Boise, Idaho based Eberlestock is probably better known for their hell-bent for stout and muy expensive packs than anything else. Chances are, if you own an Eberlestock pack or case, you’re quite serious about your craft. Passing by their booth, the glimmer of a couple rifle chassis gave me reason for pause.

Pictured above is Eberlestock’s M2-Cobra which is a direct bolt on replacement for the factory stock on your left or right handed short or long action Remington 700 pattern.  Available in Stealth Black, Dry Earth, Urban Gray, and Coyote Brown, the Cobra feeds your rifle off AI pattern magazines and can be customized to fit your body and shooting style. 

The buttpad is adjustable for length of pull and vertical drop. The cheek rest can be moved fore and aft as well as up and down. Also included in the buttpad is a spring loaded thumb screw monopod. Simply press a button to drop the pod out to a coarse adjustment and then dial it in further by threading it in or out. Once finished, push the button and retract the unit. Should you elect to not use a monopod, there’s a large flat portion below the buttpad, perfect for a sandbag. MSRP is $995.

The one thing the Cobra doesn’t provide is the ability to fold the butt stock away for cleaning or transportation. For that, you’d need to upgrade to the Stealth Rifle Chassis. Like the Cobra, the Stealth features an adjustable buttpad and cheek riser.

The folding mechanism is quite stout and locks up completely tight. Comparing it to the Cobra, I could just barely detect a little wiggle, but not enough to be cause for alarm. One cool feature, and one I haven’t seen on a lot of folding rifle stocks is that the folding mechanism includes the grip, making for a much shorter compact package overall.

The other major change from the Cobra is the inclusion of a full coverage forend that can be configured as either a slick side, or modular attachment style system. Both of the modular attachment systems add $200 to the price. Speaking of price, the Stealth chassis starts at $1995. Should you want to have a rifle built upon one of these chassis, Eberlestock is happy to accommodate with one of their custom rifles, which as you might guess, are priced on a one off basis.

The Eberlestock chassis are certainly a little odd, described by their team as sexy – something I’m not qualified to comment upon. In the hand, they feel light, nimble, and lithe. I’d have to shoot around with one a bit to see how it felt, but in the confines of their booth, it seemed to be something that looked a little different.

4 Responses to Hands on with Eberlestock Rifle Chassis

  1. Some of these chassis prices are just unreal. More ridiculous than our suppressors that are more than double the price of foreign made ones that work just as well.

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