the top, and door off and it decides to downpour unexpectedly.

  8. Is this a joke product? What infomercial did you buy this on?
    I have a trail buster/hunting/ Zombie 1990 YJ.(it just won’t die) Never installed the doors or top. There is not even enough dash space to install a USB plug. I solved the driving carry problem by installing a chest holster on the seatbelt. Out of the holster on my hip and into the chest holster then back when I get out. (no airbags on my ride or “traction control”) Also bypassed the $hitty vaccum powered axle lock by installing a direct drive yoke on the front axle.

  9. You want to be very careful with those types of storage “systems”, especially if you get pulled over. In fact, it’s a good idea to get the gun out of there and on the passenger seat or dash before the officer gets to the vehicle. What you consider “in view” and what an LEO considers in view can be two different things. A buddy of mine who is a former cop got pulled over and a young punk stater on a power trip spotted his Ruger 1911 in a similar contraption in his Ford pickup, called it a concealed weapon and arrested him. He did a night in jail, his gun got confiscated and sent to the state patrol to be test-fired for ballistics and the whole ball of wax. Eventually the county attorney let him plead guilty to whatever driving offense got him pulled over and I think some other minor b.s. charge but it was a complete clusterf#ck.

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