Liberty Suppressors Goliath and Sovereign at SHOT Show 2017

John from Liberty Suppressors gave us the walk-through on their two newest cans, the Goliath and the Sovereign, at SHOT Show this year. I think they’re both destined to be good sellers for the company. In fact, I’m already angling at a Goliath purchase myself.

The Sovereign is a simple, short, lightweight, titanium suppressor made for .30 caliber cartridges (up to .300 Win Mag). The Goliath is a large, yet light-for-its-size, all-titanium suppressor designed for .458 SOCOM.

The Sovereign employs a swappable end cap so the exit bore is always caliber-appropriate for stripping as much gas as possible. Choose between 5.56, 6.5, and 7.62 options. While the silencer tube and core are titanium, the end caps are aluminum. +5 TTAG points* to the first person who nails the reason for this choice in the comments below.  * TTAG points are not a real thing

Additionally, the Sovereign ships with a lot of kit. Two direct thread mount adapters, a radially-ported muzzle brake mount, and a Liberty-branded Armageddon Gear suppressor cover.

At 10″ long and 2″ in diameter, the Goliath is a big boy. Of course, it’s made to bring the report of the big boy .458 SOCOM down to about 131 dB; an impressive feat, indeed. Despite its size, the Goliath tips the scales at just 20 ounces. Swappable thread inserts ensure you can mount this scooter muffler on barrels with many different thread sizes.

I get the impression that having a dedicated hog hunting rifle will immediately make me more of a Texan. To these ends, I’ve chosen to build a shorty .458 SOCOM upper for my AR-15 SBR lower. And, after handling the Goliath at SHOT Show, the decision was made: the upper will be built specifically around this can. Now…what handguards fit over a 2″ diameter suppressor?

comments

  1. avatar Robert w. says:

    Ti with Al caps: If I had to guess it would be to combat thread galling.

  2. avatar Peter says:

    I’m guessing the aluminum end caps are to ensure the can doesn’t get wrecked by an end cap strike. If Aluminum takes a hit it’s more likely to deform and blow out the end of the suppressor, leaving the core of the can and the threads for the endcap intact. Just a guess, I’m not an engineer or materials scientist though!

    1. avatar Jason says:

      Peter beat me to it. Can I piggy back him for 2.5 TTAG points? I think it’s a great idea. Should see much more of this in the future.

      1. avatar Jeremy S. says:

        Haha, yes. You can split the points.

        Indeed, it’s aluminum so when you shoot the can on your .308 but forget you left the 5.56 end cap on, that .30 cal projectile just makes a larger hole in the cap and doesn’t threaten any damage to the tube or core. You probably get the best suppression by letting the bullet create its own, perfectly-sized bore hole anyway 😛

  3. avatar Madcapp says:

    Interesting, is Liberty owned by Brits or something? I ask because the Brits believe everything they make should be called either “Sovereign” or “Sterling”, and “Goliath” is a likely also-ran in their peculiar vernacular.

  4. avatar AdamTA1 says:

    I believe the aluminum end caps are to eliminate the squeaky noise you get when screwing the pieces together. I mean a silencer is supposed to be silent, amirite?

    Come on 5 TTAG points!

  5. avatar Dan l says:

    If i could only own one suppressor it would be my mystic. Luv these guys! And a tip for those new to suprressors, direct thread is almost always the way to go. And if u have a different barrel with a different thread pitch , by a thread converter for 20 bucks, dont buy the 80 to 100 dollar different back end, or muzzle break….ymmv

  6. avatar Geoff PR says:

    “…these two cans (Tucans)…”…

  7. avatar Vanbulance says:

    Bullets are much smaller than suppressors, yes?
    Goliath and a scale-wise much smaller projectile…
    Think I’ll pass.

    1. avatar Jeremy S. says:

      I don’t think I follow…

      1. avatar Vanbulance says:

        David, Goliath, tiny little stone?

        You’ll never guess what happens next!

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